• NC Software is proud to announce the release of APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook version 10.0. Click here to view APDL on the Apple App store and install now.

should I buy a cessna for training?

comander

f#ck kfc!
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Posts
148
Total Time
101
How does it work, what type of ratings can I get in my own c-150 or c-172?
can I get commercial licence in a c-150? or cfi? what happens with multi after that?
how expensive is the insurance, and how easy is it to sell the plane later on?
How many of you people have done this, and how good has it result?
thanks in advance!
 

doug_or

And he's been drinking!
Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Posts
411
Total Time
Low
You'll need retracts and a constant speed prop for the CFI and commercial.
 

Almerick07

Professional Surf Bum
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Posts
407
Total Time
.02
Well if youre serious about buying an airplane for training puposes go with a C-172RG, nice little 180hp cont. pulling a complex body. It will get you all the way from PPL-CFI (minus multi) as far as multi goes you need 15 hours which comes to about 3 large. An option I would look at is to lease it to the flight school you want to take lessons from, they could probably work out a deal as far as dual instruction goes and it makes cost of ownership more feasible. Down side to this are insurance goes up (used for instruction) and MX is increased 100 hour inspection opposed to an annual. Im not too sure on the numbers but if you had the cash to buy an RG this might be your best bet. Airplanes are like houses, keep it maintained and maybe improve it a little and you will get your money out of it.
 

viper548

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 30, 2004
Posts
2,090
Total Time
6800
You can buy a 152 or 172 and just rent a retract for the 10 hours of commercial training and the checkride.
 

ToiletDuck

Ninja
Joined
Apr 23, 2005
Posts
598
Total Time
>1
How do you know who has and hasn't? As far that the leasing it to the flight school goes that's not a bad idea. It was a pretty big practice at McGregor Tx at one time. Not exactly sure what deal the own had with them but anytime he wanted it he took it. Can't be too bad. Wouldn't hurt to make sure the mx program is a good one though.
 

lasflyer

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Posts
9
Total Time
900+
I would think that the most cost effective means of building time and earning ratings and certificates would be to buy into a partnership or flying club. True, you only need 10 hours of retractable time for the commercial, but with only 10 hours you'll have trouble with both insurance companies and prospective employers. If you intend to make this a career you will need considerably more time in complex retractables.

A few years back I bought a share of an older Mooney. I was able to build a few hundred hours of retrac time and become proficient again at instruments and the cost ran about 500 a month for everything except fuel, and that included hanger, maintenance, insurance, engine reserve and 10 hours of flight time. Additional hours were $50 if I recall correctly. I did buy in for my share but got more when I sold.
 

DrProc

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 13, 2005
Posts
366
Total Time
3500
Buy a Cessna 150, or Cub, or a Taylorcraft. Get your private and log 150 or so hours, then sell and buy a Warrior or 172 for your instrument. Rent a retractable for commercial and CFI
 

viper548

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 30, 2004
Posts
2,090
Total Time
6800
cougar6903 said:
LoL, Love all the advise from people who have never owned an aircraft.

Many pilots that haven't owned have extensivly researched it though. I researched buying a PA-28 to do my training, but I wouldn't have been able to use my VA benefits, so it didn't work for me. I would suggest getting a practical plane for training, ie 152, 172, pa-28
 

NuGuy

Ex-Commuter
Joined
May 30, 2003
Posts
2,375
Total Time
10000
Heyas,

I'd have to go with BD here. Get a 150...MUCH cheaper than a 152. There are more of them, and you can find one with half the hours and half the cost of a 152.

A 172 would also work, but since they are more in demand from the causal flyer crowd, you will pay a premium for the extra 2 seats. The fuel you save will give you an extra hour of flying in every 4.

Don't even think about an RG or a high perf. The insurance will eat you alive. The money you save will be worth tens of hours of flying.

Nu
 

DaveJ

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 15, 2002
Posts
111
Total Time
2780
I bought a 150 right after getting my private and used it for everything up to CFI (rented an Arrow for the commercial ride). Worked out great. Plus you build plenty of time on the x-countries because the thing is so darned slow!
 

JimNtexas

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2001
Posts
1,590
Total Time
2000
ToiletDuck said:
How do you know who has and hasn't? As far that the leasing it to the flight school goes that's not a bad idea. It was a pretty big practice at McGregor Tx at one time. Not exactly sure what deal the own had with them but anytime he wanted it he took it. Can't be too bad. Wouldn't hurt to make sure the mx program is a good one though.

Leaseback is a suckers game, otherwise the FBOs would buy their own planes to begin with.

The best thing for the new student to do if he is committed to aviation would be to buy a C-150 with a good pre-buy and recent annual. The really great thing about that is that with your C-150 you can get that 1200 hours you need for part 135 quickly and cheaply, and maybe not have to spend as long instructing fat smelly old farts like me.
 

NuGuy

Ex-Commuter
Joined
May 30, 2003
Posts
2,375
Total Time
10000
JimNtexas said:
Leaseback is a suckers game, otherwise the FBOs would buy their own planes to begin with.

The best thing for the new student to do if he is committed to aviation would be to buy a C-150 with a good pre-buy and recent annual. The really great thing about that is that with your C-150 you can get that 1200 hours you need for part 135 quickly and cheaply, and maybe not have to spend as long instructing fat smelly old farts like me.

Jim is correct. Leasebacks are for suckers. The FBO/flight school will nick you for cash comming and going and charge you to use your own aircraft on top. The very, very best you could hope for is to marginally decrease the cost of your hours as opposed to renting, and for that, it's certainly not worth the trouble, lost utility and expense.

The ONLY way to "make" any money with this game is to buy an aircraft NEW, and then use the provisions of the accelerated depreciation schedule currently allowed by federal tax law, and then sell the aircraft in a year or two. But you have to have a business already set up, and there has to be enough cash flow to make the deduction worth anything. In other words, unless you already have the cash, it's not worth it.

That's the only reason you see new aircraft for leaseback. The owners don't give 2 $hits if they fly or not (thus the insane rental rates), because they make their money off the back end with the depreciation and the sell off. It's really just a tax dodge.

Nu
 

JimNtexas

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 1, 2001
Posts
1,590
Total Time
2000
A1FlyBoy said:
Isn't this "rich boy" PFT?

Not when we're talking C-150 for a person willing to sacrifice other things in his life.

Now, a lot of you "poor boys" are only "poor" because you got married young just because you didn't want to take a chance on not getting laid for another year, bought a nice car on credit, had a kid you can't afford, smoke, drink, and sniff glue, and then wonder why you can't afford to fly.
 

navigator72

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
913
Total Time
1700+
Buy a Super Cub put some bid ol' tundra tires on it and take it to Alaska.
 
M

mnalpha

do that thing that jesse james did to a car. he put some wings on it and a prop and it flew. Thats what I would do, then you could also drive like a cabby if you did not want to fly some day.
 
Top