• NC Software is having a Black Friday Sale Event thru December 4th on Logbook Pro, APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook, Cirrus Elite Binders, and more. Use coupon code BF2020 at checkout to redeem 15% off your purchase. Click here to shop now.
  • NC Software is proud to announce the release of APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook version 10.0. Click here to view APDL on the Apple App store and install now.

"Hi there, I'm Standard"

1x1

Well-known member
Joined
May 28, 2006
Posts
68
Total Time
8K +
Who's heard this on day one of a trip and said to themselves "Oh boy, here we go". I gotta tell ya Captains - those are words an FO cringes at hearing. Maybe some of you captains remember feeling that way too.

9 times out of 10 when us gear bizatches hear that, after leg #2 we got a laundry list of dirt you guys do or don't do that is not SOP. For what it's worth, saying that you are "standard" goes without saying! We all expect each other to live up to our employers rules and procedures when we show up to work. Bringing attention to it is not necessary. So please stop coming into the cockpit with your nuances and pet peeves, and we can all get thru a trip a little easier.

If I ever utter the "Standard" word after upgrading (god help us who are waiting).......shoot me.
 

Stifler's Mom

MILF...MILF...MILF
Joined
Oct 12, 2003
Posts
5,125
Total Time
4000
Never minded hearing those words as an FO. Just meant that I could pretty much expect him to fly the way the training department taught both of us. Even minor deviations from that were really no big deal to me.

You know what the best thing about upgrading to Captain is? Not having to fly with A-hole Captains anymore, because you're the A-hole now.
 

NoJoy

LAMA/400
Joined
Jan 20, 2005
Posts
529
Total Time
10,000
"I follow the checklist"
 

WayBack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Posts
1,153
Total Time
2.4
Who really cares? 99% of the pilots out there aren't standard in some fashion. As long as the job gets done, why complain? That's unless you're the Chief Pilot/Management/Training Department type. Hell, I've even flown with IOE Captains who aren't standard outside of IOE training.
Are you one of those people who can't accept that the same results can be accomplished 1,000 different ways? Or does it have to be done 1 way and way only?
Maybe you're the one that needs to have a beer once in a while and lighten up. Quit taking this job so damn seriously.
So please stop coming into the cockpit with your nuances and pet peeves, and we can all get thru a trip a little easier.
You're the one that has the problem with it. If you're that upset by it, call sick and then call pro-standards or a Chief Pilot and vent your frustration. But in the end, you'll get the same answer from them all. "You're the FO. Shut your hole!".
It sounds like you're a real joy to fly with if this is ruining multi day trips for you. You losing sleep over this?
 

ASA_Aviator

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Posts
1,136
Total Time
Enough
Who really cares? 99% of the pilots out there aren't standard in some fashion. As long as the job gets done, why complain? That's unless you're the Chief Pilot/Management/Training Department type. Hell, I've even flown with IOE Captains who aren't standard outside of IOE training.
Are you one of those people who can't accept that the same results can be accomplished 1,000 different ways? Or does it have to be done 1 way and way only?
Maybe you're the one that needs to have a beer once in a while and lighten up. Quit taking this job so damn seriously.
You're the one that has the problem with it. If you're that upset by it, call sick and then call pro-standards or a Chief Pilot and vent your frustration. But in the end, you'll get the same answer from them all. "You're the FO. Shut your hole!".
It sounds like you're a real joy to fly with if this is ruining multi day trips for you. You losing sleep over this?

I find it annoying when someone is really non-standard just because I don't know what they expect, but as long as they aren't trying to kill me, it doesn't really matter. Some people get pissed if you start a flow before they call for it, and some get pissed if you wait for them to call for it. So, I just ask, "Do you want me to wait for the checklist to be called, or not," before the first leg with a new captain.

Being proactive seems to solve a lot of the problems. Just relax, and learn how to mold to what the captain wants. Someday, you'll be pissing off FOs yourself... :)
 

WayBack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Posts
1,153
Total Time
2.4
I find it annoying when someone is really non-standard just because I don't know what they expect, but as long as they aren't trying to kill me, it doesn't really matter. Some people get pissed if you start a flow before they call for it, and some get pissed if you wait for them to call for it. So, I just ask, "Do you want me to wait for the checklist to be called, or not," before the first leg with a new captain.

Being proactive seems to solve a lot of the problems. Just relax, and learn how to mold to what the captain wants. Someday, you'll be pissing off FOs yourself... :)
Exactly.
FO's need to be sharp marbles seeing that they're the low man on the totum pole, and no matter how much that captain pisses you off, for what ever reason, the FO has to learn to deal with it.
 

MALSR

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 21, 2006
Posts
301
Total Time
enough
This goes along with, "Hi, I'm easy going." When I here that I cringe and prepare myself for a long trip.
 

WayBack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Posts
1,153
Total Time
2.4
Some of the worst pilots you'll ever fly with are the most standard.
This couldn't be more true.
I will never forget this guy. He was a check airman, and an anal one at that. He tried to be perfectly standard and by the book to the point where he would miss the little things because he was too busy double checking everything (taxi checklists, atis....YES ATIS!) that he would mess up.
He messed up and messed up a lot. Taxing the plane was his biggest issue. He would move his finger along on the chart while the plane was in movement. The problem was he couldn't watch his finger and the taxiway.
In HOU he damn near pulled onto an active runway thinking it was a taxiway. I tried telling him 3 times that he turned the wrong way, finally locking the brakes up on him. We had a brief discussion.
As long as you have fuel, programmed the FMS, configured the airplane to take off and don't blow an altitude...everything else can be fixed without the FAA knowing.
 

khsgt

Token White Guy
Joined
Dec 4, 2002
Posts
222
Total Time
6000+
My usual brief was always "I don't give a F*&k what you do or how you do it, just don't hurt me, my airplane, or my ticket" Most seemed to be ok with it.......Cheers
 

pipi

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 11, 2006
Posts
71
Total Time
8000
Some of the worst pilots you'll ever fly with are the most standard.

The three pilots that almost killed me, and I mean that literally, were the three most NON STANDARD pilots I have ever flown with. Being standard is about discipline. It's about being proud about what you do and refusing to compromise and lower the bar. It's about character, about doing what you know you are supposed to do, even when nobody is watching, instead of being cocky (not proud) about what you do, and doing things your own way because you think you are better than the people that developed the SOPs.
When I fly with an FO that is standard, we don't have to second guess each other and the cockpit flows beautifully, and very efficiently.
Pilots that do not adhere to standards tend to have other things in common: they tend to do crappy walk-arounds, tend not to be very knowledgeable about systems, ATC, their radio phraseology normally suffers and tend to be somewhat unprofessional in front of passengers.
It takes as much effort to do things by the book as it takes to do them your own way. In the end, it is all about discipline, and if you don't have it to fly standard, you probably don't have it for many other things.
 

khsgt

Token White Guy
Joined
Dec 4, 2002
Posts
222
Total Time
6000+
The three pilots that almost killed me, and I mean that literally, were the three most NON STANDARD pilots I have ever flown with. Being standard is about discipline. It's about being proud about what you do and refusing to compromise and lower the bar. It's about character, about doing what you know you are supposed to do, even when nobody is watching, instead of being cocky (not proud) about what you do, and doing things your own way because you think you are better than the people that developed the SOPs.
When I fly with an FO that is standard, we don't have to second guess each other and the cockpit flows beautifully, and very efficiently.
Pilots that do not adhere to standards tend to have other things in common: they tend to do crappy walk-arounds, tend not to be very knowledgeable about systems, ATC, their radio phraseology normally suffers and tend to be somewhat unprofessional in front of passengers.
It takes as much effort to do things by the book as it takes to do them your own way. In the end, it is all about discipline, and if you don't have it to fly standard, you probably don't have it for many other things.

What REALLY scares me are the guys that spend so much time worrying about procedures and "standards" that they forget how to actually fly an airplane without the autopilot turned on.

When I was a new 121 captain, my first six months were pretty rough, 4 phone calls from the CP as I was trying to follow every letter of every law. As Jr. Reserve, I got assigned an FO shift one day with a very senior captain and he made an observation, he said "the guys that try to stay out of trouble always seem to be the ones getting into it, the guys that arn't trying to stay out of trouble ("don't give a s*&t") never seem to find it" I gave the "not giving a s&^t" attitude a try for two weeks, and I never went back. Made it all the way to IOE check airman and never got a phone call from the CP again. Get the big stuff and nobody is watching close enough to catch anything else.
 

PeanuckleCRJ

Hurrrrrrrr
Joined
Jul 21, 2004
Posts
1,684
Total Time
mucho
"Hi, I'm standard" was never the flag. The true flag was someone that mentioned something along those lines and then ended up having a napoleon complex and not being smart enough to fly standard. You typically didn't find this out the first time you met them, though. There was normally a trail of pissed off FO's and FA's that they left behind.

Then there were the guys that just didn't care.... (for some reason they were almost always smokers...). That made for a long trip trying to figure out just what book they were reading from.

Being laid back and standard is always the easiest (and certainly is possible unlike some of the morons on here seem to think)- it takes minimal brain power and you always know what to expect.
 
Last edited:

WayBack

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 28, 2004
Posts
1,153
Total Time
2.4
The three pilots that almost killed me, and I mean that literally, were the three most NON STANDARD pilots I have ever flown with. Being standard is about discipline. It's about being proud about what you do and refusing to compromise and lower the bar. It's about character, about doing what you know you are supposed to do, even when nobody is watching, instead of being cocky (not proud) about what you do, and doing things your own way because you think you are better than the people that developed the SOPs.
When I fly with an FO that is standard, we don't have to second guess each other and the cockpit flows beautifully, and very efficiently.
Pilots that do not adhere to standards tend to have other things in common: they tend to do crappy walk-arounds, tend not to be very knowledgeable about systems, ATC, their radio phraseology normally suffers and tend to be somewhat unprofessional in front of passengers.
It takes as much effort to do things by the book as it takes to do them your own way. In the end, it is all about discipline, and if you don't have it to fly standard, you probably don't have it for many other things.
You sound like a gem to hang out with.
I bet you're one of those guys with no accent what so ever, high pitch whiney voice. But once you key the mic, you talk in a deep, raspy voice with a Southern drawl. Saying "Sugar" instead of "Sierra".
I've flown with DB's like you. It's hysterical. As long as the message doesn't get mixed up in the translation, then we're all good. If you question the message, then question ATC.


And then 3 pilots almost killed you? Literally? Then it's time to wake the hell up and pay attention to what is going on around you.
 

Max Q

ಠ_ಠ
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Posts
801
Total Time
Eleven
I tend to make more mistakes when I deviate from "the book".

That's a fact.
 

CptMurf

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2005
Posts
669
Total Time
10K+
To be a true professional, you should be able to analyze yourself, find your own style, stay consistant, and watch over the guy next to you. Do that and no one will "almost kill" you. Everyone has different abilities and comfort levels. The "good" guys/gals you fly with know their own limitations.
 

JumpersAway

Cruise Bores Me.......
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Posts
1,222
Total Time
9000++
I've always been a big fan of the "lead by example" method of doing things. If you call for the required briefs, and run the required check lists, the F/O usually follows your lead and does the job, the right way, along with you. The best part is you don't have to point out your way of doing business.

You can only be as standard as you know to be. Everyone can re-read the OM/FOM and come up with something they didn't know before. They may be fine details, but everytime I read those things, I continue to learn.

The "I'm laid back" remark is absolutely the wrong one to make. It's like you're seeking approval, or trying to cross sell the fact that you are really a laxidazical @$$ in the airplane. Don't tell me you are laid back- just do your job so it's easier to do mine................
 

LazyLightnin'

Banned
Well-known member
Joined
Feb 28, 2009
Posts
1,019
Total Time
.
I hate your briefs. I'll nod my head and pretend I give a sh|t but I'm really thinking, it's an RJ not a 76, we all fly a hundred legs a month, and this job really isn't that difficult, only mind-numbing when I have to listen your pointless briefs.

I don't care if your super standard or if you have a pound of hash in your flight case, just try not to be a total doosh.
 
Top