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Hiring Times ?'s

STLCFII

Active member
Joined
Jan 10, 2003
Posts
42
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900+
Hey everyone,

I heard that with regards to hiring times that regionals will take single engine turboprop time the same as multi. Is that true? I have the chance to work for a guy getting hours on a SEL turboprop and was hoping that it could count instead of having to somehow get multi time. It makes sense that it would count since it's a turboprop and more complex. I have my multi with only like 10 hours so it'd be great not to have to pay out the azz for more. Also, do the regionals allow you to fly for hire part time when you're not flying with them? I was hoping to fly for this guy on the side for the first couple years till the pay gets decent. Any info would be appreciated! Thanks!
 

citabriapilot

V Murdda...
Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Posts
361
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7,500
What kind of turboprop? I've never flown one, but at my company people say the twin turboprop we fly is way easier then the high performance piston twin. I guess it all depends on who you talk to.
 

fly4ever

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
Posts
334
Total Time
enough
It won't help you at most regionals including Mesaba. 100 hours multi pic is "generally" the minimum multi time required. Single engine turbine (i.e. Caravan etc...) is not considered more complex than multi piston.

Good Luck
 

Sig

2017
Joined
Aug 29, 2003
Posts
1,348
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100%
Complex? The PBaron was infinitely more complex flight-wise than the PC12, and you can't Vmc a single no matter what it is. And as a rule, no you can't make money flying elsewhere as a 121 pilot. A long, long time ago a fellow at the place I work now was double dipping. Bent up a King Air on one of his extra $$ trips and got HURT. Turns out he was flying an average of 1400 hours a year... whoops. Feds no likey, and neither did the company.

On the up side, lots of folks moved up a number.
 

STLCFII

Active member
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Jan 10, 2003
Posts
42
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Hey guys, Thanks for the replies. Here is the link to the plane. It's an experimental 6 seat turboprop in the process of being certified. The guy is also looking at the twin jet version so I probably should try to push him towards that one. The link to it is below. I was told that a SEL Turboprop looked better than multi hours by a Transmeridian FO so maybe he wasn't in the know. Anymore info/guidance would be appreciated. Thanks!


http://www.epicaircraft.com/epic_lt.html
 

Sig

2017
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Aug 29, 2003
Posts
1,348
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100%
Eh, I think SEL Turboprop PIC enhances a rez with a goodly number of MEL PIC hours. Maybe that's what he meant? Who knows.
 

PSAChiefPilots

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2005
Posts
272
Total Time
>1000
Most airlines want pilots to meet the minimums, currently at most places they require 100 hours of Multi. Single engine is Single engine whether it's TurboProp or not, the only exception is Military Fighter jet. Without the minimums, they are not going to hire you. I have heard from upper level management that PDT has a pilot pool with guys who have 500 TT and 50 Multi but I don't work there. Some airlines have insurance requirements as well but they may differ.

As far as working on the side, PSA will let you do it with permission from upper level management but I do not see them letting you do it for anytime you want. The problem with this is the next thing you now you'd be calling in sick to fly for the extra money thing. Make a decesion, If you want to be an Airline pilot, Go find the multi!
 

surveypilot

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 5, 2003
Posts
249
Total Time
5000+
You also need to understand new aircraft certifications. The projected certification date for the Epic LT is the first quarter of 2006. Airplanes are almost never certified when projected. It can be months or years after this projection before the Epic actually gets certified. Then depending on when the new owners delivery position, is the actual delivery date could be significantly after that. You could easily be a year or more away from having any signicant time in this airplane. I would think that you could find some way to build multi time in that length of time without going out and buying it. I know that it seems like it takes forever to build those first 100 or 200 hours of multi time, but it will come.
 

STLCFII

Active member
Joined
Jan 10, 2003
Posts
42
Total Time
900+
SurveyPilot

The Epic plane is being offered in a Kit also and is being sold presently. It is supposed to take 3 weeks to build their with their factory personel. I don't think the guy has put money down yet, but I'm sure it won't be to far down the road before it could start to be built. One hope I have is that he will buy some multi engine Jet or Turboprop. This will most likely have insurance reqs with a specific number of hours of multi. With any luck, I may be able to get him to pay for us to get the airtime for the insurance. He is currently my student and is wanting to pay me good to keep me around so I'm sure he'll be willing. Thanks everyone for the info, your time giving it won't be wasted. I'm just trying to get a feel for my options before I jump into something.
 
J

jackbo

STLCFII said:
I heard that with regards to hiring times that regionals will take single engine turboprop time the same as multi. Is that true?

nope. remember, it's not about what kind of gas you are burning. it is about controlling a multi-engine plane after you cheese one. you would be better off flying a baron, 310, or duchess for that matter.

a t-prop is not that hard to fly. in fact most find it easier than pistons in many ways.

go get multi-time. anyone who tells you that regionals will accept t-prop single and count it as multi is a moron. get some multi time as soon as you can.

good luck...
 

Regional4life

Well-known member
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May 8, 2005
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142
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6000
Most regionals require the multi time. But here is a little known fact unless your airline has a letter with the local FISDO or they are CMO that accepts this practice and can count SIC time towards PIC time under 121 rules (which can be and has been done, I just don't know which airlines do this.) (I'm also quoting from memory here, so feel free to correct these numbers.)
You need 250 PIC to upgrade, 100 PIC Cross country, 50 PIC night. . . basically, it's the small numbers of a ATP rating that most people forget about, (it's not just 1500 hours). I hear that's what's getting some Pinnacle upgrade captains in trouble. Not the appropriate time coming from their 500 hour wonder pilots. If you don't have those numbers, no upgrade. . . .
 

CaravanMan

Drop eet like eet's hot
Joined
Mar 28, 2005
Posts
519
Total Time
Some
STLCFII said:
Hey guys, Thanks for the replies. Here is the link to the plane. It's an experimental 6 seat turboprop in the process of being certified. The guy is also looking at the twin jet version so I probably should try to push him towards that one. The link to it is below. I was told that a SEL Turboprop looked better than multi hours by a Transmeridian FO so maybe he wasn't in the know. Anymore info/guidance would be appreciated. Thanks!


http://www.epicaircraft.com/epic_lt.html

That's a pretty cool looking airplane!
 

front9

Titanium Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Posts
202
Total Time
46,987
Its a nice plane but...

1. 10 hours of multi will NOT get you a job at most regionals
2. SE Turbo does not substitute for ME time
3. Most airlines frown upon extra flying out side of the company
 

CapnVegetto

The Prince of all Saiyans
Joined
Mar 24, 2005
Posts
1,981
Total Time
4500
Mesa's policy on side flying was that you could do it if you had permission from a chief pilot and reported every bit of flying on the side that you did. Unfortunately, the chances of getting that permission were slim to none since, like a most regionals, the nickel and dime managment would rather keep skeleton staffing and work everybody's butt off, instead of properly staffing the airline to where everyone worked about 700-800 hours a year. You can only fly commercially so many hours a year, and if you time out flying a Kingair on the side for Mr. Joe Rich Guy, and come October or so you've maxed out your yearly hours, your airline is going to be pi$$ed. Or, say you have 4 reserve days in a week, and 3 off. On your 3 off, Mr. Joe Rich Guy decides to fly his Kingair down to the Bahamas, so you end up flying 10 hours there and back on your 3 off. Then you show up to work, on reserve, and what a shock, they're short staffed, so they need you to fly a 4 day trip worth 28 hours. Well, you can only do 20 hours of that trip (30 in 7 days) due to your flying with Joe, so you've screwed the airline. This tends to pi$$ off a primary employer that is paying you a salary.

Bottom line, don't count on it. Once you're at the airline, that's it.
 
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