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Blood Pressure

JonJohn82

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Greetings,

Does anyone know what the blood pressure tolerances are for a 1st class medical?

Thanks,
Jon
 

hotwings402

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155/95

However, if you get white coat, find a understanding doctor and take your blood pressure at home with a BP monitor that has a memory then just bring it in.
 

Jmajoris

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hotwings402 said:
155/95

However, if you get white coat, find a understanding doctor and take your blood pressure at home with a BP monitor that has a memory then just bring it in.
Doesn't white coat only affect the top number? And isn't the bottom number the more important of the 2???
 

bugchaser

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As far as I can remember, the tolerances are 155/90. If you are anywhere close to that, please don't put off going to your doctor and doing something about lowering it. There are many meds that you can take and not have any problem with the feds.
 

hotwings402

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I agree if your bp is close to 155/95 at home you got problems. You need to exercise, stop caffiene, stop eating junk, lose weight etc. Magnesium supplement with a 2/1 ratio of calcium is 1200 mg calcium to 600 mg magnesium is great for bp. If your bp is fairly normal at home but rises in the doctors office then great, do what I said above.
 

JonJohn82

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I imagine limiting my soda intake will help. Also, I intend to start exercising more regularly.
 

satpak77

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also

no more coffee

water water water, nothing else

bananas, melons, fish, chicken. 1 banana a day minimum

Raisin Bran and Oatmeal with low-fat milk

Knock off the eggs, you can eat them but eat 50% the number a week from now on

the only salt is whats already IN the food

exercise every other day, jog, walk, etc. SOMETHING

re-test in 60 days and see what happens. If still high, get medical advice
 
T

TDTURBO

HTN is defined by BP over 140/90 taken at least three different times.

The top number is the amount of pressure the heart puts out, the bottom number is the static pressure the heart needs to overcome to push blood. The difference between the two is pulse pressure. Up until last year, it was thought that the bottom number was the most important, that is no longer true. The above advice on lowering BP is good.
 

cj610

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Bp

Has anybody here had high BP and actually got it to come down without going on medication?

CJ610
 

VampyreGTX

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cj610 said:
Has anybody here had high BP and actually got it to come down without going on medication?

CJ610
I have and so has my brother-in-law, you can do it (my brother-in-law was dangerously high and he went to the doctor and got a prescription, but ended up getting it down without using the meds.)

I also recomend supplementing with CoQ10 and Celery Seed Extract (if you can afford them...). The Celery Seed extract is not something to use everyday as it will eventually not work. THe initial use will bring it down in a few days, so if you worried, use it for a few days leading up to going to the doctor. THe CoQ10 is more of a long-term effect and is a good supplement to use, though not the cheapest. I know Hawthorne Berry is also a good one to add to the mix.

In the end, you need to know why you BP is up, be it stress, lack of sleep or your diet, you will need to adjust that. Make sure your sodium intake is lowered and you get plenty of fluids. Also, increase your potassium intake by eating bananas.
 

coolyokeluke

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Thanks for all the advice fellas. Sunday I did a BP screening (not related to my medical) and was at 140/90. Over the last two years my BP has gone up but it wasn't too dramatic and I figured it was just the "white coat syndrome". Now I'm not making more excuses. I'm aggressively monitoring how much I eat, trying to eat healthier, and ensuring I exercise every day. Hopefully that will help. A friend of mine swears by green tea, I have a cup in the morning. I don't know how easy it's going to be once I get to the crash pad and on the road to keep up the healthy eating and exercise. Any advice on eating healthy/inexpensively at the crash pad and on the road?
 

VampyreGTX

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coolyokeluke said:
Thanks for all the advice fellas. Sunday I did a BP screening (not related to my medical) and was at 140/90. Over the last two years my BP has gone up but it wasn't too dramatic and I figured it was just the "white coat syndrome". Now I'm not making more excuses. I'm aggressively monitoring how much I eat, trying to eat healthier, and ensuring I exercise every day. Hopefully that will help. A friend of mine swears by green tea, I have a cup in the morning. I don't know how easy it's going to be once I get to the crash pad and on the road to keep up the healthy eating and exercise. Any advice on eating healthy/inexpensively at the crash pad and on the road?
Watch out with the greentea. That has caffeine and the flavonoids in it actually act as a thremogenic and can raise pressure slightly. My wife actually can't drink green tea as she gets jittery and her BP increases as if she's on stimulants if she has it. (For me, I get nothing like that from the tea.)
 

TR4A

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I just had my Class 1 on Tuesday. My BP was 114/88 using the standard BP thingy on wheels with a stethoscope. Just went to the dentist today, they are now checking BP, it was 121/80 using an automated device. When my AME checks my BP it is always all over the place. When it is checked with electronic device it is close to 120/80 which it has been for the last 30 years.
FAA Blood Pressure Standards

The FAA’s upper limit for blood pressure previously varied depending on a pilot’s age and class of certificate. The standards now allow certification for pressures up to 155/95 without an evaluation. Pilots with blood pressures above this level may still be certified after a cardiovascular evaluation (CVE). The standards set by the FAA should not be construed as healthy or "safe" levels. They are maximum levels. Blood pressure near these limits should be evaluated and treated as per the American Heart Association guidelines.
 

satpak77

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pushups, situps, jumping jacks at the crash pad. No its not the latest "Ballys Gym", but it has been tested by millions of soldiers, so it will probably work for you.

Also, if possible, walk for 1 hour at above-normal pace while at crash pad or try to find a park with a running trail nearby, or a swimming pool.

exercise or not, remember, no salt, high potassium, lots of water (water is now the only liquid allowed in your body), fiber, oatmeal, no more red meats, more fish.

re-test in 60 days and let us know

you don't need red-flags in your FAA Medical file, do the above and it will help, trust me
 
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