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International Procedures

iLR60Mac

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Do any of you have a suggestion or know of any books that explain the know how of international flying? i.e. northern tracks to/from Europe, the pacific rim, ect.
 

Spooky 1

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Do a Google search for MNPSA 5. It is the latest edition of the MNPS manual that has just been published this summer. If you can't find it, PM me with an email address that I can forward to. It has all the information that you will need for the N. Atlanitic ops. I think AC91-70 is the other source for international ops on a world wide basis. This AC is available on the web as well via Google.
 
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TransMach

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If your company is an NBAA member, they have an outstanding manual in CD form. Another very good idea is to get your employer to send you (or your lead captain) to FlightSafety for their International Procedures course.

There is a lot of things that have changed the last few years. The NAT Tracks/NAT MNPS is just one example of specialized airspace and associated procedures. The Central Eastern Pacific (CEPAC) has different procedurs and requirements. In Europe the EC has established a number of RNP specific procedures. The High Polar Route System has it's special needs and the Central/South Atlantic has it's pecularities. Many times the RNP requisite, contingency requirements/actions, RVSM, strategic offset use, and position reporting are different for each FIR and block of airspace.

My suggestion is that you get real good and knowledgeable before you "coast out" into any of the remote/special airspace blocks.

TransMach
 

Draginass

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ASA has a book on Global Navigation for Pilots. However, the current edition is 1998, so it's very dated.

www.asa2fly.com/product1.asp?SIC=1&product_ID=232%

Most of the major airlines publish booklets for their pilots on the procedures and peculiarites of flying in different regions . . . i.e. South America, North Atlantic, Europe, Pacific Rim, etc. If you have a friend at one of the international majors, perhaps you can get a copy. Of course, those booklets are proprietary and aren't sold to the public.

Also, the side panels of the Jepps Pacific and North Atlantic charts have a good concise synopsis of procedures.

Maybe if we knew the purpose of your question and more specifics, we could help more specifically.
 
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iLR60Mac

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MED said:
Studying for an interview eh?

My company has decided to buy a new CL-604. Instead of flying those Intl. trips by airline they have found a justification to buy a new plane and ride in comfort. I just hope it doesn't spoil them beyond recognition. I am just trying to get my hands on some material before going to training. Not only am I to learn a new plane, I will have to go through Intl. training at the same time. A lot to ingest at one time. You know, learning by fire hose method.

There are just two of us in our flight department. Niether one of us has flown the tracks. We have only been to Latin America and Canada so far. Our boss has bought a nice house in Hawaii. Looks like we'll just have to fly to Hawaii. Darn it all!
 

Godvek

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iLR60Mac said:
My company has decided to buy a new CL-604. Instead of flying those Intl. trips by airline they have found a justification to buy a new plane and ride in comfort. I just hope it doesn't spoil them beyond recognition. I am just trying to get my hands on some material before going to training. Not only am I to learn a new plane, I will have to go through Intl. training at the same time. A lot to ingest at one time. You know, learning by fire hose method.

There are just two of us in our flight department. Niether one of us has flown the tracks. We have only been to Latin America and Canada so far. Our boss has bought a nice house in Hawaii. Looks like we'll just have to fly to Hawaii. Darn it all!

If you company is not MNPS certified/qualified, you will not be entering the tracks and will have to stay below FL280 while crossing.
 

TransMach

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FlightSafety/Simuflite International Procedures Training will be all you'll need. The Hawaiian Organizaed Track System is real straight forward. The NAT Tracks is another story. I would suggest that you take an experienced pilot in your jump seat on the first crossing in the NAT Tracks. It's not a bad idea to take an experienced guy with you to Hawaii the first time, it's just not as "necessary" as the NAT.

TransMach
 

HMR

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Congrats! A new CL-604 should be a pretty sweet ride.
 

Lead Sled

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> enuf
iLR60Mac said:
My company has decided to buy a new CL-604. Instead of flying those Intl. trips by airline they have found a justification to buy a new plane and ride in comfort. I just hope it doesn't spoil them beyond recognition. I am just trying to get my hands on some material before going to training. Not only am I to learn a new plane, I will have to go through Intl. training at the same time. A lot to ingest at one time. You know, learning by fire hose method.

There are just two of us in our flight department. Niether one of us has flown the tracks. We have only been to Latin America and Canada so far. Our boss has bought a nice house in Hawaii. Looks like we'll just have to fly to Hawaii. Darn it all!
I wouldn't get all that worried about it...

It's really not that big of a deal. First of all, take a good international procedures course. There are several of them out there in addition to the ones offered by FlightSafety, etc. (Actually, most of what you really need to know is on the North Atlantic Orientation Chart anyway.)

After you've taken the course, call one of the flight planning outfits like Universal. They're going to be doing most of the work for you. All you really need to know is what questions need to be asked.

80% of the effort involved in international flying is done before you ever depart. That's where you do the most work. The remaining 20% (flying the trip) is the easy and enjoyable part. Get a good international checklist and use it. (PM me with your e-mail address and I'll forward a copy of the one I use.) You shouldn't have any issues. Another thing that I highly recommend is to attend the annual International Operators Conference sponsered by the NBAA. It's basically a graduate level international procedures course. I've been to 5 or 6 of them and they are well worth while. Finally, make sure that you have all of the necessary approvals on your LOA.

Enjoy. Maybe we'll see you in Hawaii.

'Sled
 
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2000flyer

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iLR60Mac said:
Do any of you have a suggestion or know of any books that explain the know how of international flying? i.e. northern tracks to/from Europe, the pacific rim, ect.

FSI has a good program. I've also heard ATI in the DFW area has an excellent course. I'm thinking about doing a recurrent with them for something different. There are several companies that offer International Procedures. You'll just have to do some investigating and see what might be best for you.

2000Flyer
 

pilotmiketx

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Hawaii isn't really any different than going across the gulf to florida except you have to make pos. reports.

Whatever you do, don't take the Simuflite International Procedures course. It's absolutely horrendous. Immagine taking about 8 hours of material and stretching out to 5 days. Our class was taught by some shriveled up retired airline guy (big surprise) who'd never, ever, done any of his own flight planning. Never flown corporate. Never flown GA. And they actually bring in a guy to talk about "security". He ends up talking about not getting hotel rooms on the first floor or above the third floor in case you have to jump, and washing your hands for 2 minutes. If they were smart, they'd take away your shoelaces before class.

Back to the topic, I found out from a Hawaiian FSS guy that you don't have to file an ICAO flight plan to HI. I had been told otherwise. Makes it 10X easier if you're not using a handling service.
 
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