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Wow...how about this apparent lack of judgement

LJ45

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NTSB Identification: ERA09LA469
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 21, 2009 in Teterboro, NJ
Aircraft: RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT COMPANY 58, registration: N167TB
Injuries: 2 Serious.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.
HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 21, 2009, about 0305 eastern daylight time, a Raytheon Aircraft Company model 58, N167TB, operated by Quest Diagnostics Incorporated, was destroyed after collision with terrain and a post crash fire during an aborted landing at Teterboro Airport (TEB), Teterboro, New Jersey. The certificated airline transport pilot (captain) and the certificated commercial pilot (first officer) were seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cargo flight that originated at Pottstown Limerick Airport (PTW), Pottstown, Pennsylvania, at 0252, and destined for TEB. A company flight plan was filed for the flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that air traffic control (ATC) cleared the airplane for a visual approach to Runway 1, a grooved asphalt runway that was 7,000 feet long, and 150 feet wide. The runway was equipped with high-intensity runway edge lighting and Visual Approach Slope Indicator (VASI) guidance.

Preliminary radar data depicted the airplane as it approached from the west on an extended left base for runway 01, at 1,400 feet msl and 204 knots ground speed. The airplane maintained 204 knots and descended to 1,300 feet msl within one mile of the airport before it turned north towards the airport. The radar track overshot the runway centerline and at 600 feet msl and one half mile from the airport, the airplane's ground speed was 178 knots. The airplane crossed the runway threshold at 186 knots ground speed, and was depicted over the center of the airport at 100 feet msl and 160 knots. Witnesses stated the airplane flew the length of runway at low altitude before it overshot the departure end, departed airport property, struck a sign and a tree, and burst into flames.

ATC reported that all communications with the airplane were routine, that no emergency was declared by the crew, and that no communications were received from the accident airplane after it was cleared to land.

Due to their injuries, neither pilot was immediately available for interview.

PILOT INFORMATION

A review of FAA airman records revealed that the captain held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane multiengine land and a commercial pilot certificate with rating a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single engine, multiengine, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first class medical certificate was issued in January 2009, and he reported 15,000 total hours of flight experience at that time.

The first officer held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first class medical certificate was issued in November 2008, and he reported 1,350 total hours of flight experience at that time.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

According to FAA and maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1999, and its most recent annual inspection was completed May 27, 2009, at 3,131.7 total aircraft hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0330, the weather reported at Teterboro Airport included clear skies and winds from 170 degrees at 6 knots. The visibility was 10 miles. The temperature was 27 degrees Celsius (C) and the dew point was 23 degrees C.

WRECKAGE INFORMATION

Examination of the airplane by a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator on the day of the accident revealed the airplane was destroyed due to impact and post crash fire. The cockpit, cabin, and both wings were consumed by fire, and the tail section was separated by impact. Control cable continuity was established from the flight control surfaces, to their respective cable breaks, and ultimately to the cockpit area. All cable, pulley, and bellcrank failures were consistent with overload.

The left propeller was separated from its engine crankshaft but remained with the engine. The right propeller was still attached to its engine. Both engines remained in their nacelles but were damaged by impact and fire. The blades of both propellers appeared in a position consistent with the "feathered" position. The wreckage was recovered from the site for a detailed examination.

The wreckage was examined in Clayton, Delaware on August 25, 2009. Both propellers were disassembled, and there was no evidence of pre-impact anomalies noted. There were no internal witness marks to indicate propeller blade position at impact.

Examination of the landing gear actuator/motor revealed a position consistent with the down-and-locked position. The flap actuators were measured and the measurements were consistent with flaps in the "approach" position.
 

Fly91

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186 kts crossing the threshold with full flaps and gear down.....for a prop-driven aircraft.....what the hell. It would have to dive to make that speed. That would be an insane speed for any turbojet powered aircraft in the landing config, except maybe the SR-71 Blackbird.

Looks like IT MIGHT BE another case of a co-pilot practicing his approach/landings and the captain had no clue how to watch him and keep things under control. Captain was an instructor too. If not....and it was the captain flying...its time that captain hangs up his wings.

Pathetic..........
 

peter185

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For non-Baron people the gear and approach flap speed is 152 kts and full flaps is ~120 kts. They weren't even close to that!
 

LJ45

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I guess they didn't want their cargo looking at them funny if they did a go around. :rolleyes:
 

cjdriver

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I was wondering what the heck happened with this one. I thought it might have been an unstabalized approach, but I read where the pilot was a high time guy and figured that wasn't possible. How does this stuff happen?
 

semperfido

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. How does this stuff happen?

I know it was a rhetorical question. Complacency, Over- confidence, poor judgement, un-qualified, un- trained, u name it. You can be sure the reason on this one will surface rather quickly.
 

ksu_aviator

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I was wondering what the heck happened with this one. I thought it might have been an unstabalized approach, but I read where the pilot was a high time guy and figured that wasn't possible. How does this stuff happen?

High time does not equal good pilot. I've seen a couple of high time pilots that are not competent. And I'm not talking about lacking in a couple of minor areas...I'm talking about 'how did you ever pass a checkride' incompetent. It always seems to be the second career people.
 

greed

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Wow I did not realize that plane would go that fast even at full nose down, full throttle :)
 

Colonel Savage

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Unless there was some sort of incapacitation involved, it's a case of sheer incompetence. Not only did he screw up the approach, he totaly botched the go around to the point of losing control and crashing in VFR conditions. Wonder how he survived as long as he did.
 

cjdriver

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This had to be a fiasco in the cockpit. How do you go from 200kts short final while dirty, to crashing on a go around? He!!, they could have simply raised the gear and pulled up and they would have been in Newark airspace in about 5 seconds!
 

ultrarunner

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This had to be a fiasco in the cockpit. How do you go from 200kts short final while dirty, to crashing on a go around? He!!, they could have simply raised the gear and pulled up and they would have been in Newark airspace in about 5 seconds!


YEP, and still have had enough energy to make a 270 back to runway 6 or 24 with both of 'em shut down, since naturally had he not crashed in the building, he would have prly accidentally feather both when he pulled the wrong levers back...

be careful out there.
 

buzjob

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Either "the freight can't wait" or "hey Bubba, watch this".

That's my guess.
 

rumpletumbler

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First officer in a Baron?

All the ad's that I've seen for Quest Diagnostics have been 3000TT to apply but it appears the 'first officer' had just above 135 IFR mins.

Anyone here work for Quest? Is it possible to get on with 135 IFR mins? I've heard no, but can't find anyone who actually is employed there.
 

Fly91

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High time does not equal good pilot. I've seen a couple of high time pilots that are not competent.

Ain't that the truth. A charter company I worked for a LONG time ago had this "older" guy come in for a job. Had a true 18,000+ hours, types and PIC time on like 6 airliners, flew for Eastern, Tower and Southern Air. Typical charter company......he bought his own type-rating on the Learjet and the moron chief pilot/owner of the company went up for a quick flight with him, signed him off, and let him fly as captain with like 20 hours on the Lear.
He was coming back from his first flight ever with the company, first flight ever in the Lear as a Part 135 checked captain too, letting the co-pilot land who didn't have a type-rating and maybe 100 hours on the Lear as SIC.

They went right off the end because he was screaming it in on final and did nothing, and didn't go around. Lear 55 too, that certainly didn't help matters.
 

J.Otto

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The PIC died. Wife claims he wasnt at controls. R.I.P.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5j10WwBXvgmjz0dflGUVNNl3wmflQD9AH89R00

Pilot injured in Teterboro, NJ, crash dies
(AP) – 6 hours ago

LIVINGSTON, N.J. — The pilot of a small plane that burst into flames after crashing at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey last month has died from his injuries.

George Maddox of Sinking Spring, Pa., died Friday at Saint Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, said his wife, Lisa Roach Maddox. He and the co-pilot, Sanil Gopinath of Laurel, Md., suffered severe burns in the Aug. 21 crash, and Gopinath remains hospitalized.

Authorities have said the 54-year-old Maddox was piloting the twin-engine Beechcraft Baron, which crashed into a tree and sign after an aborted landing. However, his wife says he wasn't at the controls at the time of the crash.

The plane was carrying blood and urine specimens for Quest Diagnostics, a testing firm with an office near the Bergen County airport.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.
 

Fly91

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ultrarunner

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Maybe he was a checkairman or something? Anyone know?

Could be I suppose.

He must have been an active CFI, since he had kept that certificate valid.

Also, what was his PIC limitation on the Learjet? Not that it has anything to do with this crash. But usually, the limitation is stated, such as circle to land NA, or things like that.
 
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