Reporting Leaving an altitude

beytzim

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Just curious if the average airline guy makes a report to Center when leaving one altitude for another after he's given a PD or crossing restriction.

i.e.:
Center: Flight xxx cross GEELA at 11/250
Flight XXX: Cross Geela at 11/250
....when leaving altitude:
Flight XXX: Center, Flight XXX leaving FL230....

The check airman at WN point to an AIM sentence that says it's a required call. I've never done it before and quite frankly never heard anyone else do it until I started here at WN, so who's right?
 

say again

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Some do, some don't. I probably do it about 60% of the time.
 

Booker

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Here we go again! :) Personally, I report it, because my FOM says I have to.
 

hockeypilot44

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I do unless the frequency is really busy. Most controllers really do not care either way.
 

skyaddict

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On the East coast I only do it if the frequency is quiet, for PD descents. I do try and get it in for normal descents unless the frequency is especially ("noone talk until I call you") busy.
 

stupidpilot

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Ya, the AIM says to do it, but I only do it when the freq isn't too busy. I'm sure the controllers can read their scope. I tend to do it every time when it's pilot discretion. Then the controller gets a heads up.
 

Hamburger

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The check airman at WN point to an AIM sentence that says it's a required call. I've never done it before and quite frankly never heard anyone else do it until I started here at WN, so who's right?
You might want to re-read your question. You've already answered yourself and even provided the reference.
 

Ty Webb

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Wow, another thread, peppered with pithy comments from self-righteous, anal-retentive turd-polishers . . what a surprise.

This is clearly an archaic hold-over from non-radar days that needs to be changed. Controllers are not shy about making their annoyance known when this call is made.

Yes, it's in the AIM. So is "words twice" "Mayday" and "Pan Pan". Use sparingly.

TW
 

Hair-on-Fire

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The check airman at WN point to an AIM sentence that says it's a required call. I've never done it before and quite frankly never heard anyone else do it until I started here at WN, so who's right?
Point to the line about not taxiing faster than a brisk walk and ask them about that.
 

Bavarian Chef

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I only call "vacating" after I call "traffic in sight" or most times "tally" just to pi$$ off the civvie pilots and always or at least 63% of the time I finish every call with "over".
 

PCL_128

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Dumb Pilot

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This requirement comes from another era, when the controllers had a "strip" board in front of them rather than a radar scope and this particular call would prompt him to move your strip from one altitude column on his strip board to the next before he hand you over. It is just one more of the regulations or requirements that have no practical purpose in today's aviation network (thus controllers not caring much if you make such call or not) but because of the slow and painful process that is change in any government agency (the FAA included) these relics continue to be in the books as active requirements and regulations. I'll give you another example, If you are navigating in a fancy modern A/C at 5, 000 feet in a beautiful clear day from Miami to West Palm on an IFR flight plan, witch way do you think the FAA regulations want you to navigate, using your fancy GNSS, IRS, GPS or looking down at the terrain features? Again, a requirement that comes from another era and that no FAA examiner in the cockpit doing a route check will actually enforce.
 

Daytonaflyer

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It's pretty much the same thing as reporting the FAF on every approach, entering a hold, leaving a hold; you're supposed to do it, but most don't. I wouldn't worry about it.
 

Hamburger

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I'll never understand why people ask questions they already know the answer to.

If that makes me self-righteous and anal retentive in your book, so be it.
 

Bigoober

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The greatest skill that a pilot can acquire is headwork. Yes it is a required call, but headwork would dictate whether it should be made. Try making that call to New York during its rush hour.

You can apply this to almost all requirements. Use your head.
 
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