R.i.p.

propilot

Go Sioux!
Joined
Nov 30, 2001
Posts
357
Total Time
7800
Rip

For the UND guys and gals on here in case you hadn't heard. Alumni and Fraternity Brother(DTD)...


Elliot D. Dewey
[url="http://www.legacy.com/images/General/NoticeGuestBookButton.gif"]http://www.legacy.com/images/General/NoticeGuestBookButton.gif[/url] Dewey Elliot D., age 25, recently of Los Angeles, CA, formerly of Minnetonka, MN. 2004 Graduate Commercial Aviation, University of North Dakota. Died on 9/11 in an aircraft crash while in a training flight after the aircraft experienced mechanical failure. "Absent from the body is present with the Lord." Survived by Mom & Dad, Cherry & Don Dewey of Victoria; siblings, Ryan, Joel, Elise; uncles & aunts, many friends. Visitation Fri., 6-8 PM Ridgewood Church, 4420 County Road #101, Minnetonka, MN (952) 474-0858. Memorial Service Sat., 10 AM, Ridgewood Church. Memorials preferred to Mission- ary Aviation Fellowship. Obit info albinchapel.com Albin Chapel-Eden Prairie Ralph, Jim, Dan Albinson (952) 914-9410
 
Last edited:

GINCHBLASTER

Registered Abuser
Joined
Jul 14, 2005
Posts
223
Total Time
18.3
my condolences to his family and friends. What was the mechanical failure?
 

FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Total Time
7,000+
GINCHBLASTER said:
my condolences to his family and friends. What was the mechanical failure?
Probably this one...

********************************************************************************
** Report created 9/14/2005 Record 1 **
********************************************************************************

IDENTIFICATION
Regis#: 6565L Make/Model: C152 Description: 152, A152, Aerobat
Date: 09/11/2005 Time: 2245

Event Type: Accident Highest Injury: Fatal Mid Air: N Missing: N
Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
City: LAKEWOOD State: CA Country: US

DESCRIPTION
ACFT ON DEPARTURE, REPORTED POOR CLIMB PERFORMANCE, REQUESTED TO RETURN TO
THE AIRPORT, CRASHED 1/2 MILE WEST OF THE LONG BEACH AIRPORT, THE TWO
PERSONS ON BOARD WERE FATALLY INJURED, LAKEWOOD, CA

INJURY DATA Total Fatal: 2
# Crew: 2 Fat: 2 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:
# Pass: 0 Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:
# Grnd: Fat: 0 Ser: 0 Min: 0 Unk:

WEATHER: NOT REPORTED

OTHER DATA

Departed: LONG BEACH, CA Dep Date: Dep. Time:
Destination: LONG BEACH, CA Flt Plan: Wx Briefing:
Last Radio Cont:
Last Clearance:

FAA FSDO: LONG BEACH, CA (WP05) Entry date: 09/12/2005
 

FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Total Time
7,000+
2 Die as Plane Crashes Soon After Takeoff
Single-engine aircraft leaving Long Beach Airport plunges into a nearby parking lot and catches fire.

From Times Staff Reports


A single-engine airplane crashed shortly after takeoff from Long Beach Airport on Sunday afternoon, killing both men aboard, authorities said.

The plane crashed at 3:44 p.m. into the rear parking lot of an industrial building in the 3700 block of Industry Avenue, near Bixby Road, in Lakewood, airport and fire officials said. The building is across the street from the airport.

The identities of the two men aboard the plane were not released Sunday evening.

Airport spokeswoman Sharon Diggs-Jackson said she was not aware of any damage to buildings or property on the ground.

But Jeff Reeb, a battalion chief with the Long Beach Fire Department who responded to the crash, said one car was damaged.

Reeb said the plane came down at a "rather steep angle" when it crashed and caught fire.

Authorities did not immediately know the cause of the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board has been called in to investigate.

Weather is not believed to have been a factor because there was no cloud cover or rain at the time the plane took off.

Firefighters from Long Beach and Los Angeles County responded to the scene and quickly put out a small fire, said county fire dispatch supervisor Art Marrujo.

A passerby, Brent Hatcher, 17, said he was walking with his friends to an arcade when "we saw a big cloud of black smoke."

"They put it out real quick," he said.
 

FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Total Time
7,000+
NTSB releases prelim:
NTSB Identification: LAX05FA296
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 11, 2005 in Lakewood, CA
Aircraft: Cessna 152, registration: N6565L
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On September 11, 2005, about 1545 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 152, N6565L, collided with terrain at Lakewood, California. Aviation West Flight School was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and the student pilot sustained fatal injuries; the airplane was destroyed. The local instructional flight departed Daugherty Field, Long Beach, California, and had been airborne about 1 minute. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The approximate global positioning system (GPS) coordinates of the primary wreckage were 33 degrees 49.79 minutes north latitude and 118 degrees 976 minutes west longitude.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane departed runway 25 right at Daugherty Field. About 30 seconds later, the pilot reported poor climb performance, and requested to return to the airport.

Numerous witnesses observed the airplane. They reported that it was low, and appeared to be going slow. The engine maintained the same sound; it was not coughing, sputtering, or backfiring. It sounded like it was at a low rpm (revolutions per minute). They reported that the nose was up, the wings were rocking, and the tail was moving back and forth. The right wing then dropped about 90 degrees, and the nose went nearly straight down.

The airplane came to rest behind a building. The right wing was under a truck, and the truck's front left wheel was on top of the right horizontal stabilizer. The right side of the fuselage and the vertical stabilizer rested against the truck's front bumper. Fire consumed most of the cabin area.
 

MDAutry

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 13, 2005
Posts
100
Total Time
750
Was it in a spin?
 

User546

The Ultimate Show Stopper
Joined
Jan 24, 2004
Posts
1,959
Total Time
+1500
From the NSTB prelim that FN FAL posted:
" It sounded like it was at a low rpm (revolutions per minute)."

What's the point of using acronyms if you're going to write it all out anyways?
 

BushwickBill

Registered Abuser
Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Posts
822
Total Time
more
MDAutry said:
Was it in a spin?
It's easy to be the monday morning quarterback but it sounds like a spin. You can't turn the plane around if its too low. Even if all thats in front of you are buildings and crowded roads you still cant turn the airplane around at low altitude. I'm not saying that I could have done any better. It's just sad to see the same mistake repeated over and over usually resulting in death. I try and tell all my students: 300' from pattern altitude make your crosswind turn. OH, and by the way this is when its safe to turn back to the runway. Until then its straight ahead and aim at the smallest tree.

Fly Safe
 

JediNein

No One Special at all
Joined
Apr 28, 2002
Posts
1,256
Total Time
53 wks
BushwickBill said:
300' from pattern altitude make your crosswind turn. OH, and by the way this is when its safe to turn back to the runway. Until then its straight ahead and aim at the smallest tree.

Fly Safe
Not all aircraft can make it back to the runway at 500 or even 700 feet AGL. If I'm on my game and have practiced the 'impossible turn' recently, I can make a 172 or a Warrior back to the departure runway at 700'. Most of the time it's 800' AGL before the attempt will become successful. If one has a high performance single, forget it, the numbers increase to 1000' or more before the turn back to the field, even the 180 turn to land on the taxiway or the grass is iffy.

I lost 6 friends on December 23, 2004 to the impossible turn. The pilot (my friend, mentor, and an excellent flight instructor) knew better, but tried it anyways.

Something my Dad told me when I was learning to drive applies to engine failures after takeoff in singles: "When crashing, aim at the softest, cheapest thing possible."

Fly SAFE!
Jedi Nein
 

Foxcow

screwed
Joined
Sep 15, 2004
Posts
343
Total Time
meh...
He was a good kid. One of my good friends was his roommate and called me to tell me what had happened. We all went to school together.
 

BushwickBill

Registered Abuser
Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Posts
822
Total Time
more
JediNein said:
Not all aircraft can make it back to the runway at 500 or even 700 feet AGL. If I'm on my game and have practiced the 'impossible turn' recently, I can make a 172 or a Warrior back to the departure runway at 700'. Most of the time it's 800' AGL before the attempt will become successful. If one has a high performance single, forget it, the numbers increase to 1000' or more before the turn back to the field, even the 180 turn to land on the taxiway or the grass is iffy.

I lost 6 friends on December 23, 2004 to the impossible turn. The pilot (my friend, mentor, and an excellent flight instructor) knew better, but tried it anyways.

Something my Dad told me when I was learning to drive applies to engine failures after takeoff in singles: "When crashing, aim at the softest, cheapest thing possible."

Fly SAFE!
Jedi Nein
First off I dont want to change the subject here. Its a tragic subject but maybe we can take something away from this and learn something. I do have a question for you: How would you safely teach this to a student? You cant really pull the engine on the departure leg. Not to mention at an airport with a tower. Its hard to drill this into a student without practice. I've found that I never really learn anything until I do it myself at least once.

I was mostly refering to 4-3-2 c. 6 of the AIM when I mentioned 700 AGL. I know there isn't a real set altitude. I still remember when my instructor pulled the towrope during my pre solo glider checkout at 200 feet.
 

FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Total Time
7,000+
I almost got buggered up twice in 152's that had mechanical failures.

One was a mag that became ineffective after it was too late to set the plane down on the runway and one that had a mixture lever fail somewhere between off and full on.

They might be simple planes, but their lack of instrumentation makes them more dangerous in my book.

Before I get attacked on the mag one...I know, no instrumentation will help you there. However, a fuel flow gauge or an EGT guage would have helped me figure there was something wrong in the mixture incident.

Let's not jump to conclusions on this pilot, but let us reflect on our own flights and future flights we may embark on. I'm not saying speculation is off limits, but don't beat on the decedent. He did the best he could with what was dumped on him.
 

mtrv

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2004
Posts
156
Total Time
500-
BushwickBill said:
First off I dont want to change the subject here. Its a tragic subject but maybe we can take something away from this and learn something. I do have a question for you: How would you safely teach this to a student? You cant really pull the engine on the departure leg. Not to mention at an airport with a tower. Its hard to drill this into a student without practice. I've found that I never really learn anything until I do it myself at least once.
One advantage of flying radio control for many years, and especially with the heavier models such as quarterscales with high wing loadings; was a lot of first hand looks at the result of departure stalls, 180+ degree return to the runway stall/spin scenarios, turn to final cross-controlled stall/spin & accelerated stall/spin.

This is experience with out actually being on board, but the results are the same, and it stays in your mind.
 

bugchaser

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2002
Posts
295
Total Time
10k+
Easiest way I've found to demo this to students is to set up "hard deck" at say 3000 ft. Then, while at 3k, slow down as if doing a take off/departure stall. Tell them to fly a normal t.o. profile and pull the power at some point. See if they can get turned around before hitting the hard deck. If you have a gps that shows your ground track, it is easy to point out that it takes more than a 180 to get back to the runway. I still believe that the biggest contributer to these types of accidents is the urge to keep pulling when close to the ground. Very hard to push the nose over at 50 ft, unless you are comfortable at low altitudes. There is a natural instinct in all of us to pull back when the ground is coming up to meet us. It has taken me thousands of hours and many many stalls, etc. at extremely low level to get this out of my system. Most pilots are just not exposed enough to this type of thing to overcome the natural reactions.
 

mtrv

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2004
Posts
156
Total Time
500-
bugchaser said:
I still believe that the biggest contributer to these types of accidents is the urge to keep pulling when close to the ground. Very hard to push the nose over at 50 ft, unless you are comfortable at low altitudes. There is a natural instinct in all of us to pull back when the ground is coming up to meet us.
To complicate things a bit farther, I've now seen the results of two accidents, where at the last second, the pilot's gave into the instinct of full aft yoke and saved themselves as well as a passenger. One was student pilot that stalled into a tree in the middle of a crowded shopping center parking lot (out of fuel), and the other was a Cessna 310 stalling against a 45 degree mountain slope. Injuries amounted to no more than small scratches.

Of course, in both scenarios, no altitude was left for a downward spin, and both airplanes were still had flying speed until the stall. Yet, it's just two situations where pulling back, at very low altitude, did the trick.
 

bugchaser

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2002
Posts
295
Total Time
10k+
Of course, in both scenarios, no altitude was left for a downward spin, and both airplanes were still had flying speed until the stall. Yet, it's just two situations where pulling back, at very low altitude, did the trick.
Of course when your about to smack the ground, you should pull back on the stick at the last second. That goes without saying. Not really what I was talking about. Sounds like in those incidents, the pilots had the presence of mind to keep the thing flying until the last instant. Very good. Many accidents have been caused by folks not having this ability.
 

mtrv

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 14, 2004
Posts
156
Total Time
500-
bugchaser said:
Of course when your about to smack the ground, you should pull back on the stick at the last second. That goes without saying. Not really what I was talking about.
No problem. I knew it wasn't what you were talking about. It's more like pushing over at 50', since it's just too high to roll over & dive into the ground & a full stall to dump airspeed at 5' ---------when you're about to clobber an obsticle.
 

MissKittyKat

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 14, 2005
Posts
516
Total Time
5,000
No one likes to hear of this, let us keep the true memory alive of this 25 year old, ( too young to die) alive and well. god bless him and his familiy, sounds like he did something he loved! We all take chances everyday, life is a gift for sure.

I don't know what else to say, other than to think kindly of the deceased.


MissKittyKat

Have a nice evening
 
Top