Why do passengers

OneBadLT123

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always ignore the safety brief at the beginning of each flight? I just arrived in DEN, and on my last flight i noticed only a small handful of passengers even bothered to pay attention. They would rather read their precious Cosmo magazine or whatever. Then if something happens, pure panic and lack of understanding on what’s going on.

Is it me, or does anyone else notice this?
 

JumpJetter

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cause if you fly alot, they always say the same thing. How many times do YOU need to be told how to fasten your seat belt, how to pull an O2 mask to your face, and that your closest exit may be behind you?
 

TonyC

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JumpJetter said:
How many times do YOU need to be told how to fasten your seat belt, how to pull an O2 mask to your face, and that your closest exit may be behind you?
Behind me?!?!?


No way!



:)




.
 

MFRskyknight

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OneBadLT123 said:
I just arrived in DEN, and on my last flight i noticed only a small handful of passengers even bothered to pay attention. They would rather read their precious Cosmo magazine or whatever...
That "small handful" = first time flyers.

Everyone else = everyone else.

I know I don't bother to pay attention.... unless the FA happens to have some bodacious ta-tas... :D

MFR
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501261

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JumpJetter said:
cause if you fly alot, they always say the same thing. How many times do YOU need to be told how to fasten your seat belt, how to pull an O2 mask to your face, and that your closest exit may be behind you?
As much as it pains me to listen, I always try to make it appear that I'm paying attention.

It's simply respectful to our fellow crewmembers.
 

TonyC

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501261 said:
As much as it pains me to listen, I always try to make it appear that I'm paying attention.

It's simply respectful to our fellow crewmembers.
Me, too. I'm sure that's why I get the special treatment: my very own bag of nuts/pretzels/chips/whatever that mess is.



Beisdes, I often tend to forget whether tampering with a smoke detector is an offense, or just offensive. I'm always glad when they clear up that issue.


:)





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Immelman

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When I have traveled for business I am often on a flight -or two- each day.... do that for a week and see if you still pay attention to the briefing. If it is an aircraft type I have never ridden in, I will review the briefing card to see if there are any quirks with opening the doors, and if it is an overwater flight, to see how their lifejackets actually fasten on.
 

Av8rPHX

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Kind of reminds me of the George Carlin skit "Airline Announcements". I agree with what a previous poster stated, I will appear to pay attention out of respect to the crewmembers, even though as a commuter I hear the same thing every 4-5 days. What really gets me is after they make the announcement about the "flight deck door is for authorized personnel only".. people STILL try to open it thinking it is the forward lav. It even says FLIGHT DECK on the door!!!!! :rolleyes:

PS: if anyone is interested in the Carlin bit, pm me for it.
 
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Tarzan

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TonyC said:
Me, too. I'm sure that's why I get the special treatment: my very own bag of nuts/pretzels/chips/whatever that mess is.
Always helps when you have a company badge with the CREW thing stuck to it.
 

phil

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I don't think the average person understands what flight deck means really, they probably would understand a sign with the word bathroom and a directional arrow underneath it though!

During the briefing, I always wonder if there could be a better design to fasten those O2 masks to one's head rather than those two pull cords.
 

TonyC

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TiredOfTeaching said:
Always helps when you have a company badge with the CREW thing stuck to it.
Nah, I always put that thing away after I get through the TSA gauntlet. I don't travel in uniform, and I usually check my bags, too, so I arrive at the airplane "incognito." Otherwise, I'd be constantly looking for the monitors to answer the questions - - you know, "Where is the flight from Portland?" I'm always afraid I won't be able to find the correct answer.

I wonder if they know I'm crew just by my devilish good looks and charming personality?





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FracCapt

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phil said:
I don't think the average person understands what flight deck means really
True....but, unfortunately, the PC Nazi's don't allow us to call it the cockpit anymore, which everybody knows it by.
 

Ralgha

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I pay attention out of respect, not because I haven't heard it before. Have you ever given a talk in front of a group of people where not a single one was paying attention? It sucks. I'll give them my attention every time.
 

CA1900

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FracCapt said:
True....but, unfortunately, the PC Nazi's don't allow us to call it the cockpit anymore, which everybody knows it by.
I call it the Bridge, myself. :D
 

UnAnswerd

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Pax can be pure asses at times. A couple weeks ago I was on a flight from IAD to TPA, that had been delayed about 1.5 hours. Apparently, the A320 we were supposed to board had brake problems that couldn't be immediately fixed. We ended up getting a new plane. Once on board, one of the FA's apologized over the intercom for the delay. People just started laughing, joking, and complaining. How moronic can you be??? Would you have rather boarded a plane that had known brake issues??? Whether or not the plane really did have that problem, who knows. But for the Christ's sake, quit your crying.
 

Resume Writer

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Most passengers do not pay attention to the demo. I know even now when I get on a plane, I "count" the number of rows behind me to the exit. Here is why...


When I was an FA, during recurrent they filled the simulator cabin with "smoke," turned out all the lights, and tilted the aircraft at an angle. We had to come from the back galley area forward, (about 10 rows) with people staged in the aircraft grabbing at you, and seat cushions/luggage in the aisle. Let me tell you, it was very eye-opening, disorienting and scary, aside from the fact that you could hardly breathe. I think every passenger should go through that once. They might have a new appreciation for safety and the job the crew does to get them out in an emergency.
Unanswrd - as for the passengers complaining about delays, I just have one saying - "A delay can ruin your day, but a crash can ruin your life!" :D
 

Harmattan96

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JumpJetter said:
... and that your closest exit may be behind you?

Actually, when I get on the passenger side of the cabin, I also take the time to spot where the 200+lbs folks might have been seated, so that I can go perhaps to an exit that may be farther away; but definitly much more accessible.
 

KigAir

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Resume Writer said:
When I was an FA, during recurrent they filled the simulator cabin with "smoke," turned out all the lights, and tilted the aircraft at an angle.
Did you ever get trained on how to react when the pilot turns blue in the face and passes out?
 

Resume Writer

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I remember one particular recurrent where we viewed gruesome pictures and listened to passenger / crew accounts of the U.S. Air jet that landed on the Skywest Metroliner at LAX.


There were some interesting facts that came out of this crash. Some of this information was gathered from surviving passengers and crew members. Other parts were gathered from the position of bodies at the overwing exit.

According to FA and passenger accounts, the left side, forward exit of the aircraft was blocked due to fire. Apparently, this included the Overwing Exit on the left side of the aircraft as well. Further, the forward exit aircraft right was able to be used, but the airplane was at such an attitude that is was difficult to get out - but the passengers could.

As the FAs were yelling to the passengers to come to the forward exit, the passengers were not listening. Two passengers at the overwing exit (males) got into a fist fight over "who" would open the exit. In the mean time, passengers were panicking, not listening to the FAs, and clogged up the overwing exit. An FA in the front of the plane decided to leave her post and try to get the passengers out by getting them to come to the front exit. She was trampled and killed by the passengers.

I cannot remember the exact number of passengers that were found at the overwing exit, but I think it was about 15-16, all in a pile. Had those two passengers not fought over which would open the exit, more people would have lived. I saw the pictures of the charred bodies - they were horrific.

My point in all this? People do not listen - even when in an emergency.

When I was an FA, I had to brief exit row passengers on every flight. I would get all of their attention, explain the exit row criteria, tell them what to do in case of an emergency, and then ask "each" of them for a "verbal confirmation" that they understood what I told them.

It was interesting how many "nods" I would get, to which my response was "a verbal confirmation please." That was sometimes my clue of someone that did not speak English or someone that had no business sitting there. You would also be interested to know that I had passengers with canes, broken legs, small children, etc., that would insist on sitting there. They did not get the meaning of "get people out in an emergency." Of course they were reseated, but it was always a fight.

I could go on about this topic, but it is past my bed time! :)

Kathy
 
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