Northwest Pilots Experiencing Code I and Code II

Dangerkitty

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Question for yall.

I was flying to the West Coast Yesterday and about 200-300 Miles East of the Rockies a Northwest Aircraft Checked on with Center and stated to the controller: "Denver Center NWA *** is experiencing Code I and Code II"

My partner and I looked at each other like WTF?

After the controller called back and asked for clarification the NWA Aircraft again stated that they were experiencing Code I and Code II.

Finally when the controller told the NWA Aircraft that he didn't know what in the heck they were talking about, the NWA aircraft then stated that they were receiving Light to Moderate turbulance.

Now I have been flying for quite some time now and I have never heard this type of phraesology. Is this "Code I and Code II crap" actually in the AIM or is it some way that NWA pilots are spreading the word over a possible job action. :rolleyes:
 

swaforme

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Northwest has a turbulence program that uses these codes to describe the severity of the turbulence. They also plot there own turbulence prediction charts.

Southwest purchases this info from NWA and we are now using it as well. We use the codes with the f/a's only.

The reason we buy this info from NWA. We hurt more f/a's than any other airline in turbulence. NWA hurts the least.
 

FlyinHigh737

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Dangerkitty, NWA uses a code (code 1-6) table to relay turbulence to flight crews. The code chart is used to help pilots avoid as well as warn F/A of turbulence that could indanger them and passengers. ACARS also udates crews while in flight to new issued turbulent plots, as well as cnx ones. NWA has the best turbulent avoiding systems in commercial aviation.
 

Dangerkitty

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OK, thanks for the info. Now that you mention it I seem to recall our Chief Pilot at COEX talking to the pilots about us adopting the NWA turbulence reporting program. This was back in the late 90's so I dont know if they actually ever did it.

We were told basically what you guys just stated.

However, why did the flight crew relay that info to ATC if the controller wasn't going to recognize that information.
 

miles otoole

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Dangerkitty said:
Question for yall.

I was flying to the West Coast Yesterday and about 200-300 Miles East of the Rockies a Northwest Aircraft Checked on with Center and stated to the controller: "Denver Center NWA *** is experiencing Code I and Code II"

My partner and I looked at each other like WTF?

After the controller called back and asked for clarification the NWA Aircraft again stated that they were experiencing Code I and Code II.

Finally when the controller told the NWA Aircraft that he didn't know what in the heck they were talking about, the NWA aircraft then stated that they were receiving Light to Moderate turbulance.

Now I have been flying for quite some time now and I have never heard this type of phraesology. Is this "Code I and Code II crap" actually in the AIM or is it some way that NWA pilots are spreading the word over a possible job action. :rolleyes:

Are you sure he didn't ask the crew if they ordered a "Code Red?"
 

TWA Dude

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Dangerkitty said:
However, why did the flight crew relay that info to ATC if the controller wasn't going to recognize that information.
Probably for the same reason so many pilots use aviation jargon (ATC, MEL, Weather, etc.) when talking on the PA -- they don't think about it.
 

GunSlinger

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miles otoole said:
Are you sure he didn't ask the crew if they ordered a "Code Red?"

YOUR D@MN RIGHT I ORDERED THE CODE RED!!!











Sorry I coudn't resist.
 
O

OUT

FlyinHigh737 said:
Dangerkitty, NWA uses a code (code 1-6) table to relay turbulence to flight crews. The code chart is used to help pilots avoid as well as warn F/A of turbulence that could indanger them and passengers. ACARS also udates crews while in flight to new issued turbulent plots, as well as cnx ones. NWA has the best turbulent avoiding systems in commercial aviation.


Atmospheric yes, financial no.
 

FN FAL

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miles otoole said:
Are you sure he didn't ask the crew if they ordered a "Code Red?"

Did they forget about Code 7?

Code 1 Acknowledge this Call
Code 2 Proceed Immediately with lights/without Siren
Code 3 Proceed Immediately with lights and Siren
Code 4 No further assistance required
Code 5 Stakeout - Uniformed Officers stay away
Code 6 Out of Vehicle for Investigation
Code 7 Out of Service to eat
 

NuGuy

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Heyas all,

The system actually works pretty slick. On the weather package and the "closeout" (weather update right before door closure), the various "TPs" will be listed. If you are at a terminal, you can get a graphical depiction, otherwise you have to plot them yourself on TP charts in the airplane.

They give the type of turbulence (TRW, frontal, CAT, wave, etc) as well as the lat/longs and nearby VORs, intensity (thats the code stuff you heard), movement (if TWRs) and so on.

Enroute, you will get ACARS updates automatically.

The NWA Met departement has all this stuff worked out to a science. They are usually on the money, and dispatchers will flight plan around the predicted turbulence and/or change cruise altitudes. Flights out west will be planned on "deviation routes", which are printed on NWA Jeppesen high charts.

This all started with trying to predict the mountain wave activity, but the TP system has expanded over the years to include all sorts of things including wind shear (now partially automated through an FAA program), TRWs, high ozone concentrations and volcanic ash.

Sometimes the "code" stuff is used as a joke. For instance, taxiway A in MSP is known to have had "code 2" for years now (light to moderate). But I see they are fixing that.

Nu
 

Mr Hat

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[OK, thanks for the info. Now that you mention it I seem to recall our Chief Pilot at COEX talking to the pilots about us adopting the NWA turbulence reporting program. This was back in the late 90's so I dont know if they actually ever did it./QUOTE] Dangerkitty, Its the wind shear numbers on the flight plan. They only indicate windshear, not severity of turbulence but it is a good indicator as to what you might expect.
 

Oakum_Boy

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"Captain is declaring a Code Brown."

Or, wouldn't you rather say- "Northwest 466 is having a Code 2"

I think the latter is more delicate, gets the idea across, and doesn't embarass any particular crew member.
 

Green

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swaforme said:
Northwest has a turbulence program that uses these codes to describe the severity of the turbulence. They also plot there own turbulence prediction charts.

Southwest purchases this info from NWA and we are now using it as well. We use the codes with the f/a's only.

The reason we buy this info from NWA. We hurt more f/a's than any other airline in turbulence. NWA hurts the least.

AT AWA we purchase the information from NWA as well. Funny thing is that during initial ground school they also told us that our airline hurts more FA's than any other carrier. Maybe that's a standard thing to tell pilots these days so we put down the paper and actually call the fa's once the bumps start. lol.
 

swaforme

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Oh no, I can call them without putting the paper down. Question is, do you pause the movie??
 

apdsm

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SWA is now using it also.
 
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C

Chappysan

Also in use over the Pacific on HF with at least a handful of carriers to simplify radio transmissions. (JAL/ANA/JAZ/Air Japan, maybe Air Mike?)
 
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