how many failed checkrides is too many

getonit

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I am applying at a regional and one of the questions is have you failed a checkride and how many. Unfortunately I have failed 5, CFI, CFII, initial 135 SIC in a metro, and the ugly, ugly one captain upgrade in a metro. The captain upgrade I was a complete mess and firetrucked the oral twice, no one's fault but my own and I knew the material just didn't demonstrate it at all. Don't get the idea I am a bad pilot, just a bad test taker, every captain I have flown with is writing honest recommendation letters.
Thanks.
 

JediNein

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Interviewer: "Have you failed a checkride and how many?"
You: "Unfortunately I have failed 5, CFI, CFII, initial 135 SIC in a metro, and the ugly, ugly one captain upgrade in a metro. The captain upgrade I was a complete mess and firetrucked the oral twice, no one's fault but my own and I knew the material just didn't demonstrate it at all.
<insert what you learned and how well you are taking checkrides now, and how you have overcome test nerves>

Fly SAFE!
Jedi Nein
 

chperplt

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The sad fact is, if you want to be in this business, you better learn to be a better test taker. With a checkride every 6 or 12 months, they come often.
 

bobbysamd

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Test taking

I agree 100% with the above. However, you are flying Metros right now which used to be typical commuter equipment. So, you have experience in equipment that is similar to what the regional in question is flying. In fact, many people would opine that Metros pose a far greater challenge than many of the props now in use. You have solved the checkitis problem. You are passing your currency checks now. The company at which you're flying took a chance on you, despite your previous busts. You are proving that they made a good decision in hiring you, finally, by getting the job done.

Maybe you can add something like that to Jedi's answer.
 
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captjim

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You never know until you try. Let them make the decission. Good luck!
 

LR25

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Well if they offered the interview, its yours to lose after that most of the time.

Being nervous is normal, just keep it in check and clear your mind.

Be positive.
 

Draginass

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It's not going to help. Busting 5 checkrides established a definate pattern. Busting the same oral twice will really send up red flags. As an interviewer, that'd make me wonder about that person's motivation and attitude. The majors want people that can learn quickly and not tie up the sims with redos and remedial. Keep in mind that in the hiring process you're competing against other people who haven't failed nearly as many, or probably any at all, and have sterling letters of recommendation and employment histories. The only way I know to mitigate the problem is to establish a long run of VERY successful evaluations and bury the busts in the background clutter.
 

flynearful

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I just want to know if you have a degree or not?
If so a 2yr or 4yr?

I am just wondering.....Thanks
 

AZaviator

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The only way I know to mitigate the problem is to establish a long run of VERY successful evaluations and bury the busts in the background clutter.
Great advice from Draginass. If you have to explain your checkride failures during your interview, be sure to also let your interviewer know what you've done since then, to improve yourself such as achieving several hundred hours of PIC turbine time in the Metro, mention the fact you've never had an incident or violation, etc. I would do all this, in addition to mentioning what you learned with each failure. As far as your CFI and CFII rides go, those probably won't carry as much weight as your 135 checkrides. Most people go through their ratings with one or two failures. I would focus more on the more recent checkrides.

I"m sure you aren't the only person out there with 5 checkride failures, so don't let it get you down or stop you from applying with the regionals, or wherever you want to fly.

Good luck! :cool:
 

TXflyer

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I failed my IR once, then washed out of B737 training because I went to law school and am now, at age 26, making 10 times as much as I would being a CFI or an F/E. Gotta love getting a check for $8,347 per month....AFTER taxes. I'm buying my own plane next month.
 

bobbysamd

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Degree and busts

You really need a four-year degree, in something. A two-year in aviation might suffice for the moment at the commuters, but most of those who've been to college will have four-year degrees.

Hope that helps.

You know, as far as the busts go, there may be mitigating circumstances, such as checkride, examiner and school politics. However, although you might truly have been a victim of the above, you can't say that at the interview. You're not in a court of law demanding justice. You cannot expect the interviewers to have mercy for your misfortunes. Life sucks, sometimes. You have to suck it up and put a happy face on it by explaining how you benefited from the experiences, which you have. You've reached back a little further, you've put the checkitis behind you, you have grown, and you will grow with them if they hire you.
 

Chunk

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TXflyer said:
I failed my IR once, then washed out of B737 training because I went to law school and am now, at age 26, making 10 times as much as I would being a CFI or an F/E. Gotta love getting a check for $8,347 per month....AFTER taxes. I'm buying my own plane next month.
What, exactly, was the point of this post?

Chunk<--rather be a CFI and starve than be an ambulance-chaser.
 

MetroSheriff

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TXflyer said:
I failed my IR once, then washed out of B737 training because I went to law school and am now, at age 26, making 10 times as much as I would being a CFI or an F/E. Gotta love getting a check for $8,347 per month....AFTER taxes. I'm buying my own plane next month.
Right, we got it the first time you posted your drivel on the other thread.

Thanks for the info.
 

DarnNearaJet

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Checkride failures? You'll be right at home in ACA's CRJ Training program.

Seriously, though. We've had plenty of CRJ drivers who have pinked at ACA wind up at the majors. Just blame no one but yourself and it shouldn't hinder you.
 

V-1

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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by TXflyer
I failed my IR once, then washed out of B737 training because I went to law school and am now, at age 26, making 10 times as much as I would being a CFI or an F/E. Gotta love getting a check for $8,347 per month....AFTER taxes. I'm buying my own plane next month.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Perhaps you should purchase a little maturity first.
 

FL000

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My guess is that he went to law school because he washed out of 737 training and is trying to justify his failed excursion into aviation. If he were truly satisfied, he wouldn't feel a need to give us his biography and balance sheet.

If you're in 737 training, aren't you pretty much past the starvation factor in aviation? If you love money AND flying (don't we all), why wouldn't you press on from there?
 

UPS Capt

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...Gotta love getting a check for $8,347 per month....AFTER taxes.
TXflyer,

Wow..I'd be taking a serious pay cut to make that kind of money! And, I bet I work less than half what you do at your law practice!

So, as others have said, what was the point of your post?!?:confused:
 

Timebuilder

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Draginass has articulated the one hope that you have: establish a new pattern of accomplishment and professionalism.

Simulate the tests before you take them. If you have to, take them so many times that they are boring. Have several different friends simulate the oral. Have them simulate the flight or sim portion on a FTD. Do what you have to do. This is your career.

If there is another rating you can train for, spend the money and DO IT. Max out on the written. Get a letter from the DE praising your ability. Do something.

Don't let it appear that you are stuck in this rut.

Good luck!
 
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flyhi

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TXflyer-

I don't get it...

"washed out of B737 training because I went to law school and am now, at age 26, making 10 times as much as I would being a CFI or an F/E".

Were you in law school at the same time as B737 training???? And, sorry, but there's a pretty large difference in pay between a CFI and F/E at a national and/or major.

Anyway.....WHO CARES!!!!
 

Fitzy

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TXflyer-

THANK-YOU for the much needed laugh. 26 years old, 8000 hrs and a Law degree. Also $8.347 a month . Is that rounded up or down to the nearest 10 cents?


"Throw me a fricken bone here"


Good luck -
Cousin Vinnie
 
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