Babbit Selling out On the 1500 Min Hire Rule....

Sedona16

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What else is he going to cave on? I'ts concerning that his most recent comments mirror what the ATA has said the past few days. They got to him? Thoughts?

DATE:31/07/09
SOURCE:Air Transport Intelligence news
New safety legislation 'is not necessary': FAA's Babbitt
By Brendan Sobie


US FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt says a bill introduced by Congress earlier this week aimed at improving regional airline safety in the wake of February's Colgan Air Bombardier Dash 8 Q400 crash "is not necessary" because the agency has already taken sufficient steps to address the issues raised by the fatal crash.

If enacted, the Airline Safety and Pilot Training Improvement Act of 2009 would force the FAA and regional carriers to enhance training and hiring requirements and fatigue countermeasures. The bill was introduced in the House on 29 July but Babbitt believes by the time Congress returns from its summer recess in September and starts debating the bill the need for such legislation will be moot. He points out the FAA has been working with regional carriers the last couple of months on several safety enhancements.

"I think we may be well enough along [with these efforts] that by the time this bill works its way to the floor that we may be able to see some of the supporters of this and say: 'This was a great idea but we did it already and here's the final product. We don't need to do anything except to finish this,'" Babbitt told Flightglobal in an interview during AirVenture 2009 in Oshkosh.

"I think this is not necessary. Many of the things they are looking to address have already been addressed."

Babbitt points out that the FAA is already proposing new rules governing pilot training and rest. As part of the FAA's effort to improve regional airline safety in the wake of the Colgan crash, in June Babbitt also asked all regional carriers to provide by the close of business on 31 July a written commitment to adapt voluntary safety measures. Babbitt says it has already received "a good number" of replies from this request and to date all of them have been positive. He says more replies are expected to come in the last day before the deadline and he is confident most, if not all, carriers will respond although they are not required to do so.
"It's not a mandate. [To be a requirement] I'd have to propose a rule and that would take a fair amount of time," Babbitt explains. "We've asked what I thought was a reasonable request. We have also indicated that by the end of September I will make public who hasn't complied with the request."

Specifically Babbitt is asking airlines to participate in voluntary safety reporting schemes such as the Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA) and the Aviation Safety Action Programme (ASAP). "We have a call to action. All of the regional carriers I hope will be in compliance with our request to have FOQA and ASAP programmes," Babbitt says.
While most of the requirements included in the Airline Safety and Pilot Training Improvement Act of 2009 are already being addressed by the FAA as part of earlier actions, Babbitt acknowledges the bill's proposal to significantly increase the minimum hours of flight time required for first officers would be a totally new requirement. But Babbitt believes requiring airline co-pilots to have at least 1,500 hours is not necessary.
"In the pilot community I think it is acknowledged that simply raising the total amount of time by over half is not really a good benchmark for how good the quality of the pilot is," Babbitt says. "The quality of training is far more important than the quantity of training or total time."
Babbitt, who took over as FAA administrator two months ago and is a former head of the Airline Pilots Association (ALPA), says the agency will try to educate members of Congress to prove to them that quality of training is more important than quantity. Perfect segway for the ATA to later reign in the simulator based training programs with minimimal hours (even less than required now).

"I think we need to do some education in a few areas," he says. "Every now and again someone makes a misconception and says, 'oh my goodness this is a very bad situation.' In some of these we can say: 'Look this is a misconception. Here are the actual facts.' I think we'll actually do that with some of these cases."

Babbitt's comments follows suggestions by Air Transport Association of America (ATA) CEO James May that lawmakers should wait until interventions already launched by the FAA and others have an opportunity to generate results before legislating any changes.
 

Skywest Pylot

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There is now no question in my mind who controls the strings of this puppet. Babbitt IS a sellout! A 200 hour wonder has no business being in the right seat of a commercial airliner, PERIOD!
 

nwaredtail

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And this surprises you because?????????????????

Just wait until the," the current rest rules are fine, just look at how may crashes there have been due to fatigue, statistically, the rest rules are more than adequate."
 

Skywest Pylot

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I wonder what it ultimately cost ATA to buy Babbitt?
 
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scrub

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A 200 hour wonder has no business being in the right seat of a commercial airliner, PERIOD!


But he or she can fly a high performance jet or a large transport in the military to defend your freedoms? I am not ex or present military!
 

ImbracableCrunk

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As part of the FAA's effort to improve regional airline safety in the wake of the Colgan crash, in June Babbitt also asked all regional carriers to provide by the close of business on 31 July a written commitment to adapt voluntary safety measures. Babbitt says it has already received "a good number" of replies from this request and to date all of them have been positive. He says more replies are expected to come in the last day before the deadline and he is confident most, if not all, carriers will respond although they are not required to do so.
. . . Babbitt also reportedly asked the airlines pretty pretty please and promised to be their best friend forever. . .

I'm sure the airlines will comply . . . to the extent possible. :rolleyes:
 

FoxHunter

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There is now no question in my mind who controls the strings of this puppet. Babbitt IS a sellout! A 200 hour wonder has no business being in the right seat of a commercial airliner, PERIOD!
How much tie do you think the average new hire had at the majors when Randy started at EAL? Very common to hire guys that held a FAA C&I, ASEL. Two to five hundred hours was the norm. If a guy had 1000 hours and had not been hired by a major he had some sort of problem such as glasses, too old at age 33. It was not until 1974 that the FAA decided that airline F/Os should have a multi engine rating. Prior to that many F/Os were flying DC8s, 707s, 727s with ASEL only.
 

ALGFLYR

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A 200 hour wonder has no business being in the right seat of a commercial airliner, PERIOD!


But he or she can fly a high performance jet or a large transport in the military to defend your freedoms? I am not ex or present military!

The main difference here is that the Military pilots are chosen using more than their ability to pony up large sums of money to buy their job. And once a Military pilot is chosen to fly for our freedom, the training they recieve is far superior to attending Gulfstream academy...

I think that was a main point on new legislation, better training and recruiting...
 

Sedona16

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How much tie do you think the average new hire had at the majors when Randy started at EAL? Very common to hire guys that held a FAA C&I, ASEL. Two to five hundred hours was the norm. If a guy had 1000 hours and had not been hired by a major he had some sort of problem such as glasses, too old at age 33. It was not until 1974 that the FAA decided that airline F/Os should have a multi engine rating. Prior to that many F/Os were flying DC8s, 707s, 727s with ASEL only.
I really don’t see your point. The airmail guys used to navigate looking down going from farm house to farm house with a lot of fatalities. We make CHANGE to make things safer. There were more accidents with the guys you are talking about as well. This is not a guess it is statistically a fact.
 

tie1on

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babbit is an A$$ kissing piece of S*** he has caved on everythng. check his record. randy is in this for himself.
 

samballs

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He'll probably get a car if he caves, seems most (mec's) do when they side with mang
 

Raoul Duke

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there is no reason to go to 1500, it is much more important to focus on the quality of the training received at the regional level
 

regionaltard

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Not the first time Babbitt's been spotted on his knees under management's desk.
 

Draginass

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A 200 hour wonder has no business being in the right seat of a commercial airliner, PERIOD!


But he or she can fly a high performance jet or a large transport in the military to defend your freedoms? I am not ex or present military!
New military pilots receive much better training generally than civil pilots. Also, new military pilots are very closely supervised and mentored during their professional development in a close knit squadron environment.

New civil pilots are trainined/qualified, then thrown out into a very impersonal system where they are passed from crew to crew with little/no coherent consistent supervision.

With regards to the FAA, it looks as if our new administrator is following the lead of his long line of kneepad-wearers and is caving on real reform of this pathetic industry and is going to do another eyewash job.
 
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Mikes Apartment

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there is no reason to go to 1500, it is much more important to focus on the quality of the training received at the regional level
So going by that logic why do captains need 1500 hours? Why don't we drop that as well?

The point of making 1500 hours and an ATP the minimum is so everyone has more confidence that BOTH pilots know what the ******************** they're doing.
 

ualdriver

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For pete's sake guys, will ya just wait before you hang the guy? This legislation still has to work it ways through the halls of Congress, and undoubtedly there will be changes there as well. Then the FAA is going to be going down its own path concurrently. Let's see what they come up with, then we'll hang 'em :)
 

PCL_128

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Babbitt has been a sell-out for years. He sat on management's side of the bargaining table at Pinnacle during contract negotiations as a "consultant."

Still, even as a sell-out, it's better to have him there in that position rather than some lawyer or politician.
 

Candide

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A 200 hour wonder has no business being in the right seat of a commercial airliner, PERIOD!


But he or she can fly a high performance jet or a large transport in the military to defend your freedoms? I am not ex or present military!
Apples and oranges, my friend.

A 200 hour military pilot has just participated in a training program in which he was a hunted animal, not a valued customer. Also, he's probably still in flight training (FRS, etc.), and if not is very closely monitored by personal-attention squadron standardization and training program (extremely unprofitable--lucky the military isn't in the business of making money).
 
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