Flight Engineers...

PHX767

it's a dry heat
Joined
Dec 2, 2001
Posts
349
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3:45pm
TonyC said:
Several other -135 variants had no boom operator, and no flight engineer. I was still using a slipstick when "booms" were using HP calculators to accomplish the Form F. :)



In fact... I wonder what one of these would bring on e-bay. ;)






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Tony,
I'd be glad to make you a good deal on my "Load Adjuster."

I don't envy you your RC experience - no Boomer and TWO Navs!! The co had to be the hardest working guy on the plane!

Then again, I have official time in an RC-135 as a Boomer. Do you know which model?
 

PHX767

it's a dry heat
Joined
Dec 2, 2001
Posts
349
Total Time
3:45pm
TonyC said:
Nope. You got me there. :)


It was an RC-135T we borrowed from the 55SRW back in '79. Used it for receiver A/R pilot training for our KC-135 ART special ops mission, and of course transition practice. We used the normal full crew for receiver practice, and if we just flew it around the patch we had to have either a Boom or a Nav onboard to lower the gear if an emergency arose. So, the Boom usually went along for most of the pattern rides. That way we could do the Form F, get the door closed and strap the ladder down, etc that normal KC-135 crews were not accustomed to doing.

Since the wing wanted us on board as a required crewmember, after differences training our aeronautical orders were amended to reflect that we were KC/RC-135 Boom Operators. I have a whopping 7.7 hours on my form 5 in the RC-135T. :D
 

TonyC

Frederick's Happy Face
Joined
Oct 21, 2002
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PHX767 said:
It was an RC-135T we borrowed from the 55SRW back in '79. ... I have a whopping 7.7 hours on my form 5 in the RC-135T. :D
55-3121 was originally a KC-135A. Under the "Rivet Stand" program, it was modified into a KC-135R(I). Later, it was modified to become the "Rivet Jaw" KC-135T, and still later was modified to "Rivet Dandy" RC-135T. As the RC-135T, it was assigned to the 6th SRW in Eielson AFB, AK when a crew of three was executing MLS approaches on 25 Feb 85 at Valdez, Alaska. The Aircraft Commander's "Fini flight" was indeed his last. The airplane crashed into the side of a mountain and was not found until the following August.


The Aircraft Commander taught my Instrument Referesher Course just weeks before the crash.

:(






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TriStar_drvr

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 27, 2001
Posts
427
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12000+
The best part of having an engineer is that he (or she) does all the aircraft walk-arounds. I really felt sorry for the engineer one night in Bismark, ND when the temp was around 30 below and the wind was blowing about 20 knots, so I offered to... lend him my hat and gloves. ;)
 

STL717

CL-215 Lake James, NC
Joined
Jun 3, 2003
Posts
251
Total Time
lots
XTW said:
They help to keep the two guys up front from killing everybody. It's the perfect place for an "unloaded" pilot to monitor the whole operation and get the "big" picture.

X

The FE will see problems before the pilots do.

Where does Captain Kirk sit on the Starship Enterprise??
 
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