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Current and past Lear 35 drivers

TRBojet

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Joined
Jan 28, 2002
Posts
95
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6000
I recently accepted a job to fly a Lear 35a and wanted to gather any opinions about flying it. I'll be going to school in about two weeks and just wanted some info that might be unique to the airplane. Anything that you said "I wish I had known that earlier."

Thanks in advance
Tom

Oh yeah, what's there to do in Tucson? Any good golfing?
 

passion4flying

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Joined
Dec 12, 2001
Posts
118
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5000+
The 35a is a good airplane. The biggest thing I found is that on approach the plane has a tendency to display dutch roll characterics. It is easy to over-control. Sometime you might try cross-controlling a little. Great single engine characterics. Small cockpit. Other than that you pull up to make the world smaller, push down to make the world bigger and pull really hard to make the world even bigger. Just me .02 worth

Passion
 

LearjetGA

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Joined
Dec 11, 2001
Posts
61
Total Time
2700
The 35 doesn't need much fuel, climbs fast (3000 ft/min full load) has good single engine caracteristics.

Don't go below vref. Depending on which S/N you are going to fly, you will find the yaw damper doing sometimes his own stuff. Just disengage it, reengage it.

First hour fuel about 1500, then 1300, 1200, ...

Landings are very easy, compared to the 20's, the 35 has a great wing and effective spoilers. The thrust reverses, if you have Aeronca's, can be a real pain in the ... neck !!!

Crosswind landings are easy if you fly the plane into the ground. A pitch up attitude with crosswind is going to get you in trouble, i.e. AOA close to the yellow range, tip tanks close to the ground, ...

After flying the plane for two years, i think that it's a great airplane. One of htese birds that you need to have flown in your career.

Fly safe.

LearjetGA
 

Gulfstream 200

Database Expert
Joined
Jan 21, 2002
Posts
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a great airplane....no doubt.
very reliable, plenty of power, good learning experience!

Its just VERY small! like others said keep up VREF (I always liked VREF+10) dont get it slow...I never really noticed much dutch roll others talk about, maybe I was sleeping.....

Have fun, be careful, hope its a good outfit, lots of the smaller lear operators (Part 135) tend to be dirtbag operations....be safe, you will love the Learjet.
 

Old Crow

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Dec 6, 2001
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166
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10K+
Can't say enough good things about the 35A. The only two Flight Levels you'll use are 390 and 410.

The biggest problem most newbies have is adjusting to the sinsitive pitch control that begins when you level off above 27,000 feet. The air is becoming less dense and as the aircraft accelerates you literally only need to think about controlling the pitch. Any movement of the yoke will end you with a constant dinging off the altitude alerter 300 ft. low then "ding" you're 300 ft. high. then "ding" again. Just relax and say "You got it"!

That dutch role thing is simple. Only occurs on final with the yaw damp off. If it happens, simply turn in on or put it into a slip.

You'll enjoy Tucson if you like ovens... Make sure you go to the bone yard. Other than that and a few cold co-cola's you'll be in the books most of the time any way.

The Lear is a joy to fly. Take a dart and put two big ass engines on it and there you have it.

Good luck and Enjoy the ride!
 

Timebuilder

Entrepreneur
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Nov 25, 2001
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1634
Ref plus ten is nice and safe, but ref on a short final works fine....as long as you don't go below it. If you don't have reversers, you will like ref better than ref plus 10.

Figuring Vref is simple in the 35. You're landing with 4,000 lbs of fuel. Divide that in half, and think "20" instead of 2,000. You have four pax. Take "105", add the 20, and 4 (for the 4 pax). Add it all up, and your ref speed for landing is 129kts, and target speed is 139kts.

The damper is supposed to stay in until the flare, but I like to take it out just inside a 1/4 mile final, so I can slip for a crosswind. The "do-all" button on the yoke gets hit ONCE to take out the damper. After the landing rollout, slow down to a walking speed, just before you want to turn off the runway, then hit the steering lock button. Don't do this at speed, as a lot of accidents were caused by the steering taking the plane off into the grass at 90kts. Rely on the rudder only for steering until you are at taxi speed.

The reversers can be a pain. If you have the bucket type, no problem. If you have cascade reversers, you first have to raise the levers, and get them to "unlock" first, then deploy them.

Right after takeoff, start using nose down trim. Always use it in short "bursts", holding in the trim button center section and pushing the knob upward. Continuous trim application can lower the nose a little too quickly for passenger comfort.

Hopefully, that's enough to get you started.

Good luck. It's a nice ship.
 
Last edited:

TRBojet

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2002
Posts
95
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6000
Thanks

Thanks everyone for the insight. If the company gets the plane they were talking about, it has the Dee Howard TRs, so that'll be nice. I haven't heard anything good about the Aeroncas. Also, I know about the level off at high altitude; the F-28's autopilot was a piece of junk (had to play with it constantly.)

I think I'll be able to hang with this company until my furlough is over (whenever that'll be), but at least I'll get the LRJET type if they decide to close up shop.

Thanks again
Tom
 

Bill Mostellar

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Dec 5, 2001
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4,000+
SimuFlight or Flight Safety

Where will you be going to school?

I was fortunate enough to fly Lears in the USAF for 8 years (operationally and schoolhouse). Most of the great attributes have already been mentioned.

Get used to leaning your head the left if you're going to the right seat - the cockpit is a bit small.

I wish you success!
 

TRBojet

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Jan 28, 2002
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I'll be going to Flightsafety in Tucson.

It should be fun. That cockpit does look small, especially when you're 6'1".

See ya
 

temcgrew

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Jul 16, 2002
Posts
825
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3000
VREF?

hey check out www.jetreview.com for all of the lear 35 limitations, memory items, and annunciator panel. I have set it all up to memorize these three things. let me know if it helps any! or if there are any mistakes.

as for never go below Vref in a learjet. we had this long term debate at my company.(we have over 10 lears.) I have been told by folks I fly with that this is true, but when I asked someone to document it, I was told...."well, it's in THE BOOK." I was never told which book or were in whatever book he was talking about.
Also I have never been instructed to "never go below Vref" in a learjet. Ask your instructor when you go about this and he should be able to clear this up.

technique, even though it works fine for you should never be taught as absolute doctrine.

If you are going to drag a tip tank three inches over the runway, it won't be becouse you are 5 knots or so below Vref speed!!!!
 

501261

Consigliere
Joined
May 27, 2002
Posts
829
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-
Tucson's a great place to go to school, beats the hell out of Wichita. Nice relaxed atmosphere.

As far as good eats in Tucson, I really like Chuy's Mesquite Broiler, and if you like a Tappan Yaki table there’s a really good one on the East side of town called Sakura, lots of memorabilia on the wall. There's a bunch of restaurants on the East side of town, if you can find you're way to Hooter's you'll probably drive by most of them.

You'll probably be staying at one of the airport hotels. They're OK, but they're not really that close to FS (you have to drive all the way around the airport). I'd recommend staying at the Marriott University- much better "scenery (UA coeds)" to look at and not that much further to drive.

You'll really enjoy flying the Lear, especially with a nice job to eventually go back to. Don't worry too much about the small cockpit, I'm 6'3" and I once had a 6'5" copilot. We'd just take the Jepps and seat cushions out and be fine. That's the big hint for big guys, the seat cushions are Velcro’d in, making them easy to take out, and taking the Jepps out from behind the seat gives you about 3 more inches of leg room!
 

BlondAmbition

Active member
Joined
Mar 16, 2002
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29
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6,500
Dear TURBojet,

With many years of flying Lears, I can recommend bringing 1 essential item-a small towell. You will use it for 2 things:

1) Wiping the sweat off from throwing bags over the seats and sitting in the cockpit doing flows and the like.

2) Wiping off the windscreen when you descend into a humid environment after 2.5 hours of being cold soaked.

It's a fun plane. I had my last flight in one in July. Glad to see it go, but I will always remember it fondly.

Don't forget your towel!

BA
 

rice

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Feb 10, 2002
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I'm 6'3" 235 lbs and it was a pretty tight fit. But its throwing the bags thats really a pain. Good Luck!! It's a fun ride.

Rice :cool:
 

temcgrew

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Jul 16, 2002
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the towel is a great idea, if your going to the southeast(florida) its a good idea to turn the windshield heat on right after takeoff!! but, you will still need the towel, ATC seems to think that all learjets can make it from FL350 to 10,000 ft in about 50 miles!!
I am 6'3 and can handle most flights up to 2.5 hours.
 

servicemonkey

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Nov 26, 2001
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>5000
Have fun. For me, flying the Lear is, at times, one of those "wow-they actually pay me to do this" deals.
Two things:
1.Don't get slow.
2.The fuel system WILL bite you if you let yourself get distracted while moving fuel around. Also, make sure the fuel panel is secure on shut down. Embarassing to get a call at the hotel from the FBO telling you that your plane is sitting on one of its tip tanks.
Best regards,
sm
 

F/O

Smells like....
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Mar 7, 2002
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Tom

I don't have that much time in the plane, but I know you are coming from the -300 so here are a couple of things you will notice.

First, you will realize how spoiled you were by the room in the Fokker and the Boeing. As others have mentioned, the Lear has an extremely small and I think downright uncomfortable cockpit. My seat sits all the way against the bulkhead and there's still nowhere near the legroom you have in a Boeing. Rudder pedals don't adjust, either.

Second, if it's hot and/or humid outside, the cockpit is a fiery furnace until about an hour after departure, and is especially bad on the ground. I don't think I've ever sweated as much as I did in the Lear on a recent trip back east. Literally soaked in sweat. The A/C works great in the back, though, so as long as you have a GPU the folks will be comfortable on the ground.

A few random observations follow. As you might expect, the Lear is quite a bit more responsive than the Boeing. It's a bit more difficult to fly SMOOTHLY. You will get used to this. You can't deploy the reversers with the nosewheel still off the ground like you can in the 737. Unless you are intentionally using aerodynamic braking to slow, you will lower the nosewheel onto the runway more positively than you do in the 737. Finally, the spoilers are controlled by a switch near the throttle quadrant. This is an "on/off" switch. You get all or nuthin'. Unlike the Boeing, it is impossible to deploy them smoothly. A pitch change and a terrific rumble will follow. You will be manually deploying them on landing. Gear and initial flap extension speeds are the same as the Fokker.

Performance is easy, and no getting spoiled by ACARS and authothrottles!! :)

Enjoy!!
 

TRBojet

Well-known member
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Jan 28, 2002
Posts
95
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6000
Thanks all! I've enjoyed reading your observations on the airplane and your ideas for eats.

Tom
 

tredding@swa

SWA F/O
Joined
Jul 1, 2002
Posts
294
Total Time
10500+
electric socks

Your feet will freeze in the winter. I used electric socks, no joke. Much better than numb toes!!

Great little plane, you will enjoy flying it, like everyone else - Vref +5-10kts will keep you out of trouble.

Golf in TUS is great, you may not have time to play - FSI will keep you very busy preping for your type ride! Good Luck!
 

FalconPilot69

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Mar 26, 2002
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Some
Cruise?

What is the typical or maybe I should say, what is the range of the Lear 35?
 

banned username 2

Banned
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Nov 25, 2001
Posts
3,254
4 hours you would typically land with 1500 lbs of fuel...

last hour burn is about 1000-1100 lbs. so TECHNICALLY as far as the FAA is concerned you will have about 1:20 of fuel left.
 
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