Colgan Air crew experience.

skiandsurf

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Posts
1,066
Total Time
--
I was reading though other threads and trying to find the crews experience. The times that are out are obviously wrong. I was wondering if anyone here can comment on the crews experience and flight time (NO BASHING, just the facts).

I ask this because in the threads, there is reference to the ACA J41 crash at CMH in Jan 1994. I knew that crew (heck it was my flight, that I called in sick for). The ACA crew....Capt was a first time PIC on a new plane. He had been with the company for a couple of yrs flying the J32 as an FO, and only had about 50 hrs in the J41 as PIC. The FO was a new hire...I think it was his first trip out of IOE (green on green). Trying to think of the mins back then to get hired was probably 2000TT.

Do you guys have any info like this on the Colgan crew.
 

CALRepublic

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Posts
576
Total Time
plenty
CA Marvin Renslow, with Colgan since Sept. 2005 (3379 hrs ) **Pilot Flying**

FO Rebecca Shaw, with Colgan since Jan. 2008 (2,244 hrs) **Pilot Monitoring**

FA Matilda Quintero, with Colgan since May 2008

FA Donna Prisco, with Colgan since May 2008

CA Joseph Zuffoletto, with Colgan since Sept. 2005 (deadhead


Not sure how many hours they each had in the mighty Dash 8-400, couldn't find that info.....I'm still waiting for some Colgan guys to chime in and give us some insight. I'm tired of all the guessing going on.
 
Last edited:

www.

SoCo Guy
Joined
Mar 18, 2006
Posts
821
Total Time
000000
CA Marvin Renslow, with Colgan since Sept. 2005 (3379 hrs ) **Pilot Flying**

FO Rebecca Shaw, with Colgan since Jan. 2008 (2,244 hrs) **Pilot Monitoring**

FA Matilda Quintero, with Colgan since May 2008

FA Donna Prisco, with Colgan since May 2008

CA Joseph Zuffoletto, with Colgan since Sept. 2005 (deadhead


Not sure how many hours they each had in the mighty Dash 8-400, couldn't find that info.....I'm still waiting for some Colgan guys to chime in and give us some insight. I'm tired of all the guessing going on.
From the FAA web site it looks like that the Captain was typed on 11/18/2008 and the FO 03/16/2008. The FO lived in WA so she may have flown the Dash at Horizon.
 

Volasl

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Posts
140
Total Time
9000
Off the topic, Im wondering how long the duty day of the crew was with the delay out of EWR. I hope the public will realize how many hours we work. Fatigue is almost always an issue.
 

quinnlake

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2005
Posts
101
Total Time
3000
Wondering weither crew experience or crew fatigue played a part in the accident assumes a bias that the crew either did something wrong, or could have done something better. This has not been proven. Until the NTSB report comes out, we cannot guess that somehow the crew was at fault, and a more experienced or better rested crew would have reacted differently.
 

CALRepublic

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 11, 2008
Posts
576
Total Time
plenty
From the FAA web site it looks like that the Captain was typed on 11/18/2008 and the FO 03/16/2008. The FO lived in WA so she may have flown the Dash at Horizon.
The Dash 8 is a fairly easy plane to fly, I flew the Das8-100, have about 2700 hrs in the thing....with regards to this airplane, I think its more relevant the crew's experience with winter conditions, not the airplane..
 

79%N1

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Posts
2,441
Total Time
2 many
NTSB now saying they wondering why the autopilot was flying if they knew they were in a severe icing situation.
 

A300FE

La vita e bella!!
Joined
Sep 28, 2006
Posts
105
Total Time
4500+
Off the topic, Im wondering how long the duty day of the crew was with the delay out of EWR. I hope the public will realize how many hours we work. Fatigue is almost always an issue.
I second this opinion. Fatigue or "I want to get there and go to the hotel after a long day" could cause even an experienced crew to screw up. I have seen this before in very experienced guys. The captain and FO might have flown in icing conditions before and thought they were not accumulating a lot of ice to divert. More than knowing the flight time the crew had (and the public speculate with Capt. Sully’s experience), I would like to know how many legs this crew flew that day, at what time they started the day, how much rest they’ve got from the day before, how much time they had between flights to grab something to eat.

What will it take for the FAA to change the rest time to a necessary 8 hrs. “in bed”, or how many more lives?
 

satpak77

Marriott Platinum Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Posts
3,015
Total Time
5000+
(fatigue) it appears they left 3 hours late, but who knows....
 

zasca

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 24, 2006
Posts
539
Total Time
12:54
In the original thread, someone said they were on duty since 13:00 or so. Super late leg yes. But apparently not that long of a day. Course, dealing with those insanely long ground sits are a trial in themselves.
 

SuperFLUF

lazy Mc Donald's pilot
Joined
Jul 9, 2003
Posts
639
Total Time
12,000
In the original thread, someone said they were on duty since 13:00 or so. Super late leg yes. But apparently not that long of a day. Course, dealing with those insanely long ground sits are a trial in themselves.
Of course, there can be more to it than that. What sort of duty days did they have leading up to that day? What time did they get in the night before.....
Fatigue is cumulative.
 

skiandsurf

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Posts
1,066
Total Time
--
NTSB now saying they wondering why the autopilot was flying if they knew they were in a severe icing situation.

Its going to come down to Pilot-Error, due to them flying with the AP on in icing conditions....FOM says No AP in icing conditions.

Factors will include icing conditions and crew experience.

Fatigue will not be a factor.
 

WSurf

The Smack Down!
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Posts
3,690
Total Time
6500
I also read that the autopilot was on the whole time. You would think it would have disengaged itself. Hmmm, don't know how the autopilot would have stayed on all the way till impact?
 

Erlanger

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2002
Posts
1,693
Total Time
13000+
Its going to come down to Pilot-Error, due to them flying with the AP on in icing conditions....FOM says No AP in icing conditions.
Factors will include icing conditions and crew experience.

Fatigue will not be a factor.
The NTSB says Colgan policy is "no AP" on in severe icing. Why would Colgan override the FOM? Has that "No AP" in the FOM always been there or was it amended at a later time?
 
Last edited:

Flywrite

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2002
Posts
770
Total Time
5500
Where did the 'severe icing' thing come from? Listening to the ATC tapes nobody on there mentions 'severe' icing. The ice-related comments, even when the controller askes about ice seem more consistent with light, maybe moderate icing, but nothing anywhere close to severe.
 

Erlanger

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2002
Posts
1,693
Total Time
13000+
Where did the 'severe icing' thing come from? Listening to the ATC tapes nobody on there mentions 'severe' icing. The ice-related comments, even when the controller askes about ice seem more consistent with light, maybe moderate icing, but nothing anywhere close to severe.
It's going to come down to what the crew was saying to each other and what they meant when they used the word "significant".
 

WSurf

The Smack Down!
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Posts
3,690
Total Time
6500
Where did the 'severe icing' thing come from? Listening to the ATC tapes nobody on there mentions 'severe' icing. The ice-related comments, even when the controller askes about ice seem more consistent with light, maybe moderate icing, but nothing anywhere close to severe.
I agree, however I think the CVR is gonna be the rope to hang this crew. They talked about all the ice on the window and wings.
 

WSurf

The Smack Down!
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Posts
3,690
Total Time
6500
I agree, however I think the CVR is gonna be the rope to hang this crew. They talked about all the ice on the window and wings.
I apologize for the wording with the rope comment. It wasn't in anyway meant as disrespect towards the crew.
 

atrdriver

Living in Paradise
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Posts
9,271
Total Time
5000+
Hmmm, don't know how the autopilot would have stayed on all the way till impact?
It could not have, at least as long as the stick shaker fired, which the NTSB has already said it did. It's a certification thing that the A/P disconnects when the shaker activates.
 
Top