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Questionable SW MX? what is going on?

Skippy

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Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Posts
561
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N/a
i am by no means making fun of your airline or mx, but seriously, what is the deal with your MX?



FAA Investigates Southwest Over Parts

By ANDY PASZTOR and MIKE ESTERL

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
AUGUST 26, 2009 - Page B4

Federal air-safety regulators have launched an investigation into how unauthorized parts were installed on at least 42 Southwest Airlines Co. jets, and why the carrier's maintenance-control procedures failed to flag the problem, according to people familiar with the details.

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday said the suspect parts -- pieces of a system that is designed to protect movable panels on the rear of the wings from being damaged by hot engine exhaust -- don't pose an "immediate safety issue."

But a dispute between the FAA and the airline kept planes temporarily grounded for part of Saturday, with some flights delayed for four hours or more.

After an FAA inspector's discovery last Friday that certain hinge fittings weren't approved for use on Southwest's fleet of Boeing 737 jets, according to people familiar with the matter, there was a flurry of late-night negotiations between senior airline officials and FAA managers over whether the affected planes could remain in service.

Following the schedule disruptions over the weekend, Southwest and the FAA came up with a mutually acceptable plan to replace the suspect parts in less than two weeks, according to one person familiar with the discussions, though that timetable could be extended. Nonetheless, this person said, the FAA has launched a formal investigation that could end with proposed civil penalties.

More broadly, the controversy illustrates continuing friction between airlines and federal regulators over how to deal with relatively minor maintenance lapses, which violate government rules about the airworthiness of aircraft.

Ashley Rogers, a Southwest spokeswoman, said the airline held 46 aircraft -- or nearly 10% of its fleet -- on the ground from Saturday morning until about

4 p.m. CDT that day, waiting for the FAA and Boeing Co. to sign off on a solution.

"We did have some significant delays throughout the system on Saturday,'' said Ms. Rogers. Some delays were as long as four hours and only 68% of Southwest's flights on Saturday were on time, down from more than 90% typically, she added.

The Southwest spokeswoman said the carrier temporarily grounded the planes "out of an abundance of caution'' and that the FAA told the airline Saturday afternoon that the existing parts were safe. She described it as a "paperwork" issue and played down any differences of opinion with the FAA. She added it was still unclear if Southwest would need to replace the parts in question.

FAA inspectors and managers maintained that since the specific parts were never authorized for aviation use, the planes that had them installed technically weren't fit to carry passengers. Only an airline can ground its aircraft, but carriers don't want to continue flying planes contrary to the FAA's wishes. The agency has authority to impose fines and other penalties when it feels certain planes shouldn't operate.

An FAA spokesman said Tuesday that an inspector uncovered the parts discrepancy "during a routine inspection" and since then, Southwest "has told us it plans to replace all of these parts on the affected planes." The FAA spokesman added: "We are closely monitoring their progress."

Last month, a Southwest jet carrying 126 passengers and five crew members developed a one-foot-wide hole in its main body midflight, and federal investigators are still trying to determine the cause. The incident was a setback for the discount airline just four months after it agreed to pay $7.5 million -- the second-largest civil penalty ever imposed by the FAA against a carrier -- for flying dozens of its older 737s on nearly 60,000 flights between June 2006 and March 2007 without performing necessary structural inspections.
 

rajflyboy

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Joined
Dec 19, 2003
Posts
1,797
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17500
ahhh

No Problem

Herb will just be called back to work and take a bottle of whiskey up to Washington to calm the herd.
 

clickclickboom

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Nov 7, 2005
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Actually if you saw the level of perfection that comes out of there you would not criticize. Plus there are full time SWA inspectors there every day in addition to mx techs..

these issues go well above and beyond the location of the mx..
 

samballs

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Joined
Apr 26, 2005
Posts
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000000
Actually if you saw the level of perfection that comes out of there you would not criticize. Plus there are full time SWA inspectors there every day in addition to mx techs..

these issues go well above and beyond the location of the mx..
So If the facilty is great, full time inspectors there, that must mean that Sw directs this happen and they should not be saying that it was the outsourcing company
 

gupdoc

New member
Joined
May 25, 2008
Posts
2
I hate the idea of foreign outsourcing, however, TACA/Aeroman is currently working on only their 2nd SWA A/C. This work was most likely performed at a domestic vendor.
 

luckytohaveajob

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Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Posts
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And is a repeat of past performances. SWA is guilty of the poorest mx practices and the cheapest fares.

SWA sells its retired airframes to foreign operators who kill foreigners. It just like selling a used car with a known problem without disclosing the problem.

SWA purposefully misses inspection deadlines on safety critical items hoping for extensions which are not an option and pays the largest FAA fines of all time.

SWA blows holes in its fuselages.

And when SWA does have a mx issue, it will and has burn its pilots and flight attendants as scapegoats. Heard a story from the late 1990's about a -200 being flown on its first revenue flight after a heavy maintenance inspection. It had a dual hydraulic failure because of poor maintenance.

It landed at a non-station airport in a very crippled condition. The crew initially decided not to evacuate after what appeared to be a normal landing. It was very hot inside and the captain ordered the doors opened for ventilation with the slides not armed because there was no need for an evacuation. After 20 minutes the brakes caught on fire. A successful evacuation occurred after the doors where closed, armed and the slides blown. The company then hung the entire crew for failure to evacuate after their heroic efforts had been overlooked as a result of poor company maintenance.

Do you feel the love? That crew sure didn't.
 
Last edited:

StopNTSing

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 16, 2003
Posts
715
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9500+
And is a repeat of past performances. SWA is guilty of the poorest mx practices and the cheapest fares.

SWA sells its retired airframes to foreign operators who kill foreigners. It just like selling a used car with a known problem without disclosing the problem.

SWA purposefully misses inspection deadlines on safety critical items hoping for extensions which are not an option and pays the largest FAA fines of all time.

SWA blows holes in its fuselages.

And when SWA does have a mx issue, it will and has burn its pilots and flight attendants as scapegoats. Heard a story from the late 1990's about a -200 being flown on its first revenue flight after a heavy maintenance inspection. It had a dual hydraulic failure because of poor maintenance.

It landed at a non-station airport in a very crippled condition. The crew initially decided not to evacuate after what appeared to be a normal landing. It was very hot inside and the captain ordered the doors opened for ventilation with the slides not armed because there was no need for an evacuation. After 20 minutes the brakes caught on fire. A successful evacuation occurred after the doors where closed, armed and the slides blown. The company then hung the entire crew for failure to evacuate after their heroic efforts had been overlooked as a result of poor company maintenance.

Do you feel the love? That crew sure didn't.

Please, tell us how you really feel. I sense you may be holding something back...
 

msmb

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 19, 2005
Posts
175
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Greedy managers skimp on MX and that kills people. SW had better learn fast that the more you "save" on MX the more expensive it will become after the crash. Sad fact of aviation.
 

EMBpilot

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Jun 18, 2003
Posts
434
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ahhh

No Problem

Herb will just be called back to work and take a bottle of whiskey up to Washington to calm the herd.

:)
Plus a few pizzas here and there, a couple of free 737 type ratings to the feds and business as usual.
 

Benjamin Dover

Well-known member
Joined
May 5, 2006
Posts
299
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10K +
And is a repeat of past performances. SWA is guilty of the poorest mx practices and the cheapest fares.

SWA sells its retired airframes to foreign operators who kill foreigners. It just like selling a used car with a known problem without disclosing the problem.

SWA purposefully misses inspection deadlines on safety critical items hoping for extensions which are not an option and pays the largest FAA fines of all time.

SWA blows holes in its fuselages.

And when SWA does have a mx issue, it will and has burn its pilots and flight attendants as scapegoats. Heard a story from the late 1990's about a -200 being flown on its first revenue flight after a heavy maintenance inspection. It had a dual hydraulic failure because of poor maintenance.

It landed at a non-station airport in a very crippled condition. The crew initially decided not to evacuate after what appeared to be a normal landing. It was very hot inside and the captain ordered the doors opened for ventilation with the slides not armed because there was no need for an evacuation. After 20 minutes the brakes caught on fire. A successful evacuation occurred after the doors where closed, armed and the slides blown. The company then hung the entire crew for failure to evacuate after their heroic efforts had been overlooked as a result of poor company maintenance.

Do you feel the love? That crew sure didn't.

Sorry to hear you didn't get the job at SWA lucky, but don't feal bad, several of my buds who are great guys got turned down too. It is kind of bs we only hired (back when we were hirin') only 1/3 or so of everyone interviewed, but oh well. Still a great place here. Great maintenance too btw. Third airline for me also, so I have compared.

Nice story though, I almost wept.
 

canyonblue

Everyone loves Southwest
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Nov 26, 2001
Posts
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Sorry to hear you didn't get the job at SWA .........

No kidding. I haven't seen this much dribble in a while, obviously since we haven't interviewed lately. This guy has major issues, and the weed out process worked again. :laugh:

Hell, I work at the airline and I don't find myself posting as long a manifesto as you, give it up man. :rolleyes:
 

Volasl

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Joined
Jul 13, 2005
Posts
140
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With the amount of regulation that is imposed on all US airlines, it doesnt surprise me at all that companies are trying to find any way possible to save money. Southwest is just the latest to get some bad press which is unusual i admit. Id bet every carrier has done something similiar though. Id hate to know about all the things done at the airlines ive been at.

Until airlines price their product to make a profit and act like a normal business outsourcing will continue. A race to the bottom for us all unfortunately.
 
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