FFDO Federal Flight Deck Officer......

Spinplate

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 7, 2005
Posts
310
Total Time
3000
Can anyone shed light on a website that will give me the directions to this place in New Mexico? Thank you!

How was it?
 

WWEfan

One List
Joined
Nov 30, 2003
Posts
617
Total Time
39 yrs
I brought way too much clothes. They provide uniforms and they have a FREE laundry facility. If I could do it again I would just bring enough socks and underwear to get through half the training. Some essentials you will need are sunblock, sneakers, sunglasses and rattlesnake repellant. ;)

Have fun!
 

jackotron

Man, Myth
Joined
May 26, 2004
Posts
154
Total Time
Enough
Where are the requirements for FFDO's? Our school is considering offering an extra few credits for this training.

Jack
 

Green Banana

Request Direct Honolulu..
Joined
Dec 16, 2001
Posts
566
Tsa Ffdo

To be eligible to volunteer for and participate in the Federal Flight Deck Eligibility program you must:
  • Have a current FAA Airman's certificate.
  • Have a current Class 1 or Class 2 medical certificate.
  • Be a U.S. citizen.
Be an eligible flightcrew member flying for an eligible passenger or cargo air carrier:

  • For passenger flightcrew members, you must currently be employed by a passenger air carrier or private charter company operated under 49 CFR part 1544 (i.e. passengers are screened by TSA).
  • For cargo flightcrew members, you must currently be employed by a cargo air carrier operating aircraft with a gross takeoff weight in excess of 100,000 pounds (45,500 kilograms, or 100,309.8 lbs) and serve as a flightcrew member for aircrafts of that weight.
This link will gove you all the information you may need.

https://www.tsatesting.net/ffdo/
 

Nova

Ops Check Good
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Posts
369
Total Time
>1
jackotron said:
Where are the requirements for FFDO's? Our school is considering offering an extra few credits for this training.

Jack
How exactly do they plan on pulling that off?
 

jackotron

Man, Myth
Joined
May 26, 2004
Posts
154
Total Time
Enough
Nova said:
How exactly do they plan on pulling that off?
I'm not sure what you are saying. That was the question that I was asking. How do we pull that off? Can we pull that off? Is it even worth bothering?

Jack
 

Nova

Ops Check Good
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Posts
369
Total Time
>1
Simply put, No.

Be an eligible flightcrew member flying for an eligible passenger or cargo air carrier:
  • For passenger flightcrew members, you must currently be employed by a passenger air carrier or private charter company operated under 49 CFR part 1544 (i.e. passengers are screened by TSA).
  • For cargo flightcrew members, you must currently be employed by a cargo air carrier operating aircraft with a gross takeoff weight in excess of 100,000 pounds (45,500 kilograms, or 100,309.8 lbs) and serve as a flightcrew member for aircrafts of that weight.
 

Dumbledore

My Kids' Doormat
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Posts
113
Total Time
plenty
Okay guys, let's stop talking about the program. People who can get into it know who they are. The rest don't need to know a thing.
 

Nova

Ops Check Good
Joined
Jul 3, 2002
Posts
369
Total Time
>1
You're right. The TSA should probably block their website from everyone other than a select few. :rolleyes:
 

Occam's Razor

Risible...ALWAYS risible
Joined
Jun 28, 2005
Posts
2,551
Total Time
16K+
It's not uncommon for some colleges to grant credit for military/government programs that have been completed. Someone working on a degree program in AJ or Crim might be able to get credit for the FFDO qual. The TSOC would be a good place to start the inquiries.
 

jackotron

Man, Myth
Joined
May 26, 2004
Posts
154
Total Time
Enough
Occam's Razor said:
It's not uncommon for some colleges to grant credit for military/government programs that have been completed. Someone working on a degree program in AJ or Crim might be able to get credit for the FFDO qual. The TSOC would be a good place to start the inquiries.
Thank you.

Jack
 

FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Total Time
7,000+

FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Total Time
7,000+
Since were on the subject, here's a news story I stumbled across...called, "Hero in the Cockpit".

Bill Bonnell joined American Airlines in 1936, and that airline, like others, transported U.S. mail.

"Back in those days, the pilot or co-pilot had to hand-carry the mail from the plane to the terminal," recalled George Patten, 85, a retired American pilot and a friend of Bonnell's. "Postal regulations required that you be armed. We all had to have guns, and American had us buy little .380s."

Bonnell's pistol remained in his flight bag. His widow recalled that he had not removed the weapon in years before the day of the hijacking.

On that day, Bonnell had flown from Fort Worth to Cleveland in the morning and was preparing for the return flight. The plane was carrying almost a full load, 58 passengers, and all had been seated.

Bonnell stopped and spoke to a young mother with two small children seated at the front. He then entered the cockpit and had already locked himself, his co-pilot and the engineer inside when Kuchenmeister approached the airplane ramp.

Police said Kuchenmeister, the oldest of seven children, was a troubled youth who had stolen a pistol and persuaded his 12-year-old brother to run away from home with him. He hatched his plan to hijack a plane earlier in the day, but once at the airport, the 12-year-old declined to accompany him.

So, alone, clad in dirty denim pants and a leather jacket, Kuchenmeister left his little brother in the terminal and walked out on the tarmac. There he pushed past an airline agent and was headed up the stairs to the plane when the agent demanded his ticket.

"This is my ticket," the burly youth reportedly said, and pointed the pistol at the agent.

The agent retreated, and at the entrance to the plane, Kuchenmeister told a stewardess he needed to see the pilot. Thinking he was part of the ground crew, she opened the cockpit, where Kuchenmeister, unnoticed by the passengers, stepped into the cramped quarters, closed the door and turned the gun on Bonnell.

"I want to go to Mexico," Kuchenmeister told Bonnell and his crew. "No stops."

Bonnell and the co-pilot attempted to explain to Kuchenmeister that the plane did not have enough fuel to reach Mexico, but the youth would not be deterred.

Finally, flight engineer Bob Young told Kuchenmeister they would take off but that it was necessary to throw a switch behind Kuchenmeister before the plane could taxi.

As the hijacker turned to look for the switch, Bonnell reached into his flight bag with his left hand, removed the pistol, swung around to his right and shot Kuchenmeister. The wounded hijacker then attempted to shoot Bonnell, but his pistol misfired and Bonnell shot him again.

"I shot him in the hip," Bonnell later recalled. "He sagged a bit. I let him have it again, a little higher.

"I had a maniac on my plane. We had women and children. What the hell could a guy do?"

Kuchenmeister was taken to a hospital, and Bonnell, the only qualified American pilot in Cleveland at the time, flew the plane back to Fort Worth. In midflight, he received word from Cleveland that the hijacker was only 15 and that he had died.

When Bonnell stepped from the plane, reporters described him as ashen and shaking.

"Bill told me later that the first thing he thought about when he was reaching for the gun was that woman and her two children at the front of the plane," Jean Bonnell said. "I said, `Why didn't you shoot him in the head with the second shot?'

"Bill said, `Because I didn't want to kill him.' "
 

njcapt

Freak power candidate
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,096
Total Time
>12K
Neat story, but if anybody tries to get into MY flight deck I'm putting three into his ten ring. Hopefully, all in the same entrance wound.
 

ultrarunner

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
4,324
Total Time
10000
njcapt said:
Neat story, but if anybody tries to get into MY flight deck I'm putting three into his ten ring. Hopefully, all in the same entrance wound.

If you had the right kind of door, you wouldn't need that gun.

And I'm not sorry I won't be sitting next to you when you try to grab that weapon and it accidentially discharges.....

...but naturally not because of your lack of experience in weapon retention skills...

No thanks.
 

TheRaven

Runway Sweeper 3rd Class
Joined
Jan 18, 2003
Posts
208
Total Time
14000+
ultrarunner said:
If you had the right kind of door, you wouldn't need that gun.

And I'm not sorry I won't be sitting next to you when you try to grab that weapon and it accidentially discharges.....

...but naturally not because of your lack of experience in weapon retention skills...

No thanks.
Thinking like this is the problem....by nature, a door only works when its closed. As soon as you open it, all the security it affords you is gone. Guess where my hand goes when we are getting drinks or the FO leaves to take a leak...weapon retention and readiness for whatever happens are paramount when the door opens....someone tries to force their way past the FA with the door open they are going home in a bag (if I perceive they have intent, opportunity and ability of course). Not sure how much you can train to retain the weapon, but it is covered before they turn you loose from FTETC.

The training in Artesia is excellent, I'd highly recommend it. As far as directions, all that will be taken care of after you get approved to schedule a class.
 

FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Total Time
7,000+
ultrarunner said:
And I'm not sorry I won't be sitting next to you when you try to grab that weapon and it accidentially discharges.
Now that you mention it, the shortest arc from where the firearm is kept and the door, is occupied by the opposite pilot. By probably between 1/3 and 1/2 ratio.
 
Top