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PDT hires ERAU CAPT grads

d328pilot

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Three Piedmont first officers are a first for Embry-Riddle's CAPT program

ERAU Press Release
July 10, 2005

Daytona Beach, Fla., June 23, 2005 -- Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has placed three graduates of its Commercial Airline Pilot Training (CAPT) program as first officers at Salisbury, Md.-based Piedmont Airlines -- another milestone for the program.

Hillary Breen, Marcus Iammatteo, and Britton Tabor were signed on as first officers by Piedmont shortly after they graduated from the full-immersion program, which trains individuals with no flight experience to the highest standards of the commercial airline industry. Piedmont carries more than three million passengers a year to 49 destinations in the eastern United States, Canada, and the Bahamas with a fleet of 55 deHavilland DHC-8 aircraft.

The three graduates are completing their initial line operating experience with Piedmont and will soon finish qualifying for line flying out of the airline’s New York LaGuardia pilot base.

“We are extremely pleased with the addition of Piedmont Airlines to the list of employers hiring CAPT graduates,” said Gary Morrison, CAPT’s program manager. “We are confident that these three pilots will be successful in their new careers and will make excellent employees for Piedmont.”

Piedmont hired Breen, Iammatteo, and Tabor just after they completed the CAPT Program’s demanding jet airliner DC-9 series type-rating course. The course teaches airline operations skills and expert knowledge about complex jet transport category operations in an airline environment. Training in the Boeing MD-90, a Level-D simulator with modern “glass-cockpit” displays, full-fidelity visual systems, and six-axis motion capabilities, is recognized by the FAA as jet aircraft time. CAPT cadets log at least 100 hours of flight time and gain experience in pilot-in-command and second-in-command positions while earning their DC-9 series FAR Part 61 type rating.

Hillary Breen, from northern Virginia, graduated from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va. The daughter of a Navy pilot, she worked as a reservations and gate agent for United Airlines and a flight attendant for American Airlines before achieving her dream job: professional pilot.

Marcus Iammatteo, originally from Holmdel, N.J., was stationed at Kaneohe Marine Corps Base in Hawaii, where he was a helicopter mechanic. After his discharge, he earned a bachelor degree in professional aeronautics from Embry-Riddle and was completing a graduate degree in aeronautical science when he discovered the CAPT Program.

Britton Tabor, a native of Honolulu, Hawaii, was completing a master’s in theater at the University of North Carolina when the flying bug bit him. After completing the CAPT Program, he worked briefly as a flight instructor at Wilgrove Aviation in Charlotte, N.C., before being hired by Piedmont Airlines.
 

aeronautic1

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New York Daily News

Extra Extra Read All About It...

Three more pilots seek Public Assistance...
 

viper548

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I like how they say it's recognized by the FAA as jet aircraft time. I thought Sim time was sim time and that's all.
Exactly how does flying the MD-90 sim really hel them learn to fly the DHC-8?
 
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viper548 said:
I like how they say it's recognized by the FAA as jet aircraft time. I thought Sim time was sim time and that's all.
Exactly how does flying the MD-90 sim really hel them learn to fly the DHC-8?

How did any of the small single engine airplanes you've flown help you fly the citation?
 

DC8 Flyer

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Good news for the UND guys. This will give the old crustys at PDT someone else to dog on now!

:D
 

d328pilot

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How did any of the small single engine airplanes you've flown help you fly the citation?Today 20:15

I think that fact that you cant freeze a real airplane makes a big difference. Your decision making is different knowing that there is no freeze button.
 

Goose Egg

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Full immersion program, DC-9 type, and $90k later, they end up in the right seat of a Dash 9 just like the rest of us. Nice going, CAPT. How did we ever get on with out you? Never mind that PDT has been hiring guys with 500TT anyway.

-Goose
 

wrxpilot

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The thing that baffles me about this article is how these people can afford it. All the ones listed had previous degrees (some multiple), and not very high paying jobs. I have one undergrad degree, a professional job, and there is NO WAY I could afford $90k. I swear I am doing something wrong here, I don't see where all this money that people have comes from...
 

viper548

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Goose Egg said:
Full immersion program, DC-9 type, and $90k later, they end up in the right seat of a Dash 9 just like the rest of us. Nice going, CAPT. How did we ever get on with out you? Never mind that PDT has been hiring guys with 500TT anyway.

-Goose

That was my point.

Single engine airplanes didn't do much for helping to fly the Citation. Flying piston twins did. The Citation is very easy to fly, easier than a piston twin. I just dont see the point of doing jet training to fly a turboprop. At least in my opinion, jets are easier to fly than props.
 

joepilot29

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Damn all those hours flight instructing down the tubes. I should have just bought some time in a sim....sarcasm. Does that count as multi time? From what I hear that program is a joke and is full of controversy ie: broken promises and lawsuits. The program I went through actually made you flight instruct. But you had to get hired to get that "guarenteed interview." Learned my lesson on that one. Should have gone the FBO route.

I have become a firm believer in doing it the hard way. Struggling as a flight instructor and having students legally try to kill you on a daily basis. I wonder if they teach you how to get out of a near Vmc base to final in a duchess?
 

DX Rick

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What a joke.
 

LarryinTN

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The DC9, er ah I mean MD90, is fast. You fly around at 220kts-250kts while manuevering for approaches. You have lots of power when you're climbing, accellerating and having to level off without busting altitude and airspeed limits. Pitch control is very important in the sim or you'll be all over the place.

After getting the DC9 type rating it should be much easier to learn the Dash 8 which is somewhat slower. Certainly easier than if they hadn't flown anything bigger than a Seminole before.
 

Dash8

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I know one of those three, didn't realize they were a riddle capt, seemed nice enough, fairly grounded in reality too, wasn't exactly a long drawn out conversation though...

sometimes people just don't realize what their getting into...

I've talked to tons of f/a's here at pdt, and at colgan that went to that 'airline academy' in florida, they all agreed it was a huge waste of time and money, but didn't know any better until after... now they know

and knowing is half the battle
 

viper548

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I'm saying it would be much more effective to train in something you might actually fly after training. CRJ/ERJ/EMB-120/DHC-8/BE-1900. Where are these people going to get hired into a DC-9 with 500 hours? It just seems like expensive unnecessary training.
 

FN FAL

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Somebody brings the question about single engine cessna flying? Every flight hour as PIC builds your decision making skills and adds to your experience column...especially if you are continiously learning on every flight.

Don't let anyone kid you that gaining experience in little planes is not worth something...because it is.
 
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