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The purpose of "takeoff trim" durring a decent???

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Not talking about glides, but about a standard decent, under power, from traffic pattern altitude. Now I've got the procedure burned into my head pretty good. Opposite TD point...carb-heat, 2000RPM, 1st notch flaps, and take-off trim. But why the take-off trim? I do beleive I remember my instructor saying something about it compensating for the nose-down pitch induced by flap extension. But we usually end up holding the nose down anyway. So it's almost like, why trim it up if you want to go down???

My only guesses are maybe:

It helps you out durring the landing flare???

It eliminates the need to establish TO trim while rolling for the next takeoff???

...or maybe it really is nothing more than a compensation for dropping the flaps?

Any information would be greatly appreciated!
 
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minitour

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Can't help ya...never heard of that.

I like to trim for a 'hands free' descent to the runway.

-mini
 

gkrangers

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minitour said:
Can't help ya...never heard of that.

I like to trim for a 'hands free' descent to the runway.

-mini
Hey mini, whats the purpose of having an engine on an airplane ?

I just can't figure this out.

Thanks for the help.
 

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gkrangers said:
Hey mini, whats the purpose of having an engine on an airplane ?

I just can't figure this out.

Thanks for the help.
You are f**king hilarious. Far be it from you, to withhold you obnoxious, degrading remarks to a simple question from a student pilot. You are nothing more than a dumbass troll. May you burn in Hell.
 

minitour

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gkrangers said:
Hey mini, whats the purpose of having an engine on an airplane ?

I just can't figure this out.

Thanks for the help.
An inquiring mind isn't a bad thing. My best students are the ones that ask the most questions. They want to know the why rather than just the what.

The guys that struggle the most are the ones that want me to teach them the checkride or just enough to get by. I'm not a believer in that.

Maybe I'm the only one here that feels this way, but I think learning is great! I love to learn which is one of the reasons I'm liking flight instruction more and more.

If it's such a lame-o question, you should know the answer, right?

If you're being serious...then to answer your question...I don't know. Get some glider time. I intend to add a glider rating and CFI-G to my certificiates at some point this coming summer. At least the commercial glider. Form what I've read, it really teaches you how to fly the wings rather than forcing the airplane to do what you want.

Someone on here is always saying if they had it their way, they'd require some glider time for the PPL and I'm starting to agree....so...that's my take on why do airplanes have engines.

As for wings...I think you're being a little rediculous.

-mini
 

LAXSaabdude

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I think "takeoff trim" may just be a gouge your instructor may have come up with for the aircraft you are flying. He just learned, through experience, that it marks the optimal position for the trim for the descent in the pattern.

May not work with all aircraft, though, so don't get too used to it when you switch to something else.

LAXSaabdude.
 

UnAnswerd

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LAXSaabdude said:
I think "takeoff trim" may just be a gouge your instructor may have come up with for the aircraft you are flying. He just learned, through experience, that it marks the optimal position for the trim for the descent in the pattern.

May not work with all aircraft, though, so don't get too used to it when you switch to something else.

LAXSaabdude.
I see. Thanks for the input.
 

pilotmiketx

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You should always trim for neutral control force. The only time to set trim to takeoff is for, you guessed it, takeoff.

I've found a few instructors over the years who think its too much trouble to spend more than a cursory few minutes on the proper use of elevator trim. I've discovered these f-ing lazy idiots because I've had to re-train their students after a checkride failure, new rating or when upgrading to bigger aircraft.
 

FN FAL

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pilotmiketx said:
You should always trim for neutral control force. The only time to set trim to takeoff is for, you guessed it, takeoff.

I've found a few instructors over the years who think its too much trouble to spend more than a cursory few minutes on the proper use of elevator trim. I've discovered these f-ing lazy idiots because I've had to re-train their students after a checkride failure, new rating or when upgrading to bigger aircraft.
You said it brother...I don't why teaching and using trim is such a big bugga boo.
 

gkrangers

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FN FAL said:
You said it brother...I don't why teaching and using trim is such a big bugga boo.
Point plane where you want, move trim wheel till its steady.

*shrugs shoulders*
 

pilotmiketx

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I asked this dumb anorexic Norwegian bimbo CFI about it and she said it bothered her that students were constantly fiddling with the trim wheel, so she stopped teaching it.
 

FN FAL

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pilotmiketx said:
I asked this dumb anorexic Norwegian bimbo CFI about it and she said it bothered her that students were constantly fiddling with the trim wheel, so she stopped teaching it.
In a two place trainer, there shouldn't be much "fiddling". Jeeze, it's not like you got two tandem masters in the back of the plane moving about with their students during "hookup".
 

Bongo

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Just stopped teaching it eh? It might be alright to fly "training" type aircraft in an out of trim condition but there are many, many aircraft that are considerably more difficult, if not impossible to fly without using the trim wheel. Probably better to learn the operation of the trim wheel on something that is generally forgiving than on something that is considerably less forgiving.

When I first started out I really didn't think the trim wheel was that important. Ah, if you're not muscling the airplane around then you must not be flying it right. Quickly (well it took a few hours) figured out that probably wasn't the best way to do things.

Additionally, by not teaching the use of the trim wheel, it later on becomes "one more step" to add to the flow and an additional thing to think about. If the use of trim is taught properly and from the start it becomes something that is done without any forethought.
 

Immelman

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Food for thought: In better than half the (rental) airplanes I've flown, the trim indicator is so messed up that attempting to move it to the "takeoff" position -- even for takeoff -- will not have very desirable results.... trim for control pressure in a given configuration & desired airspeed, that's all there is to it.
 

Kream926

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UnAnswerd said:
I do beleive I remember my instructor saying something about it compensating for the nose-down pitch induced by flap extension.
the airplanes i fly will have a pitch up moment when i extend flaps
 

moxiepilot

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i'm thinking that it might be more along the lines of verifing that you're not going to have a trip up stall in case of a go around. without the power on a descent the student might not recognize the position of the trim tab
 

Moonfly201

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Think of the trim wheel as an "airspeed" adjuster. Any action (whether it's a change in pitch, power, or flaps) that causes the airspeed indicator to register a different airspeed, will most likely require an adjustment of trim in order to relieve control wheel pressure.

Go faster, trim down. Slow up, trim up. Don't chase the trim for minor or temporary changes in airspeed (like turbulence induced), use it when you want to stay at a particular speed for at least a little while.
 

darkvw

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I trim for best glide , then it's hands off all the way down , changing as needed
 
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