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Middle East carriers order $150B in 777X's emirates cancels A350 order

SWA Bubba

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Yes, but when you are flying a transcon, it is nice when the autopilot does not actually move a huge yoke repeatedly, almost slamming you in the ball$, for 5 hours. Crew meals are more enjoyable when this thing is not in your way and you have a table. Guess it doesn't matter to SWA....they don't have crew meals anyway (sorry WN guys, couldn't resist).

PS, there ARE indications of a cross input, a red light with an arrow and a charming audible warning in a british accent of: "Priority left or Priority right" will sound very loudly through the speakers.

Really?

Exactly how big are your balls, that you have to worry about them being "slammed by the yoke" during 5 hours of cruise at altitude? Or maybe it's your huge gut you're thinking of, from all those delicious crew meals you've named yourself after, not to mention all of General Lee's ice cream sundaes. :)

Are you sure you've ever flown in a 737? The yoke's movement at cruise is essentially imperceptible, unless you stare at it and catch it moving a millimeter or so.

Not to add to the Boeing vs Airbus mudslinging contest, but my take is that they just have different philosophies on how to do things. To each his or her own.

Bubba
 

waveflyer

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:D Did you really just ask a dude about the size of his balls?

I believe he did:) haha

To be called "curious bubba" from now on...

You don't have to actually hit your balls to know what he's talking about- that said it's more than possible in a tall guy lean

Yokes are done-

Boeing says it's design philosophy is have the 777 look, operate and feel like other boeing's they may have flown...

It's ridiculous that a completely fly by wire jet still has a yoke.

And ridiculous that a 2017 737 max will still have cables
 

Dan Roman

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Really?

Exactly how big are your balls, that you have to worry about them being "slammed by the yoke" during 5 hours of cruise at altitude? Or maybe it's your huge gut you're thinking of, from all those delicious crew meals you've named yourself after, not to mention all of General Lee's ice cream sundaes. :)

Are you sure you've ever flown in a 737? The yoke's movement at cruise is essentially imperceptible, unless you stare at it and catch it moving a millimeter or so.

Not to add to the Boeing vs Airbus mudslinging contest, but my take is that they just have different philosophies on how to do things. To each his or her own.

Bubba

This has nothing to do with ones male attachments but once someone flies an Airbus they usually never want to deal with a yoke again. The side stick set up is so superior for comfort it's ridiculous. It's also fun to fly with a side stick.
 

waveflyer

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The gay innuendos just won't stop in this thread....
 

uba757

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I like the yoke on the 777! My average size balls never get smacked during flight!!!!!
 

whymeworry?

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Wonder what they will want in "return."

My guess: a US CBP pre-clear facility at DXB, guaranteed access to US markets (they have that anyway, but something in writing that allows them to do what they want unimpeded), US taxpayer-funded enhanced financing, other back-room agreements that Boeing no doubt got cleared though the lobby process in DC.
 

DUBLINFLYER

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British European Airways Flight 548 was a scheduled passenger flight from London Heathrow to Brussels on 18 June 1972 which crashed soon after take-off, killing all 118 people on board. The accident became known as the Staines disaster and remained the deadliest air disaster in Britain until the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988.
The Hawker Siddeley Trident suffered a deep stall in the third minute of the flight and crashed near the town of Staines, narrowly missing a busy main road. The ensuing inquest principally blamed the captain for failing to maintain airspeed and configure the high-lift devices correctly. It cited the captain's heart condition and the limited experience of the co-pilot, while also noting an unspecified "technical problem" that they apparently resolved while still on the runway.
The crash took place against the background of a pilots' strike that had caused bad feelings between crew members. The strike had also disrupted services, causing Flight 548 to be loaded with the maximum weight allowable.
Recommendations from the inquiry led to the mandatory installation of cockpit voice recorders in British-registered airliners. Another recommendation was for greater caution before allowing off-duty crew members to occupy flight deck seats.
Two of the pilots' unions protested at the conduct of the inquiry, which was likened to a 'lawyers' picnic'.
 

Dan Roman

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British European Airways Flight 548 was a scheduled passenger flight from London Heathrow to Brussels on 18 June 1972 which crashed soon after take-off, killing all 118 people on board. The accident became known as the Staines disaster and remained the deadliest air disaster in Britain until the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland, in 1988.
The Hawker Siddeley Trident suffered a deep stall in the third minute of the flight and crashed near the town of Staines, narrowly missing a busy main road. The ensuing inquest principally blamed the captain for failing to maintain airspeed and configure the high-lift devices correctly. It cited the captain's heart condition and the limited experience of the co-pilot, while also noting an unspecified "technical problem" that they apparently resolved while still on the runway.
The crash took place against the background of a pilots' strike that had caused bad feelings between crew members. The strike had also disrupted services, causing Flight 548 to be loaded with the maximum weight allowable.
Recommendations from the inquiry led to the mandatory installation of cockpit voice recorders in British-registered airliners. Another recommendation was for greater caution before allowing off-duty crew members to occupy flight deck seats.
Two of the pilots' unions protested at the conduct of the inquiry, which was likened to a 'lawyers' picnic'.

Dublin, sorry as I have had a couple Guinness's but....it seems you have posted this with an anti-union perspective when in reality it's a simple case of very weak CRM?
 

johnsonrod

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Norwegian is planning to fly 737-800 MAX transatlantic on thinner routes between Europe and the US. I know Privatair has been flying 737s for years across the Atlantic. That 737 can't be too comfy up front after 5-6 hours. I know I have a 2 hour a$$ in my narrow ERJ. LOL!
 
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boxjockey

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I don't think I've ever seen the 777 move the yoke more than 2 units at any point, much less in the cruise. Hater's gonna hate!!!

box
 

krewmeel

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Really?

Exactly how big are your balls, that you have to worry about them being "slammed by the yoke" during 5 hours of cruise at altitude? Or maybe it's your huge gut you're thinking of, from all those delicious crew meals you've named yourself after, not to mention all of General Lee's ice cream sundaes. :)

Are you sure you've ever flown in a 737? The yoke's movement at cruise is essentially imperceptible, unless you stare at it and catch it moving a millimeter or so.

Not to add to the Boeing vs Airbus mudslinging contest, but my take is that they just have different philosophies on how to do things. To each his or her own.


Bubba

Yes, I have flown the 737 and my BMI is 23 (not great, but not obese). My point is the "nexgen" 737 sucks on long legs. The cockpit is small, loud and crude compared to a A320. I guess I'm not a real pilot because I'm comfort oriented at this stage in my career (over 40). I think having to set the field elevation at the destination airport manually in a "NEW" aircraft is dumb. The "max" will have a "digital representation of the trailing edge flap position"... be still my heart. This is what the A320 series had when it came out....in 1988! I will say that if I accidentally penetrated a Tstorm, I would rather do it in a 737. It's crude, but it's a tank!
 
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