• This site moved from forums.flightinfo.com to flightinfo.com. Please update your bookmarks.

Difference between "Throttle" and "Thrust Lever"?

gringo

As good as it gets.
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Posts
381
Total Time
~4500
They both do the same thing, but I was taught that with a piston airplane, it's a "throttle", but with a turbine, specifically a jet, they're called "thrust levers".

Can anyone clarify with a refrence to a publication?

Tanks
 

CUEBOAT

HomeBaseBKLYN
Joined
Aug 14, 2003
Posts
317
Total Time
25yrs
well, since a jet doesnt have a throttle body in the engine this is why the "go" lever isnt called a throttle. The thrust lever adds thrust hence the name.
 

Ollie

COVERED IN ROUNDUP
Joined
Dec 8, 2004
Posts
77
Total Time
GMT-10
I think it's more manufacturer's preference than anything. I've flown some turboprops and turbine helos that had "throttles." I've also flown some turbine aircraft that had PCL's and ECL's. It just depends.
 

CUEBOAT

HomeBaseBKLYN
Joined
Aug 14, 2003
Posts
317
Total Time
25yrs
sweet avatar ollie
 

Rogue5

Adult Swim junkie
Joined
Jul 16, 2002
Posts
882
Total Time
~5k
When I flew the EMB-120 Brasilia they were called "Power Levers" since turboprops have propellers that move mass and thus do "work" in a technical physics-sense. Power was measured in torque and shaft-horsepower. The call on the takeoff roll was "Set Power."

Now in the RJ you have no propellers and an engine whose strength is measure in pounds of thrust. The two things sticking up out of the center pedestal are called "Thrust levers." The call is "Set Thrust."

Although both had a turbine core and an argument could be made that the low-pressure fan on a high-bypass turbofan is just a set of very small propellers, the distinction comes down to how that turbine transmits its energy to the environment: prop or jet.

You can always tell a guy who just came over from the weed-wacker because the calls are wrong for a month or so...
 

User546

The Ultimate Show Stopper
Joined
Jan 24, 2004
Posts
1,959
Total Time
+1500
Thrust Levers are Throttles, and Throttles are Thrust Levers. It's just whats up front that they're controlling that makes the difference (Piston vs. Turbine).

Another good way to look at it is if you don't have a mixture lever/control up front, you probably should call it a Thrust Lever!

Rogue gives the best explanation of it.
 

GogglesPisano

Pawn, in game of life
Joined
Oct 20, 2003
Posts
3,939
Total Time
enough
A throttle restricts airflow (like when old people say "I'll throttle that SOB!") This is what happens in a piston engine. Without a throttle to control airflow into the engine the engine would overspeed and eventually fail.


There is no throttle in a turbine engine. Instead, the way to control power output is through the metering of fuel -- hence a more simple name for the lever.
 

English

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
3,374
Total Time
1
GogglesPisano said:
There is no throttle in a turbine engine.
Tell Cessna that.
 

Ollie

COVERED IN ROUNDUP
Joined
Dec 8, 2004
Posts
77
Total Time
GMT-10
I don't think that the original poster was asking whether or not there is a traditional throttle body attached to a turbine engine. He's asking about the nomenclature of the control inside the cockpit that controls the engine output/condition. There are a number of turbine powered aircraft that feature a control called the "throttle," named such by the aicraft's manufacturer. Whether it's called a throttle, thrust control, thrust lever, power lever, engine condition lever, power condition lever, etc. depends on what the aircraft manufacturer decides to call it. It's just not a matter of whether or not the power is piston or turbine.
 

TonyC

Frederick's Happy Face
Joined
Oct 21, 2002
Posts
3,050
Total Time
>8,000
English said:
Tell Cessna that.
That's exactly what i was thinking!

I doubt you had the T-37 in mind, but I was thinking of the Boldface that is forever ingrained in the core of my noggin'. Let's see if I can fathom re-learning those with "Thrust Lever(s)" instead of "Throttle(s)"


SINGLE SPIN RECOVERY

THRUST LEVERS - IDLE
RUDDER and AILERONS - NEUTRAL
....


No, no, no... that just doesn't have the correct rhythm! We'd never pull it off with the substitution. Besides, then it'd be 44 words instead of 43. No!! They definitely have to be THROTTLES. Definitely! :)


On a related note... I recall being slightly amused when I first noticed the decal placard on the Throttle quadrant (see there, another throttle) of the KC/EC/RC-135s. There alongside the other pertinent markings was an arrow pointing toward the nose of the airplane labeled "Increase Thrust." (In fact, there may have been two, one on each side.) I often wondered who could have become confused, and how they might have become confused about which way to push the levers, whatever they called 'em, to increase thrust.

Boeing calls 'em Throttles, at least they did when I was flying last night. :)
 

FoxBravo

Was that for us?
Joined
Jun 10, 2005
Posts
19
Total Time
.1
I've always wondered if they are thrust levers......why do we have an auto throttle system? Can't Boeing make up their mind either?
 

GogglesPisano

Pawn, in game of life
Joined
Oct 20, 2003
Posts
3,939
Total Time
enough
FoxBravo said:
I've always wondered if they are thrust levers......why do we have an auto throttle system? Can't Boeing make up their mind either?
Airbus labelled it an "autothrust" system.
 

gringo

As good as it gets.
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Posts
381
Total Time
~4500
Yeah, I was simply asking about proper nomenclature- on the RJ, we called them "thrust levers", but on the DC-10, we call them "throttles"- apparently Douglas did this with all of their airplanes.

Just curious- but I did like the history behind the "I'll throttle him" phrase...
 

TonyC

Frederick's Happy Face
Joined
Oct 21, 2002
Posts
3,050
Total Time
>8,000
TonyC said:
On a related note... I recall being slightly amused when I first noticed the decal placard on the Throttle quadrant (see there, another throttle) of the KC/EC/RC-135s. There alongside the other pertinent markings was an arrow pointing toward the nose of the airplane labeled "Increase Thrust." (In fact, there may have been two, one on each side.) I often wondered who could have become confused, and how they might have become confused about which way to push the levers, whatever they called 'em, to increase thrust.

Boeing calls 'em Throttles, at least they did when I was flying last night. :)
HA! I found the same "decal" placard on the 727 throttle quadrant today "<---- INCREASE THRUST". I hadn't noticed it before.

Makes ya wonder - - who woulda thunk ta move 'em the other direction to increase thrust?!?!


:confused:


:)



.
 

Rez O. Lewshun

Save the Profession
Joined
Jan 19, 2004
Posts
13,422
Total Time
X>X
Anyone who quotes himself is a flightinfo junkie.

Tony C.,

I hope for all of our sakes when you found this in the jet you didn't jump up and down in your seat and say to the other two "I can't wait to tell the guys at flightinfo!!"
 

TonyC

Frederick's Happy Face
Joined
Oct 21, 2002
Posts
3,050
Total Time
>8,000
Rez O. Lewshun said:
Anyone who quotes himself is a flightinfo junkie.

Tony C.,

I hope for all of our sakes when you found this in the jet you didn't jump up and down in your seat and say to the other two "I can't wait to tell the guys at flightinfo!!"
Guilty as charged.


I did get a strange look when I just started chuckling.

:)



.
 

nosehair

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 22, 2003
Posts
1,238
Total Time
24/7
TonyC said:
SINGLE SPIN RECOVERY

THRUST LEVERS - IDLE
RUDDER and AILERONS - NEUTRAL
....


No, no, no... that just doesn't have the correct rhythm! We'd never pull it off with the substitution. Besides, then it'd be 44 words instead of 43. No!! They definitely have to be THROTTLES. Definitely! :)
....Now that's entertainment!!...I like this guy.
 

Donsa320

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 10, 2004
Posts
521
Total Time
32,000
TonyC said:
HA! I found the same "decal" placard on the 727 throttle quadrant today "<---- INCREASE THRUST". I hadn't noticed it before.

Makes ya wonder - - who woulda thunk ta move 'em the other direction to increase thrust?!?!


:confused:

:)

Fact is...on steam locomotives you pull the throttle BACK to increase speed and of course you move it FORWARD to slow...go figure, but they had them first circa 1830 <big grin>

~DC
 
Top