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Psa ta

superatr

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taken from another forum...

Summary of Tentative Agreements

The following is a summary of the changes made to the current collective bargaining agreement (“Agreement”) by two tentative agreements reached between PSA and ALPA and one tentative agreement between US Airways Group (“Group”) and ALPA. This summary does not necessarily enumerate every change to the Agreement. Provisions of the Agreement that were not changed are not included, unless necessary to provide the context for a change. It is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, a substitute for or interpretation of the actual contractual language.

1. Group Letter of Commitment of Large Regional Jets to PSA
• Group commits to placing no less than thirty 71-90 seat jet aircraft at PSA.
• Pilots on the PSA seniority list shall operate the aircraft.
• Commitment is in effect for the duration of the CBA.
• Commitment is binding on any successor (including Group/AMR merger).
• The dispute resolution process in PSA/ALPA contract is binding on Group.
• The Group Commitment Letter is contingent on pilot ratification of the Large Regional Jet Order Letter of Agreement (LOA #4) described below.

2. Enhanced Career Opportunities Letter of Agreement (LOA #3)
• This LOA modifies the “Career Opportunities Letter of Agreement” (LOA #1) in the current Agreement.
• Pilots hired by US Airways pursuant to LOA #3 will be placed on personal leave with PSA until they complete or fail training. If a pilot fails, he can return to his most recent position at PSA and retain his status, domicile, longevity and seniority. If a pilot is terminated after completing training, he does not retain any rights to return to PSA.
• If a pilot meets the eligibility requirements, he will be offered an interview (previously, the pilot would be “considered” for an interview).
• Interviews will be granted in seniority order.
• Previously, one requirement was that a pilot not be “the subject of active discipline.” This term was clarified to mean he is not currently suspended.
• Exempts newly upgraded PSA captains from the requirement that they be in their current position for 12 months.
• If a pilot is not offered a position, he will be given the reasons why an offer was not made.
• If a pilot interviewed but was not offered a position prior to the effective date of LOA #3, he will be granted two additional opportunities after the effective date.
• Job offers at US Airways will be made in seniority order.
• Commitment of job offers is the lesser of 25% of positions offered in a calendar year or four positions for each month US Airways hires pilots.
• Job offer commitment extends for the life of the Agreement (2023). Previously, the commitment was for 3 pilots hired per month in 2013, 2014, and 2015, then 2 positions in 2016 and 2017.
• PSA may delay a pilot’s start of training at US Airways for PSA staffing reasons, but US Airways must still comply with the job offer commitments by the end of each calendar year.
• If a pilot declines an offer, he will not be considered for a position again until he notifies PSA and US Airways that he wishes to be considered.
• The terms of LOA #3 are binding on a successor, including the merged US Airways and American.
• After the merger, the parties will meet to discuss increasing the minimum number of jobs offered to PSA pilots, taking into account the size of PSA’s pilot force relative to the other wholly owned carriers.
• No furlough. Pilots on the seniority list as of the date of ratification of LOA #3 will not be furloughed except in case of conditions beyond PSA’s and US Airways’ control.
• LOA #3 is contingent on the ratification of LOA #4.
• LOA #3 is effective January 1, 2014 and is in effect for the duration of the CBA.
• LOA #3 is null and void if no 71-90 seat aircraft are delivered by December 31, 2015 or if the merger of US Airways Group and AMR does not occur by December 31, 2015.

3. Large Regional Jet Order Letter of Agreement (LOA #4)
• Current pay rates (longevity and annual increases) in Section 3.A.1 of the Agreement remain the same through March 31, 2018.
• Pay rates are extended until March 31, 2023 with 1% yearly increases.
• All pilots will still receive pay rate increases caused by adjustments to the blended rate resulting from the addition of large jets to the fleet.
• All pilots will still receive pay rate increases of 0.03% for each large jet added to the fleet in excess of the current 49 aircraft (this calculation is done prior to calculating the blended pay rate).
• The following pay caps and pay freezes will apply to all pilots and will occur upon the delivery of the first 71-90 seat jet aircraft (anticipated to be July 2014):
o Captain longevity pay is capped at 12 years of service or the pilot’s actual years of service, whichever is greater.
o First Officer longevity pay is capped at 4 years of service or the pilot’s actual years of service, whichever is greater.
• Pilots who decline a job offer or fail training at US Airways and return to PSA will cease to receive longevity pay rate increases and April 1 annual increases at the time they decline the offer or fail training.
• Pilots who fail to fill out the required paperwork to apply for a position at US Airways prior to December 1, 2013 or within 10 months of their date of hire will be considered to have declined a job offer. Such pilots will cease to receive longevity pay rate increases and April 1 annual increases at the time their seniority would otherwise grant them an interview at Airways.
• Pilots who do not meet the eligibility requirements for a US Airways interview described in LOA #3 are not subject to the freezes to longevity and April 1 annual increases described in the two bullet points immediately above.
• Pilots who are not offered a job at US Airways after their first interview will continue to receive April 1 annual increases, but their longevity increases will be capped at the greater of their current longevity step or at 12 years (for Captains) and 4 years (for First Officers).
• Pilots who are not offered a position at US Airways after a Repeat Opportunity as described in LOA #3 following his second interview will cease to receive longevity pay rate increases and April 1 annual increases.
• Pilots at the top of the PSA pay rate scale (18 years and above) may decline a job offer at US Airways and continue to receive 1% annual increases on April 1.
• Longevity caps and freezes apply to pay rates only, not to other accruals based on longevity such as vacation, sick leave, retirement, etc.
• Current per diem ($1.65 per hour as of 4/1/2013; $1.70 as of 10/1/2014; $1.75 as of 4/1/2016 and $1.80 as of 10/1/2017) modified to eliminate the 10/1/2017 increase to $1.80.
• Current medical insurance premium cost sharing percentage of 27% for the life of the Agreement changed to 29% on 1/1/14; 31% on 1/1/15; 33% on 1/1/16; and 35% on 1/1/17.
• Duration of the Agreement extended from 5 to 10 years.
• LOA #4 is null and void if no 71-90 seat aircraft are delivered by December 31, 2015 or if the merger of US Airways Group and AMR does not occur by December 31, 2015.
 

rockit85

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I guess it just takes 30 LARGE RJs to lower the bar again. What a terrible deal. The only cap I want to see is in ALPAs A$$. What a worthless union.
 

WSurf

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I almost wonder if Group sent that out with a straight face?? What an insult!! Looks like instead of a flowthru its more of a flushthru....





Pilots who fail to fill out the required paperwork to apply for a position at US Airways prior to December 1, 2013 or within 10 months of their date of hire will be considered to have declined a job offer. Such pilots will cease to receive longevity pay rate increases and April 1 annual increases at the time their seniority would otherwise grant them an interview at Airways.

Is this a joke? Required Paperwork???Blahahahahahahah If you want to force Senior Pilots to go to Mainline maybe pay them longevity at PSA at mainline.
 
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Oakum_Boy

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An airplane commitment. Yes ladies and gents, we are committed to letting you fly these shiny 71-90 (gasp!) seat planes on this POS agreement.

Congrats PSA and ALPA. Vote yes!
 

superatr

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I don't see where there is a guarantee that these are incremental aircraft. It seems to me that the company could park 30 older aircraft and no one would get upgraded.
 

Mickey Mouse

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It looks like PSA has a pilot group that knows how to "throw down". How refreshing.
 

WSurf

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The crazy deal is PSA Pilots take all the risk with this TA and Group gets cheaper labor more money in there already profitable pockets with no risk. I think this mainline hiring crap has probably came about because many of the Pilots at PSA and PDT haven't applied. More and more FO's are getting interviews and getting hired at about the same rate as our junior captains and Group somehow is wondering why we aren't applying??? Really??? So now they are going to force you too! :)
Why are many not applying??? Because at the current payrates going to US Airways would suck. Many Captains are making good money, living in base and have 3-4 vacations slots! Why give that up and go to an airline that won't get you off food stamps until 4th year pay? If I'm applying its to Delta or United that have a much better 2nd year pay.
Don't get me wrong if Airways and American merge it might be a better job. But with a family to feed and bills to pay many Captains can't afford to lose over half there pay and need about 8-9 years to recover the money lost.
Now why doesn't Airways just allow current payrates to be carried over to Airways. I think back in the day Conex had a flowthru that allowed you to take half your seniority to Continental for pay purposes. 8 year guy at Conex got 4th year pay at mainline. Conex was a WO'ed company at the time also.
This deal sucks a$$. I'm just surprised the PSA Leadership is even going to put this thing out for a vote. I would've fought harder for a much better deal going to a not so much better mainline.

And the real funny part is you can get turned down from mainline then get a pay freeze..... and then you turn right around and continue to fly there passengers with there planes. Figure that one out:)
 
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PropPiedmont

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Maybe that's the secret plan to pay freeze the pilot group. It'd be funny if no one got hired at US Airways/AA.
 

buxflyr

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This will be sold to the pilot group as job security. The leases on the 200's are up in the next 6 years. This is the replacement plan. If they vote no, there will be threats of PSA shutting down.

Boeing just put out an article forecasting half a million pilots needed in the next two decades. US Airways is not the only fish in the sea.

PSA has a strong pilot group. They did vote down the last 900 deal that kept pay rates the same.

It's a matter of not being influenced by scare tactics. Just my opinion.
 

www.

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APA is calling ALPA saying the deal violates APA scope clause.
 

WSurf

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Eagle Email:

Fellow American Eagle pilots,
[FONT=&quot]This is another disappointing week. We have now read the tentative agreement that PSA has reached with their management and with US Airways management and it is ugly. Here are a few lowlights. First and most significantly, it limits their Captain pay scales to year twelve and limits their First Officer pay scales to year four. In addition, this TA will extend their existing contract for an additional five years, until 2023 with no interim contract amendments. It limits their per diem to $1.75 for the duration of the agreement and the only pay raises PSA pilots will see for a decade will be the annual cost of living calculation that is already in their contract. By year three, the deal also raises their pilot medical benefit contribution from 27% to 35% of the annual cost with no language on deductibles and co-pays.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]In exchange for these concessions, the PSA pilots might receive 30 of American Airlines’ future CRJ-900 aircraft (assuming the AA/US Airways merger occurs). Amazingly, it appears that the company is only contractually required to place one of these aircraft into service at PSA by 2016 in order to fulfill its obligation and to make this new agreement binding on the pilot group. On the other hand, if ratified, pilot concessions begin this January. These 30 aircraft are for American feed and are part of the same aircraft order over which we were negotiating with US Airways.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]The PSA pilots will also receive an “enhancement” to their current guaranteed interview at US Airways. Interviews will be offered to PSA pilots in PSA seniority order but US Airways is under no obligation to offer employment to any particular PSA pilot. A pilot who does not receive an offer of employment from US Airways can interview again but if he is declined again, his longevity at PSA is immediately frozen for the remainder of his career. The “enhancement” to the guaranteed interview provision is that US Airways must hire four per month, rather than three PSA pilots. It also appears however, there are multiple scenarios where US Airways can determine they have met that obligation without actually hiring anyone.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]This tentative agreement represents the direction the American Eagle MEC was unwilling to go. As you know, your MEC has been committed to finding an agreement that does not gut the regional industry only to further the careers of senior Eagle pilots at the expense of everyone that will follow us. The MEC could not have been clearer on this position when it elected to end negotiations with US Airways and pushed for all of the ALPA-represented regional carriers to sign the “No B-Scale” letter. Although, this PSA deal does not contain a “B Scale” it is a massive step backwards for existing and future regional pilots.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]If ratified, this new paradigm will be used against our brothers and sisters at ASA/ExpressJet, Republic, and SkyWest, all of whom are currently in challenging negotiations, not to mention it being used against us when management returns for additional discussions on future aircraft. Along with the Pinnacle (Endeavor Air) bankruptcy contract, the new PSA agreement will become management’s new “target”.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]There are additional distasteful elements to this TA, not the least of which is the fact that this negotiation is over future AA feed at the exact time that the Department of Justice is opposing the merger of AA and US Airways. AA made it overwhelmingly clear that “large” RJs were an essential component of their restructuring plan, whether merged or stand alone. Now, AA’s future feed has been promised to a pilot group who will have to wait an indeterminate period of time to see if the merger will ever be approved, which is a precursor to AA’s regional aircraft being placed at PSA. During that delay, these essential aircraft will be withheld from AA’s feed operation, where it is already significantly behind its competition in “large” RJ deployment. This further confirms our position that AA needs to order large regional aircraft now and place them at American Eagle, the only constant irrespective of the mainline merger.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Additionally, by removing all Captain pay scales above step twelve, PSA’s tentative agreement eviscerates all the gains made over the last twelve years focused on making regional airlines a viable career choice for experienced pilots.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Both American and US Airways’ managements clearly know that withholding replacement aircraft from American Eagle works in opposition to cost savings elements that management committed to, making it more challenging for Eagle to compete.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Lastly, we are stunned by the lack of resistance exhibited from ALPA’s national officers, with the sole exception of Vice President of Administration and Eagle Captain Bill Couette. Our National Leadership has not led the way in this effort to “Stop the Whipsaw”.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]With months to go until new flight time and duty time regulations that will result in a five-to-ten percent increase in pilot staffing to cover existing schedules, and despite months of regional airlines missing hiring targets industry-wide, it is absurd that our national leadership has not supported the outcry from regional MECs to collectively set a higher bar and simply say, “no” to this last ditch effort by US Airways’ management to drive this industry into compensation models from twenty years ago when we were piloting Metroliners, rather than aircraft significantly larger and more complex that what used to be entry-level aircraft at mainlines.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]We all know that airlines need to compete based on costs. Eagle, as well as other MECs, have proven time and time again a willingness to work with management in a mutually agreeable way to rein in costs and find better and cheaper ways to do business. But it is one thing to decide to place aircraft at an airline because they are cheaper, it is another for an already inexpensive pilot group to voluntarily accept decade-long concessions to facilitate it. We hope the PSA pilots will realize that the race to the bottom simply is not worth the carrot and that ALPA’s national officers will ultimately agree that regional pilot jobs are worth protecting with the same vigor as mainline jobs. There will be another meeting next week with all the MEC Chairmen and I am confident your new MEC Chairman will carry this message.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]I cannot describe how disconcerting it is that this is the last hotline I will likely send to you. Nonetheless, I would be remiss if I closed without stating that I am proud of the Eagle MEC. Along with tremendous pilot support, we have weathered the proposed divestiture of American Eagle, the AMR bankruptcy, and a vicious negotiation with another company’s management, which as of now, has resulted in a bleak future for American Eagle employees. Despite record profits and a healthy parent company, ready to exit bankruptcy except for the current DOJ dispute, the $43 million that the American Eagle pilots conceded under a mutually agreeable negotiation is apparently not enough to satisfy management’s need to achieve “cheaper” labor before it can feel that it has wrestled enough from the expert workers who actually perform the job being purchased by our customers.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]It has been a great honor to serve you in this capacity and I look forward to continuing this battle alongside you on the flight deck.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Fraternally,[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Captain ..... ....[/FONT]
 

WSurf

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If Pilots vote it "in" call sign will be changed from "BlueStreak" to "BrownStreak" :) Enter sarcasm...
 
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Kaman

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Don't be shocked that this POS TA passes in spite of all the crew room, internet and other rhetoric to the contrary...Seen it before.
 

CX880

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Larger RJs and more or less a promised job. They'll take it. Not wise to mess with your wholly owning major. Look at comair
 

hou757

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Pas guys.. This is pathetic. You should recall your leaders for even agreeing to this TA.
 
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