airline pilot murders ex-wife...

dondk

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I do not condone Mark's behavior, no one knows what SHE "may" have said, "may" have done to push that "one" button that "may" have drove him over the edge...

It's is not like all women are perfect and NEVER push a button or two...

Bottom line.. no one knows... She may have been a pure angel, OR she may have been a biatch on wheels...

What he did was wrong, WHY he did it is still the mystery that will NEVER be answered...
 

JayDub

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dondk said:
I do not condone Mark's behavior, no one knows what SHE "may" have said, "may" have done to push that "one" button that "may" have drove him over the edge...

It's is not like all women are perfect and NEVER push a button or two...

Bottom line.. no one knows... She may have been a pure angel, OR she may have been a biatch on wheels...

What he did was wrong, WHY he did it is still the mystery that will NEVER be answered...

Isn't that about the same as saying some women were asking to be raped by the way they dress? So, basically as I read your comments, someone is well within their rights to do the same to you, provided you do something to annoy them? Or is it ok only if you annoy them for too long (with that length of time to be decided by them, of course)? So, basically, the penalty for annoying someone is death. Yeeaaahhh, that makes sense (sarcasm).

Why can't we try to get the message out that initiating physical violence is never ok? Why can't we just do unto others as we'd want to have done to us?

Respectfully,

JayDub
 

CatYaaak

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dondk said:
I knew Mark too.. A good person from what I knew of him...

My comments on this are simple...

There are THREE sideS to this story, His, Her's and the truth.. Unfortunately we will NEVER know any side of the story. To suggest otherwise is simply foolish and to those who made subjective opinions... your no better than the news report who gave just one side to the story.

No one knows what happened, no one knows the WHOLE story.

Mark left a son without parents and a new wife without a husband and people guessing what took place.

Not to change this into a child support thread.. walk in a man's shoes first before pointing the finger... Know one will ever know what he was thinking, IF he was thinking..

She's dead. By his hand. Don't say we'll NEVER know any side to the story, because we know that one don't we? That's a pretty friggin' big Truth! I can't imagine how life must be for you, if you can't make a VALUE JUDGEMENT that murder is wrong. As humans we're given brains to do that very sort of thing. Just because you happened to know the guy doesn't make it one of those "gray area" things where it's okay to avoid making it. If her killing wasn't justifiable...and if you can tell or it comes out that she tried to kill him and he was acting in self-defense at the time I'll happily change my opinon...then it's MURDER. Get it?

If he indeed owed that much child support (and if it was his son he owed it) then I'll point the finger at him because I walk in his shoes; he was a worthless deadbeat. It's bad enough 'if he divorced his wife just because she got pregnant, but to not support your own son...even if she was Super Psychobitch....is lower than low. That's another one of those value judgement things.

On neither of these issues..child support or murder...does he sound like a "good person". You might want to start re-evaluating your subjective opinon of him.



And if her son was his too, l
 

dondk

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Let me clarify my position...

What happened was wrong, no doubt or question about it, people died needlessly.

I "knew" Mark, I did not "KNOW" Mark. What I "knew" of Mark I would not think he was capable of these actions. Others have agreed that this was out of his character. Mark did not appear to be cold, calculating, or mentally unstable.

Was this act an act of passion rather than a cold, calculated murder? I would think so, if it was something other.. he had 19 years to do it.. Why wait? If he hated her that much... he had plently of time and opportunity to do the act he did.

If he indeed owed that much child support (and if it was his son he owed it) then I'll point the finger at him because I walk in his shoes; he was a worthless deadbeat. It's bad enough 'if he divorced his wife just because she got pregnant, but to not support your own son...even if she was Super Psychobitch....is lower than low. That's another one of those value judgement things.


Since you say you walk in his shoes.. tell me why he divorced his wife, why he refused (if that is truly the case) to pay child support, and if she was that psychobitch. These are sides to the story that are purely hearsay. Ever play telephone in grade school? This is the same thing.. WE, those who are making VALUE judgements on the dead parties, making assumptions we know why he did what he did and why she died like she did. I am not trying to make excuses for Marks behavior, it was wrong no matter what.

What happened is a tragedy, it should have never happened, but it did.. the reason for the tragedy will never really be known or understood.

Why can't we try to get the message out that initiating physical violence is never ok? Why can't we just do unto others as we'd want to have done to us?


I agree 100%... well stated...
 
Last edited:

KigAir

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redd said:
KingAir,

The Fed Ex pilot now owns two dropzones, one is in Arizona. The story behind his murdering his ex-wife, who was also a pilot, was pretty sordid.

He apparantly had an OJ type trial where everyone assumed he would be convicted, but somehow he wasn't.

I've heard rumours that he was covering up the crime for his son.
 

redd

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Back in 1991 when the murder was committed, the son would have been far too young to transport his mom from her front door to a back highway in another state, beat her to death and set the van on fire with Jet-A. He was young enough to need a nanny, who was the alleged co-conspirator/girlfriend with Mullins. Mullins would be about 57 now.

This all happened before the internet was in use, so uncovering details and actual articles is hard unless you have access to news databases. But the murder case had enough factual appeal for A&E to use it as an example of miscarried justice.
-------
THE SEAMY SIDE - A LURID LOOK AT A MEMPHIS MURDER:[Final Edition]
Tom Walter. The Commercial Appeal
Copyright Memphis Publishing Company Sep 13, 2002

In prose more purple than pious, City Confidential hits the soft underbelly of Memphis and rips away its pretense to propriety, slathering its secrets across a dumbfounded piece of toast called America.
Sorry. City Confidential will do that.
Memphis, Burning Betrayal uses the prose of pulp fiction to illuminate the Holly Mullins murder case of 1991.
"We try to look for cases that aren't just random, gruesome murders," said executive producer Geoff Proud. "Here, it was a case that made you go 'What the . . .'"
What indeed.
Mullins, a Federal Express pilot, was found dead in a burned-out van in Mississippi. It was determined that she died of blunt trauma to the head before the van burned.
Her husband, Michael Mullins, also was a Federal Express pilot. Holly became a born-again Christian, and she and Michael began to disagree about how to raise their children. They started bitter divorce proceedings. Michael Mullins also had taken up with his son's nanny, Carol Pinkerton.
In 1991, Holly flew a FedEx flight to Maine and the next night headed home. She never was seen alive again.
A truck driver found a badly burned van with a body in it on a Mississippi road. It was Holly.
Two years passed and no charges were made. Then Carol Pinkerton came forward and told investigators that Michael told her he had killed Holly.
The evidence - including burns on Michael's hands - seemed overwhelming. But a jury returned a not guilty verdict after less than an hour's deliberation.
It's a lurid story, told luridly. For instance:
"In 1991, Memphis's violent past would return like a parcel without postage," narrator Paul Winfield says.
Then, leading into a discussion of the murder, Winfield says, "In Memphis, even justice doesn't come absolutely, positively overnight."
Or, "Michael's moves on Holly were faster than his moves in the air."
Or this: "(Memphis is) a place where they serve beer on the street and people are knee-deep in booze. . . . Mullins was knee- deep in trouble."
How does the show describe Pinkerton? She got the nanny's job answering an ad on Christian radio, but she was "a devil in a house dress."
Pinkerton was a dream witness - for the defense.
She was a recovering drug addict who reportedly got phone messages from Holly after her death and who had a history of ratting on her men.
Pinkerton did the prosecution no favors. In the program, defense attorney Leslie Ballin says the Mullins defense came down to demonstrating the state couldn't prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Michael committed the crime.
It's a lot of story, especially considering that about 20 minutes of the episode is devoted to background on Memphis, emphasizing drinking, eating, music and drinking some more. (There are a ton of shots of folks on Beale Street.)
The language and tone of the piece is just this side of flippant. Writer Brett O'Bourke learned all the wrong lessons from Raymond Chandler. Heck, he even learned the wrong lessons from Mickey Spillane.
"We try to overdo it a little bit," executive producer Proud said. "There are some of these shows out there that are so earnest. Someone got killed here, and we don't want to make fun of them; there is a little bit more dark humor than in other true crime shows."
The story is told in ominous tones, on purpose.
"This case was just one bizarre thing after another. The way Paul Winfield reads them and the way we try to tell them, you know something bad is going to happen. If he says they looked like a perfect couple, you know they weren't."
-- What: City Confidential: Memphis, Burning Betrayal
-- When: 8 p.m. Sunday
-- Where: A&E

------------------------------------

MULLINS RETURNS TO PILOT JOB AT FEDEX:[Final Edition]
Lawrence Buser Dave Hirschman-The Commercial Appeal.

Copyright Memphis Publishing Company Feb 24, 1995


FedEx pilot Howard Michael Mullins, who was acquitted last year of killing his wife, has been reinstated, company officials said Thursda
Mullins, a 727 captain, had been suspended from the company since June 1993 when he was charged with the 1991 murder of his wife Holly Ann Fulton Mullins, who also was a Federal Express pilot.
Last month, Mullins was cleared of arson charges in the case, apparently removing the last obstacle to regaining his job.
"I have no comment at all," Mullins said Thursday evening.
Company spokesman Bill Carroll confirmed that Mullins has been reinstated, but that the question of back pay was considered a personal issue that would not be made public.
Mullins, 48, who was hired by FedEx in 1979, was earning more than $100,000 a year when he was suspended.
His primary income has been through a skydiving business he operates in Fayette County.
Holly Mullins, 36, was found beaten to death inside her burning van Aug. 30, 1991, in DeSoto County.
At the time, she and her husband were in the midst of a bitter fight over children and property.
Mullins was not charged until nearly two years later, and last March a Criminal Court jury in Memphis acquitted him of capital murder.
Earlier this month, a judge in DeSoto County acquitted him of arson charges in connection with the burned van.
Mullins was going through classroom training Thursday, preparing to resume his job in the cockpit.
Reaction to his return was mixed.
Some female FedEx pilots and friends of Holly Mullins were angry and said they would request not to fly with Mullins.
FedEx keeps a computerized list of pilots who, for personal reasons, have asked not to fly with each other.
The list was not designed to accommodate more than a few names per individual. Also, in situations where the company needs to assemble a crew quickly for a last-minute flight, schedulers can disregard the preference list.
 

KingCast

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She's dead. By his hand. Don't say we'll NEVER know any side to the story, because we know that one don't we? That's a pretty friggin' big Truth! I can't imagine how life must be for you, if you can't make a VALUE JUDGEMENT that murder is wrong. As humans we're given brains to do that very sort of thing. Just because you happened to know the guy doesn't make it one of those "gray area" things where it's okay to avoid making it. If her killing wasn't justifiable...and if you can tell or it comes out that she tried to kill him and he was acting in self-defense at the time I'll happily change my opinon...then it's MURDER. Get it?

If he indeed owed that much child support (and if it was his son he owed it) then I'll point the finger at him because I walk in his shoes; he was a worthless deadbeat. It's bad enough 'if he divorced his wife just because she got pregnant, but to not support your own son...even if she was Super Psychobitch....is lower than low. That's another one of those value judgement things.

On neither of these issues..child support or murder...does he sound like a "good person". You might want to start re-evaluating your subjective opinon of him.



And if her son was his too, l
Yah I got you on this one my friend. He got away with it.
 

belchfire

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Holy Zombie Threads Batman!

If you want to resurrect something, how 'bout contributing to the Diarrhea in a Freighter thread-that one should keep flowing!
 
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