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Well, today was the day

SpatialD

Fed up
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Oct 29, 2005
Posts
90
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My name is Michael Roberts, and I am a pilot for ExpressJet Airlines (that is, I still am for the time being). This morning as I attempted to pass through the security line for my commute to work I was denied access to the secured area of the terminal building at Memphis International Airport. I have passed through the same line roughly once per week for the past four and a half years without incident. Today, however, the TSA agents at this checkpoint were using one of the new Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) systems that are currently being deployed at airports across the nation (virtual strip searching). Travelers refusing this indignity may instead be physically frisked by a government security agent until the agent is satisfied to release them on their way in what is being touted as an “alternative option” to AIT. The following is a somewhat hastily drafted account of my experience this morning.

As I loaded my bags onto the X-ray scanner belt, an agent told me to remove my shoes and send them through as well, which I’ve not normally been required to do when passing through the standard metal detectors in uniform. When I questioned her, she said it was necessary to remove my shoes for the AIT scanner. I explained that I did not wish to participate in the AIT program, so she told me I could keep my shoes and directed me through the metal detector that had been roped off. She then called somewhat urgently to the agents on the other side: “We got an opt-out!” and also reported the “opt-out” into her handheld radio. On the other side I was stopped by another agent and informed that because I had “opted out” of AIT screening, I would have to go through secondary screening. I asked for clarification to be sure he was talking about frisking me, which he confirmed, and I declined. At this point he and another agent explained the TSA’s latest decree, saying I would not be permitted to pass without showing them my naked body, and how my refusal to do so had now given them cause to put their hands on me as I evidently posed a threat to air transportation security (this, of course, is my nutshell synopsis of the exchange). I asked whether they did in fact suspect I was concealing something after I had passed through the metal detector, or whether they believed that I had made any threats or given other indications of malicious designs to warrant treating me, a law-abiding fellow citizen, so rudely. None of that was relevant, I was told. They were just doing their job.

Eventually the airport police were summoned. Several officers showed up and we essentially repeated the conversation above. When it became clear that we had reached an impasse, one of the more sensible officers and I agreed that any further conversation would be pointless at this time. I then asked whether I was free to go. I was not. Another officer wanted to see my driver’s license. When I asked why, he said they needed information for their report on this “incident” – my name, address, phone number, etc. I recited my information for him, until he asked for my supervisor’s name and number at the airline. Why did he need that, I asked. For the report, he answered. I had already given him the primary phone number at my company’s headquarters. When I asked him what the Chief Pilot in Houston had to do with any of this, he either refused or was simply unable to provide a meaningful explanation. I chose not to divulge my supervisor’s name as I preferred to be the first to inform him of the situation myself. In any event, after a brief huddle with several other officers, my interrogator told me I was free to go.

As I approached the airport exit, however, I was stopped again by a man whom I believe to be the airport police chief, though I can’t say for sure. He said I still needed to speak with an investigator who was on his way over. I asked what sort of investigator. A TSA investigator, he said. As I was by this time looking eagerly forward to leaving the airport, I had little patience for the additional vexation. I’d been denied access to my workplace and had no other business keeping me there.

“Am I under arrest?” I asked.

“No, he just needs to ask you some more questions.”

“But I was told I’m free to go. So… am I being detained now, or what?”

“We just need to hold you here so he can…”

“Hold me in what capacity?” I insisted.

“Detain you while we…”

Okay, so now they were detaining me as I was leaving the airport facility.

We stood there awkwardly, waiting for the investigator while he kept an eye on me. Being chatty by nature, I asked his opinion of what new procedures might be implemented if someday someone were to smuggle an explosive device in his or her rectum or a similar orifice. Ever since would-be terrorist Richard Reid set his shoes on fire, travelers have been required to remove their footwear in the security line. And the TSA has repeatedly attempted to justify these latest measures by citing Northwest flight 253, on which Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab scorched his genitalia. Where, then, would the evolution of these policies lead next?

“Do you want them to board your plane?” he asked.

“No, but I understand there are other, better ways to keep them off. Besides, at this point I’m more concerned with the greater threat to our rights and liberties as a free society.”

“Yeah, I know,” he said. And then, to my amazement, he continued, “But somebody’s already taken those away.”

“Maybe they have,” I conceded, watching the throng of passengers waiting their turn to get virtually naked for the federal security guards.

As a side note, I cannot refrain here from expressing my dismay and heartbreak over a civil servant’s personal resignation to the loss of civil liberty among the people by whom he is employed to protect and serve. If he no longer affirms the rights and freedom of his fellow citizens, one can only wonder exactly what he has in view as the purpose of his profession.

The TSA investigator arrived and asked for my account of the situation. I explained that the agents weren’t allowing me to pass through the checkpoint. He told me he had been advised that I was refusing security screening, to which I replied that I had willingly walked through the metal detector with no alarms, the same way I always do when commuting to work. He then briefed me on the recent screening policy changes and, apparently confused, asked whether they would be a problem for me. I stated that I did indeed have a problem with the infringement of my civil rights and liberty.

His reply: “That’s irrelevant.”

It wasn’t irrelevant to me. We continued briefly in the conversation until I recognized that we were essentially repeating the same discussion I’d already had with the other officers and agents standing by. With that realization, I told him I did not wish to keep going around and around with them and asked whether he had anything else to say to me. Yes, he said he did, marching indignantly over to a table nearby with an air as though he were about to do something drastic.

“I need to get your information for my report,” he demanded.

“The officer over there just took my information for his report. I’m sure you could just get it from him.”

“No, I have to document everything separately and send it to TSOC. That’s the Transportation Security Operations Center where we report…”

“I’m familiar with TSOC,” I assured him. “In fact, I’ve actually taught the TSA mandated security portion of our training program at the airline.”

“Well, if you’re an instructor, then you should know better,” he barked.

“Really? What do you mean I ‘should know better’? Are you scolding me? Have I done something wrong?”

“I’m not saying you’ve done something wrong. But you have to go through security screening if you want to enter the facility.”

“Understood. I’ve been going through security screening right here in this line for five years and never blown up an airplane, broken any laws, made any threats, or had a government agent call my boss in Houston. And you guys have never tried to touch me or see me naked that whole time. But, if that’s what it’s come to now, I don’t want to enter the facility that badly.”

Finishing up, he asked me to confirm that I had been offered secondary screening as an alternative “option” to ATS, and that I had refused it. I confirmed. Then he asked whether I’d “had words” with any of the agents. I asked what he meant by that and he said he wanted to know whether there had been “any exchange of words.” I told him that yes, we spoke. He then turned to the crowd of officers and asked whether I had been abusive toward any of them when they wanted to create images of my naked body and touch me in an unwelcome manner. I didn’t hear what they said in reply, but he returned and finally told me I was free to leave the airport.

As it turned out, they did reach the chief pilot’s office in Houston before I was able to. Shortly after I got home, my boss called and said they had been contacted by the TSA. I suppose my employment status at this point can best be described as on hold.

This took place today, 15 October 2010. The dialog above is quoted according to my best recollection, without embellishment or significant alteration except for the sake of clarity. I would greatly appreciate any recommendations for legal counsel – preferably a firm with a libertarian bent and experience resisting this kind of tyrannical madness. This is not a left or right, red or blue state issue. The very bedrock of our way of life in this country is under attack from within. Please don’t let it be taken from us without a fight.

Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

Michael S. Roberts
901.237.6308
FedUpFlyers@nonpartisan.com
 

Going2Baja

Well-known member
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My advice - not worth much, but CALL you ALPA REP & say NOTHING. This could blow up quickly.

Good luck!!

Baja.
 

Shrek

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You should take manhood pills so then you wouldn't fear the naked scanner.......

You called your ALPA rep I suppose right?......
 

KarmaPolice

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Your best bet for fighting it would be the ACLU, obviously. But even they aren't taking on this one from what I can tell.

It's hard to accept the new reality of how much "civil liberty" we give up at airports in the post 9-11 world. I don't blame you for drawing a line, but my gut tells me you're eventually going to have to decide between your career and your civil liberty principles.

Call me "Brainwashed", but if the AITs stop one terrorist act in my lifetime, then all the screenings were worth it.

The "where will the line be drawn" argument is moot. We can fight new technologies as they emerge, and if a true consensus agrees it's gone too far, it can be halted right then and there. (the robot anal probe machine). The consensus agrees (at least tacitly) that this is not too great a breach of our liberties based on the benefit we receive.

Good luck to you though, that sounded like a really crappy day.
 

najet

Active member
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I had the same thing happen in TPA last August, after the TSA scolded me and my crew for not using the employee line (which was unmarked at 0445, by the way ). I suggested they find a way to identify the crew lane with a sign, at which time the agent told me, I too, had had go through the full-body scanner, instead of the magnetometer that most of the pax were using. I told him he was just being vindictive and then he made me sit in a little chair ( very demeaning, surrounded by my soon-to-be passengers) while summoning the "supervisor". Supervisor shows up and politely explains that "lots of crewmembers have issues with TPA security screening" as though its something they should be commended for........

I got names and a phone number to call, to no avail.....

As much as I enjoy showing my manhood to uniformed strangers, isn't there some slightly greater level of radiation with the full-body scanner versus magnetometer (albeit, only slightly) that could cause long-term damage?

P.S. - No union rep to call, either!
 

chqflyer

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An on duty flight attendant was busted smuggling 22 grams of cocaine in her waistband last week. She was busted by the nudie scanner, so I can imagine that type of screening will soon be required for all crewmembers.
 

Tail Gunner Joe

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Apr 22, 2005
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My screenname plays dis- homage to a man who would have us (falsely) trade away our freedoms for security.
We still have not learned that lesson.

Sincerely,
Tail Gunner Joe
FI member since 04-22-2005
 

Av8rPHX

The Dude abides...
Joined
Mar 27, 2003
Posts
323
Total Time
enough
Stories like this make me glad I left the airlines when I did, and that I only have to travel a few times a year now. That being said, unfortunately the majority of the flying public falls into the "anything if it makes us safer" crowd. Until the once a year Joe Six Pack crowd starts having an uproar to the security theatre in place nothing will change and it will only get worse. To the response about the higher radiation levels, they actually havent been fully tested to determine the long term effects to exposure.
 

180ToTheMarker

12 months of October
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Feb 18, 2003
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My rational side says we should collectively fight this thru ALPA by using lawyers, etc...

My emotional side says that ALPA should come out with this directive: "As of Jan 1st, 2011 CrewPass will be implemented at all airports with 121 service, otherwise we will invoke a national S.O.S. and no 121 airline will fly that day."

Unfortunately the above will never happen because we dont have the balls to do it...
 

Dornier 335

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To the response about the higher radiation levels, they actually havent been fully tested to determine the long term effects to exposure.

There was a discussion about this about 8 months ago. Here's my previous post:

There's one thing though that worries me about body scanners: Possible radiation risk. The scanner by L-3 uses THZ-radiation. (some parts taken from another bb)

Terahertz radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Recent scientific research by university of Tel Aviv and Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico suggest health risks are present.

RARE Online - Terahertz Radiation Increases Genomic Instability in Human Lymphocytes

"Our results demonstrate that exposure of lymphocytes in vitro to a low power density of 0.1 THz radiation induces genomic instability. These findings, if verified, may suggest that such exposure may result in an increased risk of cancer."

Technology Review: Blogs: arXiv blog: How Terahertz Waves Tear Apart DNA

"This should set the cat among the pigeons. Of course, terahertz waves are a natural part of environment, just like visible and infrared light. But a new generation of cameras are set to appear that not only record terahertz waves but also bombard us with them. And if our exposure is set to increase, the question that urgently needs answering is what level of terahertz exposure is safe."

The media focus is on privacy issues from many sides; important, but one should not forget health issues. As a flight crew member, I don't want to be exposed to radiation risk and pay the price because of nutcases who try to blow up planes.
 

79%N1

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I understand why he was upset. The normal screening method that he used week in week out was no longer good enough for TSA, so they want to use a new scanning method all of a sudden. He passed through the magnetometer as always with no issue, yet now a full frisking is also required - FOR A UNIFORMED CREW MEMBER - in addition to the normal screening. All because he declined their new scanner. Why are we subjected to this BS!?!?
 

pilotyip

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I am a robot going through TSA, what ever is ask, I do. Recently a screener saw something in my rear pocket and asked what is was, I told her it was a handkerchief. She said let me see it, I pulled in out and held it front of me, she yelled "Get that dirty thing out of my face" I asked what would you like me to do with it? she said "Are you getting smart with me?. I said "No I am doing my best to try and follow your instructions, what would you like me to do next? SERE school training comes in handy sometimes
 

Flybywire44

Flies With The Hat On
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You can opt out of the new scanner and go through the metal detector, but they have the right to frisk you if they want to. Refusing the frisk is where you created your own problem.

The TSA is a bureaucracy, The Constitution is not even honored by police officers. Why would would the TSA subscribe the notion of your rights? Your rights are immediately suspended the moment you interact with law enforcement until you leave security.

You're just a number in the airport, cooperate to Graduate.
 
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Kermit_D_Frog

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Jan 9, 2006
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Please don't back down from this. Thank you for having the courage to fight this indignity. It is ridiculous that working, uniformed pilots are subjected to this government stupidity. Crew Pass Now! Keep us updated.
 

Auburn_CFI

Gone fishing.
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Apr 29, 2005
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Why not just go through the scanner? It only takes about 15 seconds? I really just can't wrap my brain around why this has everyone in such a state of disarray?
 

Dornier 335

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Why not just go through the scanner? It only takes about 15 seconds? I really just can't wrap my brain around why this has everyone in such a state of disarray?

Did you read up on the possible health risks that those bodyscanner pose? You may want to think twice about stepping through it.

You can opt out of the new scanner and go through the metal detector, but they have the right to frisk you if they want to. Refusing the frisk is where you created your own problem.
I thought that UNIFORMED crew members are still exempt from being strip-searched even if they decline the new virtual strip search scanner?
 

paulsalem

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4th Amendment:

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
 
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