Missed Approach Flying Technique

your_dreamguy

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My airline has a requirement to TRACK a runway heading until acceleration height, then to fly a heading.

For example, let's say you are taking off RWY 18 and RWY 18 has a runway heading of 180 deg. Let's say you take-off with a 30 kt cross wind from the right. ATC assigns you to fly runway heading after takeoff. Our company technique would be: after rotation, crab to the right, use the magenta track indicator and keep the track indicator on a heading of 180 until acceleration height. Then at acceleration height we would fly a heading of 180. In other words, at accel height, we would transition such that our heading indicator would read 180 deg.

However, our company never explained missed approach in visual conditions. Let's say RWY 18 accel height is 500' AGL. Let's say you are coming into land on RWY 18 with the same conditions (i.e. 30 kt right crosswind). Visual go-around instructions are to fly runway heading...If I needed to do a go-around, would I assume to TRACK a heading of 180 until accel height, then fly a heading of 180 once accel height is achieved?
 

tzskipper

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Runway heading is not "track". In your scenario, what would happen in parallel runway operations (with departures occurring alongside arrivals)? If you utilize "track" on your miss, and the departing aircraft (upwind) utilized heading, you could potentially find yourself in a bad spot.

Skipper
 

CA1900

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For example, let's say you are taking off RWY 18 and RWY 18 has a runway heading of 180 deg. Let's say you take-off with a 30 kt cross wind from the right. ATC assigns you to fly runway heading after takeoff. Our company technique would be: after rotation, crab to the right...
And very possibly cause a loss of separation with the traffic on the parallel runway. Bad idea.

Runway heading means runway heading. It's specifically explained in the Pilot/Controller Glossary, if you need a reference to get this procedure changed at your company (which you should). Emphasis is mine:

RUNWAY HEADING- The magnetic direction that corresponds with the runway centerline extended, not the painted runway number. When cleared to "fly or maintain runway heading," pilots are expected to fly or maintain the heading that corresponds with the extended centerline of the departure runway. Drift correction shall not be applied; e.g., Runway 4, actual magnetic heading of the runway centerline 044, fly 044.
 

V1rowt8

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I thought this was the Majors thread?
 

ImbracableCrunk

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I thought this was the Majors thread?
Well, my major does the same thing on V1 cuts. Dunno why. Doesn't make sense. Strong crosswind + parallels could get interesting.
 

Benhuntn

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CA1900 is absolutely correct. Went through this in the AF when we first got 75's. Some guys would fly magenta line in leiu of the heading. They lost seperation and almost go a violation. Your SOP should be changed.
 

G4G5

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I havn't been up to CyyZ Toronto in a while but this was the case for the missed approach, fly track not heading. This was the only place that I have seen this on a Jepp chart
 

get2flyin

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AIM specifically says to fly the runway Heading, not the the track, unless specified otherwise.

"Yeah, there's a problem. You, because you're dangerous. Dangerous and foolish. And that makes you dangerous." Val Kilmer as CA Tom Kazanski in Iceman, the Later Years
 

satpak77

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However, our company never explained missed approach in visual conditions. Let's say RWY 18 accel height is 500' AGL. Let's say you are coming into land on RWY 18 with the same conditions (i.e. 30 kt right crosswind). Visual go-around instructions are to fly runway heading...If I needed to do a go-around, would I assume to TRACK a heading of 180 until accel height, then fly a heading of 180 once accel height is achieved?
1. A missed approach is an IFR procedure, regardless of visual conditions or not.

2. With that said, comply with the missed approach procedure on the chart or with ATC instructions. "Lear 85 Yankee is missed...", ATC will advise, "fly published missed" or "fly heading XXX" etc

3. I realize that we all may see a truck pull onto the runway while in VMC and tell tower that we are "going around". Technically, the FAA answer is we are going missed. (This does not HAVE to occur at mins....---> Pretend you are in the soup but simply behind the plane and need to get everything stablized, you will terminate the approach and advise ATC). ATC will tell you some instructions, then in 99% of the cases, contact Departure. If you are in the VFR pattern, and go-around, you will probably be kept on tower freq.





5-5-5. Missed Approach
a. Pilot.
1. Executes a missed approach when one of the following conditions exist:
(a) Arrival at the Missed Approach Point (MAP) or the Decision Height (DH) and visual reference to the runway environment is insufficient to complete the landing.
(b) Determines that a safe approach or landing is not possible(see subparagraph
5-4-21h).

(c) Instructed to do so by ATC.
2. Advises ATC that a missed approach will be made. Include the reason for the missed approach unless the missed approach is initiated by ATC.
3. Complies with the missed approach instructions for the IAP being executed from the MAP, unless other missed approach instructions are specified by ATC.
4. If executing a missed approach prior to reaching the MAP, fly the lateral navigation path of the instrument procedure to the MAP. Climb to the altitude specified in the missed approach procedure, except when a maximum altitude is specified between the final approach fix (FAF) and the MAP. In that case, comply with the maximum altitude restriction. Note, this may require a continued descent on the final approach.
5. Following a missed approach, requests clearance for specific action; i.e., another approach, hold for improved conditions, proceed to an alternate airport, etc.
 

G4G5

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Just Checked the CYYZ plates. The 11-1, 11-2, 11-6 & 11-7 all call for you to Track the runway heading on the missed approach. This is the only place I have seen it call for the Track Vs. Heading.
 

Donsa320

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Just Checked the CYYZ plates. The 11-1, 11-2, 11-6 & 11-7 all call for you to Track the runway heading on the missed approach. This is the only place I have seen it call for the Track Vs. Heading.
Isn't that a contradiction in terms.."track" the runway "heading"?
How about "track" the runway centerline extended? IF that is what they mean. BTW, how does one do that in a generic DC-9 for example?
DC
 

G4G5

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Isn't that a contradiction in terms.."track" the runway "heading"?
How about "track" the runway centerline extended? IF that is what they mean. BTW, how does one do that in a generic DC-9 for example?
DC

You are correct, their was no real good way to describe it, that's why I referenced the approach plates. You are tracking the rwy centerline. I have flown aircraft (Falcon 2000) with a track option. We would transfer the switch from HDG to TRK while coupled to the ILS.
 

Donsa320

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You are correct, their was no real good way to describe it, that's why I referenced the approach plates. You are tracking the rwy centerline. I have flown aircraft (Falcon 2000) with a track option. We would transfer the switch from HDG to TRK while coupled to the ILS.
Oh, I was not commenting on your language, it was in regard to the approach chart language. I understand how it would be done but the fact that RNAV would be required makes me wonder if that is what the Canadians really mean. If you are not RNAV equipped then I guess you should ask for some other missed approach instructions before even starting the approach, no? I would guess that after a few episodes like that, things would be clarified.
Years ago, Toronto deparure control constantly issued clearances based on the LOW charts even when you were above, or going to be above, FL180. One day I got sick of digging out the LOW chart and called them on it. The response was "OK turn left heading 180 and call Cleveland". Cleveland said " I see they are chasing you all over the place....turn right direct Detroit". Toronto can be "different".
 

glasspilot1

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Isn't that a contradiction in terms.."track" the runway "heading"?
How about "track" the runway centerline extended? IF that is what they mean. BTW, how does one do that in a generic DC-9 for example?
DC
Only way I can think of is to track the LOC outbound.
 

Donsa320

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Only way I can think of is to track the LOC outbound.
Well, that might work until you get to the ILS antenna. Now-a-days there is seldom a usable back course. The techs play around with the antennas to get the best possible front course and thereby usually make the back course unflyable. If it is not charted it is usually useless.

DC
 

sinkrate

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My airline has a requirement to TRACK a runway heading until acceleration height, then to fly a heading.
It could be some one is confusing a normal procedure with an engine out procedure. If it is a normal visual go around or IFR missed approach, like every one else has noted, you do what ATC instructs you to do. Separation from other IFR traffic is their responsibility and obstacle clearance is not an issue.

If you are engine out it is a completely different problem. On departure, unless your company has provided you with an engine out procedure, you are only guaranteed obstacle clearance tracking the runway extended center line. If you have a big cross wind you may need to correct for it. If you have a company specific engine out procedure you must tell ATC what you are doing so they can move traffic out of your path. If you are correcting for a crosswind you must tell ATC what you are doing for the same reason. Once you reach ATC's MVA they may start giving you vectors.
 

Donsa320

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It could be some one is confusing a normal procedure with an engine out procedure. If it is a normal visual go around or IFR missed approach, like every one else has noted, you do what ATC instructs you to do. Separation from other IFR traffic is their responsibility and obstacle clearance is not an issue.

If you are engine out it is a completely different problem. On departure, unless your company has provided you with an engine out procedure, you are only guaranteed obstacle clearance tracking the runway extended center line. If you have a big cross wind you may need to correct for it. If you have a company specific engine out procedure you must tell ATC what you are doing so they can move traffic out of your path. If you are correcting for a crosswind you must tell ATC what you are doing for the same reason. Once you reach ATC's MVA they may start giving you vectors.
Very true. Each individual carrier has the responsibility to analyze obstacle clearance for every departure and missed approach for every airport they are authorized at. Basic take off obstacle clearance is something like 50ft clearance 300ft either side of the runway centerline extended up to the enroute structure or as much as 10miles. Wow, try and comply with that in the real world.
Missed approach, that is, approach climb is not quite the same but we did find that, for example, an MD-80 would not comply at BOS on the Runway 27 miss as published and the A-320 for one miss at JFK. That one required a climb and then a turn which would put you in downtown Manhatten before you reached the turn altitude. Missed approach procedures only comply with TERPS not aircraft performance. That is an operator's responsibility.

Good luck out there.

DC
 

monkeybrains01

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This presumes that you have been cleared for an instrument approach. If you have been cleared for a visual then you should under no circumstances fly a published missed approach.





1. A missed approach is an IFR procedure, regardless of visual conditions or not.

2. With that said, comply with the missed approach procedure on the chart or with ATC instructions. "Lear 85 Yankee is missed...", ATC will advise, "fly published missed" or "fly heading XXX" etc

3. I realize that we all may see a truck pull onto the runway while in VMC and tell tower that we are "going around". Technically, the FAA answer is we are going missed. (This does not HAVE to occur at mins....---> Pretend you are in the soup but simply behind the plane and need to get everything stablized, you will terminate the approach and advise ATC). ATC will tell you some instructions, then in 99% of the cases, contact Departure. If you are in the VFR pattern, and go-around, you will probably be kept on tower freq.
 
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