Sky West Interview Questions

Gutenberg

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I've heard they ask some tough questions on the interview. For example:


1. How do you know you need clearance to shoot an approach just by looking at the approach plate?

2. When do you use a 3:1 descent?

3. Can you fly IFR in class G? How about at night?

Thanks for any help.
 

Steveair

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Gutenberg said:
I've heard they ask some tough questions on the interview. For example:
1. How do you know you need clearance to shoot an approach just by looking at the approach plate?
2. When do you use a 3:1 descent?
3. Can you fly IFR in class G? How about at night?

Thanks for any help.

1. Don't you always need a clearance?? Perhaps radar vectors only for the approach.

2. Flying a visual approach with no GS (electronic nor visual). Hence, at 5 miles, you would want to be at 1500', 4 miles 1200', 3 miles 900' etc

3. Sure, sure. It's uncontrolled airspace.
 

wheelsup

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Maybe question #1 ties into question #3...you wouldn't need an approach clearence if the entire approach procedure was in uncontrolled airspace.

How you could tell if it was in uncontrolled airspace by looking at the plate I have no idea. Sure would like to know the answer to that one.

~wheelsup
 
R

RoyalAviation2

Maybe you should ask the interviewers, they frequently surf these boards.
 

Gutenberg

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I imagine the question about uncontrolled airspace would be governed by a specific operator's Ops Specs, some can get special authorizations from the admin. to fly in uncontrolled airspace (at least 135 operators can). I have no 121 experience however and am not sure.''

anyways, back to Point Break on spike tv.
 

CesnaCaptn

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wheelsup said:
Maybe question #1 ties into question #3...you wouldn't need an approach clearence if the entire approach procedure was in uncontrolled airspace.

How you could tell if it was in uncontrolled airspace by looking at the plate I have no idea. Sure would like to know the answer to that one.

~wheelsup

Approaches have to be in controlled airspace.
 

blesko

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perhaps question 1 implies when the phrase RADAR rREQUIRED is on the approach plate?? As far as approaches into controlled airspace, they may start in controlled airspace, but certainly below the Class E floor of 1200 or 700, its definately uncontrolled
 

wheelsup

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Just because you don't have an ATC RADAR pointing at you doesn't mean the airspace is uncontrolled. Out here in NM/CO/UT/AZ area we hear the phrase "radar contact lost" all the time, but we're still in controlled airspace, on an IFR flight plan.

"RADAR Required" is simply a component of the approach, such as ILS, DME, VOR, or whatever. It's required to shoot the approach.

~wheelsup
 

taters

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Q 2. 3:1 decent profiles are commonly used by regional airline dispatchers ...hence the Top of Decent Psuedo Waypoint that are generated by the FMC...........I have always seen 3:1 decent plans for Eagle and CHQ flight realeases when i worked ops.....this doesnt imply they were followed as I know a very senior Eagle captain on the ERJ that used to come screaming down from FL 270 @ 8-12 k per min...on ord-lnk..no $hit




" If the waitress' at Hooters had skirts any shorter, they would need hair nets."
 
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Bluto

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Even with full spoilers I find it hard to believe he could descend at 12,000fpm without overspeeding. Sounds like an urban legend. Any ERJ guys out there want to comment? In the CRJ if you do much more than 4k, you're bound to overspeed.
 

viper548

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Bluto said:
Even with full spoilers I find it hard to believe he could descend at 12,000fpm without overspeeding. Sounds like an urban legend. Any ERJ guys out there want to comment? In the CRJ if you do much more than 4k, you're bound to overspeed.

You can get to about 5500 in the CRJ if you're really light, but even then you're probably going to overspeed if you keep that rate for too long. IF someone got an ERJ to 12,000, the decent probably started at 250kts and ended up at 330kts.
 

propjob27

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Gutenberg said:
I've heard they ask some tough questions on the interview. For example:


1. How do you know you need clearance to shoot an approach just by looking at the approach plate?

2. When do you use a 3:1 descent?

3. Can you fly IFR in class G? How about at night?

Thanks for any help.

Man, it was a LONG time ago for me when I thought these were 'tough' questions.

Anyway, when I went to work there in 1999, they did ask technical questions.

On #3, the answer depends on where you are coming from. When I interviewed at SkyWest, I was coming from another 121 commuter airline. All 121 airlines prohibit IFR operations in Class G airspace, except for the approach phase. So the answer to #3 was, "it depends on your op. specs, but for us, no". That question is referring to the en-route phase. They will pull out an L-chart and say, can you go direct from this VOR to this VOR at xxx altitude. And the path will pass through "grey" shading, indicating class G airspace. And the answer is "no", you can't fly enroute through Class G airspace.

The approach phase is different. Of course you can start an apporach in Class E airspace at some shi t hole airport that reverts to Class G below 700 or 1200 AGL or whatever. But you definately can NOT fly through class G crusing along at 12000' in the en-route phase.
 
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