Speculator's mocking the airlines

General Lee

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Yeah, ya'll are right, it has nothing to do with crappy airline service. Why pay $300 for a round trip ticket when you can pay $5000/hr on a corporate jet? The oil speculators aren't the only ones mocking the airlines. Your best (former)customers have been doing it for years.


At least we know you guys HAVE To fly on airliners too. We can all have fun, and I will try to give PA's to you people when we are delayed, after I eat my Quiznos Sub.....


Bye Bye--General Lee
 

skiandsurf

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Apparently you dont know Jack Schitt. Netjets has grown my mostly corporations getting rid of corporate fleets and buying Quarter Shares ;). The avg 121 pax is still an avg 121 pax.

By the way i have never stepped foot on or attended Riddle, moron.

I remember years ago (early 90s) and while flying on UAL, seeing ads for NetJets in the Hemisphere magazine. I thought how crazy it is, that UAL lets them advertise onboard their plane. Funny thing, now there is no advertising (from NJs) in the Hemisphere magazine.

So yes, your first class pax are now with the fractionals, and yes, the "average" 121 is not going to the fractionals.
 

tomgoodman

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Passengers lie

An Open Letter to All Airlines
... You might find out that airline passengers are more willing to pay up to fly (see the growth of a company like NetJets) when they know it won't be a dreadful experience...

It's been tried by major airlines, and what they found was a loss of revenue. Bob Crandall pointed out years ago that most passengers say they'll gladly pay more for bigger seats, extra legroom, better service etc., then turn around and book the cheapest fare. They'll "pay up" only when they have no other choice.

As for the fractionals, they serve a limited market and inherently cannot expand to cover the public at large, because exclusivity is a major part of their product.
 

Jack Schitt

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At least we know you guys HAVE To fly on airliners too. We can all have fun, and I will try to give PA's to you people when we are delayed, after I eat my Quiznos Sub.....


Bye Bye--General Lee
Does your airline now charge for PA's or is it still free?
 

General Lee

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Does your airline now charge for PA's or is it still free?


Do you still tip YOURSELF when you clean the schitter?


Bye Bye--General Lee
 

BoilerUP

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NetJets provides a good product to their passengers, but it is quite expensive and is NOT more economical than a company-run flight department if they fly more than 200-250 hours per year.

Depending on the nature of one's business, airline service to where you work is may be unreliable, not time effective or just plan unavailable. Not everybody lives or has meetings in a city with an airline hub.

My boss bought an airplane 9 years ago because his TIME was more valuable than his money when it came to growing the business and being able to have some semblance of a family life.

Kind of like Cessna's new marketing campaign...
 
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brainhurts

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Do you still tip YOURSELF when you clean the schitter?


Bye Bye--General Lee
I get the connection. Among the Net Jet boys, this guy was the fastest at cleaning the schitter and got himself a nick name. Jack Schitt. He scrubbed and scrubbed at those "dried on" schittt clumps and developed a technique for neutralizing the odor left by the bowels of the rich. He then may have washed his hands quickly so he could eat the leftover food off the lobster tray. Jack Schitt, it is obvious you are a flamer, and it is great you have a secure job for now, however negative karma works in strange ways. It is only going to take a deep recession to affect your clientele.
 

Daytonaflyer

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It has nothing to do with speculators...Right!

Oil zoomed up to a new record today of $146.90 on false fears of problems with Iran, Nigeria, and a so-called strike at Brazillian oil factories.

If it wasn't the speculators causing the price to rise when any little thing bothers the oil market, then how the h*ll does this keep happening?

I know that I sure as h*ll am not worried about oil disruptions from Brazil or Iran. It's not me that's concerned about it, how about you???
I know the gas pumps won't run empty if Iran test fires some missiles, they probably won't miss one single gas station tanker delivery if the Brazillians go on strike either. The only thing that affects me is when the speculators drive the prices up.
Of course it's the god damn speculators; they're profiting off of all of our pain and they need to be stopped.

Luckily on Thursday June 26, 2008, H.R. 6377 passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 402 to 19 to limit the damage speculators can do on the oil market.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080711/bs_nm/markets_oil_dc
 
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milky

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Oil zoomed up to a new record today of $146.90 on false fears of problems with Iran, Nigeria, and a so-called strike at Brazillian oil factories.

If it wasn't the speculators causing the price to rise when any little thing bothers the oil market, then how the h*ll does this keep happening?

I know that I sure as h*ll am not worried about oil disruptions from Brazil or Iran. It's not me that's concerned about it, how about you???
I know the gas pumps won't run empty if Iran test fires some missiles, they probably won't miss one single gas station tanker delivery if the Brazillians go on strike either. The only thing that affects me is when the speculators drive the prices up.
Of course it's the god damn speculators; they're profiting off of all of our pain and they need to be stopped.

Luckily on Thursday June 26, 2008, H.R. 6377 passed the House of Representatives by a vote of 402 to 19 to limit the damage speculators can do on the oil market.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080711/bs_nm/markets_oil_dc

Honestly, this is one of the most ignorant posts I've ever read. It's representative of this site and what the media has put out to demonize somebody. It's very much a part of the class envy that the Democrat party wants to encourage.

Futures markets are a key component to just about every commodity that is sold in the U.S. (and the world, for that matter). The commodities markets provide a stabilizing effect on the volatile prices that would prevail in most commodities. Speculators (sic) do not control the prices. Futures contracts are bought and sold for a price that the purchaser feels the market will bear. Users of the commodities buy those contracts for a future date in order to know a certain price for that commodity. For example, an airline may pay slightly higher than the current price for gas two months from now because they think the price is going up, and they want to know for sure what they will pay. So, they can set the price of a plane ticket for that date knowing what their actual cost will be. This is done with all sorts of products.

The 'speculators' do not set the price of the contracts. They buy and sell them at a price that they believe that the market will bear at a future date. If they feel that the market for a commodity is going to go down in a month's time, they will not buy contracts for higher, but they would buy it for lower. This has been the case plenty of times in the past with oil. The futures markets for oil are not being affected by the speculators that have been so demonized. The markets have been affected by market forces such as higher demand, limited supply, declining U.S. currency, and many others.

Bottom line is that if the market did not support higher oil prices, speculators would not be purchasing contracts for higher prices. If they did, and the oil was not, in fact, priced that highly, they would be stuck with overpriced contracts that would be no use and the cost would be a loss.

Speculators do not cause the price of oil to go up. The oil market causes the future price of oil to continue to be higher.
 

Wesb737fo

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That's exactly my point. How do you think most Netjets customers traveled the country before Netjets existed? That's right- on the airlines, probably sitting in first class. You lost your bread and butter and they're never coming back. You can raise fares all you want but you'll only lose more trailer trash and continue to park airplanes. Didn't they teach you this at Riddle last year?

Trailer Trash huh? Wow. Such humility. I suppose it would be nice to be raised from such fine outstanding parents like yourself. You turned out really well. I bet your parents must be really proud of you.

Might I remind you, that given the choice of associating with the likes of yourself or the "trailer trash" that can't afford to fly on net-jets, I will choose the latter every time. Unless, of course, I am totally misreading your elitist attitude. Then you have my sincerest apologies.

Wes
 

Freight Dog

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You can't have something shoot up damn near vertically without it coming down damn near vertically... what goes up, must come down.

Take a look at the housing market - California, Nevada, Arizona... the market is TANKING. Why? Because of a huge spike in home prices fueled by irrational lending practices. Now that it's come to a head with those irrational lending practices and people can no longer afford those shady ARM's, you have record defaults and foreclosures and now the price is in damn near free-fall.

Same thing with oil speculation... how can this nation survive on such a vertical spike in prices? It's simply not sustainable. When the oil prices literally tank this economy, and it looks like we're well on our way, and people really curtail spending like they've started to, you'll see the oil bubble burst... look out below!

The speculators are enjoying this rapid rise just how the real estate speculators enjoyed the rapid rise in home prices from 2002 to 2005.
 

Captain Morgan

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Hey moron, most of those pax at Netjets used to be YOUR everyday 121 pax. In fact, they used to buy first class tickets. I wonder why they choose to pay more for Netjets?

Hey dipsh!t... no need for name calling. And these guys that are speculators are elitists probably like the guys flying Netjets. They think everything is hunky-dory so long as Jeeves delivers them their caviar on time. Guys like you are the reason I left corporate. Never had a nice thing to say about "other" pilots and they always had a chip on their shoulder, thinking they were the best. I left a 60k Falcon FO job at a good company because the guy I flew with most of the time was an a$$hole. I can just picture you and him holding hands as you two skip into the FBO. All of the other guys in the flight department were great and a blast to hang out with. Guess what,... They were all former 121 pilots. Go figure.
 
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Noserider76

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Users of the commodities buy those contracts for a future date in order to know a certain price for that commodity. For example, an airline may pay slightly higher than the current price for gas two months from now because they think the price is going up, and they want to know for sure what they will pay. So, they can set the price of a plane ticket for that date knowing what their actual cost will be. This is done with all sorts of products.

The problems occur when non-users of a product flood the market in a speculative bubble. Pension funds and traders who never plan to take delivery, drive the prices to frenzied levels for various reasons and end up harming the actual users of the product. Sure many of these speculators will take it in the shorts when the bubble bursts but the damage for many will have been done. There are some products that are too vital to be allowed to fluctuate, without controls, in today's markets. Take a look at what the ethanol idiocy has done to the price of food in many areas of the world.
 
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Quimby

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That's exactly my point. How do you think most Netjets customers traveled the country before Netjets existed?


On chartered Lears, etc......or their own a/c which they might have sold (like my previous employer) to go with a frax.

What do I win, Alex?
 
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