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Career after washing out of 121 training

Steve

Curtis Malone
Joined
May 6, 2002
Posts
737
Total Time
1170
To say the last few weeks have been depressing would be the understatement of the century.

I washed out of training last month with Eagle. Training was challenging after CFI'ing for the last 2 years in Texas but I made it to the checkride with a few bumps along the way, and Busted. I was completely tense and knew it. No excuses, I F'ed up. Was given 1 sessions of retraining after which the instructor recommending 1 more before send me for the retest. I got word the next day to report to the office of the Director of training and was given an option to resign or i'd be let go.

I came to training with a good attitude,"hat in my hands" approach, ready to be a sponge and give it my all. Did well during ground school and really loved studying with the guys, practicing flows, keeping ahead of the material with my study groups (not so much to burn out, we had our time to cool off with a cold one). I feel I gave it my all. I find myself looking back thinking "what could I have done differently" . I had some trouble getting adjusted to the glass in the ERJ (never flew any glass before) and seemed to start off struggling in the sim.

I'd considered myself very focused on my career and now find myself thinking its FUBR. Any advice you guys/gals can share would be greatly appreciated.

Steve

I'm sure i'll get some replys along the lines of "you suck go work at mcdonalds" and I thank you guys for it in advance. If nothing else it'll help keep me as humble.
 

BoilerUP

Citation style...
Joined
Nov 11, 2003
Posts
5,311
Total Time
1500+
You don't suck, and you will get by. This may be a blessing in disguise and you just don't know it yet.

Take this as an opportunity to go to a 135 carrier, either passengers flying King Airs and Lears/Citations or flying Barons hauling night freight. Keep flying and keep making steps up that career ladder...you'll be fine.

Good luck!
 

711-24-7

Well-known member
Joined
May 5, 2004
Posts
229
Total Time
????
Like he said you don't suck, it just wasn't your turn!!! Something good will turn out of this keep your head up, and stick with it!!!
 

Terry Hunter

Silence!
Joined
Nov 22, 2004
Posts
297
Total Time
<0>
First off, I applaud your desire to face this head-on by asking for advice on this. Second, hang in there - you could be in a far worse scenario.

If you are jumping from CFI to regional, it is by far, IMHO the most difficult jump throughout the flying career - the pace accelerates well beyond one's expectations.

I was inspired by a mainstream regional that washout a friend, only to tell him "get more experience, let's try this again in a year." He did, they rehired him, now he's a Captain.

Here's what I would do... go back to where you were instructing for the short term. Then consider buying some additional twin time or doing a 135 job. Then be patient as you flood the market with resumes. Good news is that everyone is still hiring like crazy, so you could be much worse off. When you get called for the interview, you can discuss this incident in an incredible positive way.

And I always lay off the sauce while in training, it will only dilute the brain - save it until after the checkride.

Good luck - you are not alone:
http://forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?t=109465
http://forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?t=107233
http://forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?t=102815
http://forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?t=107540
http://forums.flightinfo.com/showthread.php?t=106477

Let us know how things go....
 

Caspian27

Will Ski For Food
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Posts
207
Total Time
4000+
I agree with Boiler. 135 is the way to go right now. It's not the end of the world! Keep flying, keep your good attitude and good things will happen!
 

tathepilot

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 5, 2003
Posts
884
Total Time
None
Keep your head up, keep going.. My sim partner washed out last year. It was his blessing in disguise.. Two months later he is in training at a better job making more money..

Learn from your mistakes..

Never regret the things that you have done, regret the things you don't do..
 

eaglefly

Banned
Well-known member
Joined
May 4, 2002
Posts
784
Total Time
10,000
To say the last few weeks have been depressing would be the understatement of the century.

I washed out of training last month with Eagle. Training was challenging after CFI'ing for the last 2 years in Texas but I made it to the checkride with a few bumps along the way, and Busted. I was completely tense and knew it. No excuses, I F'ed up. Was given 1 sessions of retraining after which the instructor recommending 1 more before send me for the retest. I got word the next day to report to the office of the Director of training and was given an option to resign or i'd be let go.

I came to training with a good attitude,"hat in my hands" approach, ready to be a sponge and give it my all. Did well during ground school and really loved studying with the guys, practicing flows, keeping ahead of the material with my study groups (not so much to burn out, we had our time to cool off with a cold one). I feel I gave it my all. I find myself looking back thinking "what could I have done differently" . I had some trouble getting adjusted to the glass in the ERJ (never flew any glass before) and seemed to start off struggling in the sim.

I'd considered myself very focused on my career and now find myself thinking its FUBR. Any advice you guys/gals can share would be greatly appreciated.

Steve

I'm sure i'll get some replys along the lines of "you suck go work at mcdonalds" and I thank you guys for it in advance. If nothing else it'll help keep me as humble.

Obstacles are part of life.........so are failures. The industry has plenty of successful pilots with busted rides in their past. YOU can choose to see this as a career stopping event or choose to see the obstacle as only temporary.

Is it possible that the obstacle in this situation wasn't lack of ability, but anxiety ?

Checkitis in airline simulators is fairly common. Being relatively inexperienced didn't help. I've flown with people who were basket cases in the sim and fine on the line.

Keep moving forward and in due time this will be behind you. The REAL faliure would be to allow a setback to turn you around moving backward.
 
Last edited:

PilotBTS1972

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2005
Posts
9
Total Time
920
Don't give up man. I busted out of training on IOE with a 121 carrier (TransStates) in the summer of 2005. I ended up flight instructing (Again) for 6 months, then got a job with a 135 operator for a year flying a Caravan and have been with Chautauqua flying the 145 for just over a year now. When I was hired at Transtates I had just over 800 hours and I was not ready. When I interviewed with Chauataqua, I had 2000 hrs and felt more than prepared to handle the training, plus the interview panel seemed to like my persistence and liked the fact that I used the 135 opportunity to continue to build upon my flying skills. The additional 1200 hours and the 135 flying were a blessing in disguise. Just hang in there - it will work out if you want it bad enough. Just be honest, own up to the bust and don't make excuses.
 

oceandude

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 22, 2005
Posts
177
Total Time
8000
you are not the first and wont be the last. you seem to have a good attitude. I am thinking next time around just relax a bit. after all, its just a big video game. :)
 

Amish RakeFight

Registered Loser
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Posts
8,006
Total Time
.
Persistence makes up for talent any day.

I would definantely not walk away from aviation. The next gig you get, you'll have a more relaxed attitude since you've been exposed to the the worst of it; that being canned.

Like the others have said, get yourself into some 135 flying and maybe even enroll in one of those RJ courses available. Less stress and pressure learning in the outside training environment where you're the customer, not a probationary guy with lots to lose if you don't move along at the expected pace.

More CFIing will just keep you insane. I think an RJ course and perhaps some 135 flying will make you a much more confident and prepared candidate at the next regional.

You could be back in 121 training in as little as 4 months from now.

Good luck and it sounds like you're an honest hard working guy. Be prepared to lose a few battles in order to win the war.
 

mamba20

Do what now?
Joined
Nov 27, 2004
Posts
1,030
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000000
Bravo man, you seem to be taking a very level headed and mature additude toward this. M condolences that you didn't make it through. Your not the first and you won't be the last.

Making the jump from 172's to a jet in the airline enviorment it tough and its for that reason that most people do some sort of lower lever 135 or part 91 flying first just to get some experience working with the IFR system a bit more, but more importantly dealing with all the munusha that you deal with daily with the airlines. I dont know of very many people who made the jump from CFI to RJ. Keep your chin up and keep your feelers out, either with other regionals or 135/91 companies.

MOST important, when asked about it in an interview tell them the same thing that you told all of us. Don't be ashamed of it or try to make it sound different then it really is.

When I went for my initial PVT pilot ride my instructor told me that there are two kinds of pilots. Those that have busted a check ride and those that will.

Please keep us posted on where you land and I'm sure you will find that you land on your feet.
 

Fedora

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Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Posts
260
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15000+
Been there, done that, got the t-shirt. My problem was I had been flying a tanker as a civilian contractor pilot for 7 years. Can you say Day-VFR? Spooling up in a part 121 training simulator was not the easiest thing I have ever done. I'd say it might not have been the glass that made it more difficult, but I'm thinking that perhaps the instrument skills (like mine) were a bit rusty after 2 years of CFI flying in Texas. Shake it off and move on, and perhaps buy a little box time before the next attempt. Good Luck, I think you'll do fine.
 

Flybet3

Fly for me! Get my Bonus!
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Posts
1,745
Total Time
plenty
I'm sure i'll get some replys along the lines of "you suck go work at mcdonalds" and I thank you guys for it in advance. If nothing else it'll help keep me as humble.

You're not a loser bro, but I would look into the McD's thing. I heard managers make OK money :p
But in all seriousness, it's not the end of the world. Try flying some freight, lot's of freighter companies are paying OK money now. Ameriflight was recently hiring for Dallas, and Lubbock base. Check them out. Good luck
 

av8tor4239

Well-known member
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Jul 6, 2004
Posts
768
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1
Everything happens for a reason.. the reason might not be clear to you now, but you will be 65 someday sittinging on your porch with a big fat bob marley doobie looking back laughing at the fact that you "almost went to eagle".. you will be glad you did not go there
 

Dan Roman

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 10, 2004
Posts
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I was a check airmen for awhile, so I have a little experience with training.
So I'll make a few obsevations that seem relavant to you.
EVERYBODY has good days and bad. As a new hire, anyone can get behind the power curve and there simply is not enough time to sort it out. I know plenty of pilots that have a story like you, perservered and are now jet Captains somewere else. In training it's not so much whether you make mistakes or not, it's how you handle it. By your posting it sounds like you are handling it spot on with a very good attitude. (like I said, in a new hire situation, especially new to glass, it can happen to anyone). Learn and grow from this (it sounds like you are) and you will be better than those who have never dealt with your situation. As everyone says, it's highly likely you'll look back on this in a few years and be glad it happened, although I'm sure you are having a hard time believing that now. Good luck and keep flying.
 

MOCO

Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2006
Posts
20
Everything happens for a reason! Yeah it sucks to hear that now but it's TRUE!

First of all, having been an avid flightinfo junkie for the past few year years this is only my sixth post. I was moved by how brave your initital post was regarding your training bust and for seeking advice.
Also, I am very moved by how CONSTUCTIVE the input has been been by all the pilots offering such sage advice.
On the "everything happens for a reason vein", I interveiwed with ATA in in 2001 and did not receive the job offer. After feeling sorry for myself for a week I decided to go for it, get the 737 type for SWA and do everything possible to secure an interview. Long story short I was hired by SWA six years ago and couldn't be happier. Hang in there, everything happens for a reason. In closing we carried two ATA pilots today who ferried the LAST ATA jet to Tucson today; very sad.
 

Captainzero1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 29, 2005
Posts
222
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3200
'Obstacles are those frightful things we see when we take our eyes of our goals'

Pick yourself up and go on, things truly happen for a reason.
 
S

sunlitpath

Come on Back

You can always come back. If you were hirable at Eagle, you are hirable at any regional airline. Training departments vary greatly in our industry. Consider coming to ASA. The training is second to none! They certainly won't ask you to leave after 8 or 10 sims. They do 99% of the screening at the door.
 
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