MEI Questions

Immune83

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I'm getting my MEI soon, should be an easy ride BUT...
  1. Any advice you wish you would have known before hand?
  2. How was your check ride, what maneuvers did you have to do?
  3. What questions were you asked in the oral?
  4. Was everything as expected or were you thrown a curve ball?
Thanks
 

ALIMBO

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Where you doing your training at? What type of plane you doing it in? How nice is that King Air GTi? They look amazing.
 

Immune83

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At Clydes in Arlington probably in a BE-95.

The Gti is freakin sweet, I wish they had the Garmin G1000 package but we have the Collins ProLine 21 instead, still very good but not as user friendly imo.

C'mon people, who has an MEI gouge...
 
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Amish RakeFight

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C'mon people, who has an MEI gouge...
It's called the PTS, if you haven't forgotten.

Bascially, it's a MEL ride with a drag demo. Load up the plane with drag (gear flaps, etc.) and demonstrate the effects.
 

ALIMBO

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I was waiting for someone else to state that lol.
 

brokeflyer

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make sure you stuff your foot behind the rudder on the vmc demo.....
 

ALIMBO

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Just trim it out don't make your life harder.
 

ALIMBO

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During my Comm Multi I had to do unusual attitudes. That was definetly not in the PTS.
 

brokeflyer

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During my Comm Multi I had to do unusual attitudes. That was definetly not in the PTS.

It's in the instrument PTS.....unless you don't instrument privledges with your multi.

section IV. subpart B.
 

AC560

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At Clydes in Arlington probably in a BE-95.
1.) Don't sit on Bob's golf cart unless he gives you permission.
2.) Drink lots of coffee so you can stay awake flying with Glenn.
3.) If you get The Hammer as your DE fly a perfect pattern and remember the paint on the center line is for the nosewheel only. Also he is a Harley freak any discussion of Harley's at anytime vastly improves everything.

Short of uncontrolled flight into terrain you should pass. They have a decent program down there in my opinion.
 

avbug

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I'm getting my MEI soon, should be an easy ride BUT...

C'mon people, who has an MEI gouge...
Why worry about it if it's such as "easy ride?"

If you're going somewhere else...well...you'd do well not to approach any of your flight training as though it's an "easy ride." Take it seriously. Study.

Just trim it out don't make your life harder.
This from an individual who doesn't have a multi engine instructor rating, and who isn't a flight instructor? Really? Just "trim it out" when training a student to fly a multi engine airplane? That's your advice and counsel for giving multi-engine flight instruction?? This, after you just said...

During my Comm Multi I had to do unusual attitudes. That was definetly not in the PTS.
Upgrading to a commercial from a private pilot certificate with instrument privileges, and you wonder why you might have to demonstrate instrument proficiency at the commercial level, genius? And you're in the process of obtaining your CFII, are you? What a prize a potential student has in you.

It's okay...just make it wasy on yourself, trim it out, right?

What would you say if you actually had multi engine instructor privileges? Or any instructor privileges for that matter?

As for the original question, remember that you're undertaking a rating which permits you to pass on some critical skills, like any instructor rating. Bear in mind that you have a short time with any student to pass along information that must enable him or her to operate safely in your absence.

One of the key issues in teaching multi engine operation in a light twin is convincingly demonstrating control, to include an intuitive response to a low speed loss of control situation. As an instructor in a single engine airplane, you've taught use of the aerodynamic controls to rectify a control issue. The student is taught to save the airplane with rudder and elevator and ailerons.

In a multi engine airplane, the full aerodynamic limits are reached, and the aircraft still may depart controlled flight because of assymetrical thrust. Convincing the student to retard the power on the good engine at the appropriate time is a response that may save the student's life. Doing so in a way that preserves your own while teaching these principles is the key to providing proper multi engine instruction.

Blocking the rudder to prevent the student being able to use full rudder during Vmc demostrations is a wise technique that enables you to have some rudder reserve as a safety device; the student gets some rudder, but you get the rest, by preventing the student from using full rudder; the airplane begins to depart at a higher speed, which means you have aerodynamic control in reserve for the ham-fisted or slower student. Safety in your pocket.

Too often multi engine instruction is approaches as though assymetrical control is the only part of the process, and it's not. Often the airplane in use will be the heaviest and most complex that the student has yet seen. This is the time to remember primacy of learning, and that the lessons you teach here will be long remembered. Teaching systems knowledge is very important at this point, and often neglected. Teaching the student to use the increased performance under power, and to understand the reduced performance without power, is also very important.

Teaching the student to maintain centerline, for example, is important...it was important as a single engine instructor, but now with propellers closer to taxiway lights and a wider wingspan, it's more important. Before you were able to teach a power off glide, but now the glide ratio is drastically reduced, and thus energy management is more imporant than ever. Advance planning on climbs and descents is important to teach.

Too often multi engine training is restricted to control with one engine inoperative...which leads people to think it should be an "easy ride." It shouldn't be an easy ride. It should be thorough.

Fuel mismanagement continues to be problematic, and fuel management in many light twins only complicates matters. Multiple tanks, crossfeeding, crossflowing, etc, can't just be brushed over; these must be convincingly taught so that the student understands it isn't an "easy ride." Teach the student to take it seriously.

Don't approach your training, your rating, or the duties that come with it as an easy ride. It shouldn't be.
 

Amish RakeFight

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When I did the multi work, rudder trim was NOT allowed. Yeah it hurts, but you've got to practice worst case in a sense. Both my MEI and examiner wouldn't permit the use of trim. It's tough, but you need to be able to accomplish SE flight and approach without using trim. If you can't endure holding the rudder, then you shouldn't be qualified to get the rating. Not all planes will have rudder trim or rudder trim which works. When you actually do have an engine failure, your comfort, force/pressure-familiarity and ability to hold rudder forces as long as necessary become imperative. Learn and practice without the use of trim. Recall that as you reduce power on the operating engine, the required rudder forces are much less and trim is not as necessary.

Years ago, one reason the airlines were hesitant to hire female pilots had to do with concerns as to whether they could handle the strong leg forces required during asymetrical flight.
 

ALIMBO

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Buddy I was upgrading from a Comm ASEL with the multi add on. Look in the PTS. Nobody said it was to hard to fly the plane with no trim. If it's there and you realize how to fly the plane w/o it and with. Then go ahead and use the trim unless the examiner or mei doesn't want you to. In that case it's not the end of the world. It seems to me avbug your assuming things again you need to stop that.
 

avbug

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Alimbo, this is a thread about learning to TEACH in a multi engine airplane...something you don't understand. Considering some of your earlier training failures, this isn't surprising.

Buddy I was upgrading from a Comm ASEL with the multi add on. Look in the PTS.
No...you look in the practical test standards. You are, after all, attempting to become a flight instructor (God help the student who draws the short straw and gets you).

You can't obtain your flight instructor certificate without a commercial pilot certificate, and an instrument rating. You've recently become a commercially certificated pilot. Upgrading your privileges to commercial requires that you demonstrate them to the commercial level. If you want to upgrade a private certificate with airplane, single engine privileges and an instrument rating, you need to be able to demonstrate basic instrument skills in the multi engine airplane. Further, if you're only trying to upgrade to the commercial and are doing it in a single engine airplane, you should expect to be asked to be able to demonstrate recoveries from unusual attitudes in the single engine airplane, too. You hold, after all, an instrument rating, do you not?

Think about it, brightspark. You're holding yourself out as a potential flight instructor now. Try to act like it, stop thinking as though you're a poor excuse for a private pilot, and do attempt to grow something in that space between your ears. At some point you're going to have to stop being 14 years old...and you're going to have to act like it, too.
 
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ALIMBO

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Avbug I don't know what 1940's PTS version your using, but if you look in the Commercial PTS and you are a Commercial Pilot holding an Instrument Rating and go to add on a Commercial Multi you do not I repeat do not need to demonstrate Unusual Attitudes if you get asked to do it by the DE then do it. But, it is not in the PTS. Avbug before trying to use your years of flying to try and spread your knowledge pick up a book an look at the regs. Furthermore you do not even have to demonstrate them for even a commercial asel rating.
 

ALIMBO

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No...you look in the practical test standards.
If you want to upgrade a private certificate with airplane, single engine privileges and an instrument rating, you need to be able to demonstrate basic instrument skills in the multi engine airplane. Further, if you're only trying to upgrade to the commercial and are doing it in a single engine airplane, you should expect to be asked to be able to demonstrate recoveries from unusual attitudes in the single engine airplane, too. You hold, after all, an instrument rating, do you not?
Nobody said anything about what you may be asked to do. Hell you maybe asked to do the approach single engine and go and do the hold under a simulated failed engine too. Does it happen maybe all the time of course not. Avbug you know I don't know what your deal is but something is not right about you. I've recieved a few messages about you from people that apparantly know you well. You don't even want to know what they say. Maybe you should realize your place on this website as just another person that posts on here thats it. You hold no status your no mod your nothing. Don't try an act like your king sh!t around here. Especially when you just got proved wrong by "14 yr old with nothing between his ears."
 

ALIMBO

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Why worry about it if it's such as "easy ride?"

If you're going somewhere else...well...you'd do well not to approach any of your flight training as though it's an "easy ride." Take it seriously. Study.



This from an individual who doesn't have a multi engine instructor rating, and who isn't a flight instructor? Really? Just "trim it out" when training a student to fly a multi engine airplane? That's your advice and counsel for giving multi-engine flight instruction?? This, after you just said...



Upgrading to a commercial from a private pilot certificate with instrument privileges, and you wonder why you might have to demonstrate instrument proficiency at the commercial level, genius? And you're in the process of obtaining your CFII, are you? What a prize a potential student has in you.

It's okay...just make it wasy on yourself, trim it out, right?

What would you say if you actually had multi engine instructor privileges? Or any instructor privileges for that matter?
To the OP this guy is a tool and thinks he knows everything but he doesn't. The Comm Multi add on is in fact easy that is if your not a complete retard. I mean come on if Avbug can do it you can. Just study up and you will be fine. I apologize if this is a sh!t fest because of him and me. See he assumed I was upgrading from private to comm multi. Which wasn't true but he assumes. If I had my MEI and was training a Multi student I would teach them how to fly it without trim and then go ahead and just teach them with the rudder trim. There is enough going on in the plane so make it easy for yourself use the trim. But realize you may not always have rudder trim.
 
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