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CRJ Type Rating, Where can I get one?

FlyCrop

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I would like to go get a CRJ type rating while I am unemployed. Does anyone know who is giving the training for one?

Thanks
 

skydiverdriver

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Honestly, the only way I know how to get one is to obtain a job at an airline that flies them, and wait for the upgrade. Honestly, if you are thinking this will enhance your employability, I would save your money. A type without any experience, or real reason to get it would be useless. You would be better served gaining another rating, or some multi time or something.

Of course, Flightsafety does all of our training, in their sims with our instructors. Perhaps they can help you out if you have the money. Of course, these days you probably need a note from the FBI to get an air-transport type without a job and a backround check. Might be more trouble than it's worth. It may even look a bit suspicious. Perhaps you could tell us why you want it, and we can help more. Good luck.
 

FlyCrop

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CRJ Type Rating

Thanks for the input.

I am currently at ATA in Orlando. I start Specifics Class for the CRJ in March 2002. I would like to go for the Type Rating after I am done with the class and check-ride(CL-65) with ATA. I did the Specifics Class for the EMB-120 in September 2001. Since then I feel that information fading from not using it, of course. I would definately like to have the deck stacked, with a CRJ Type Rating, so that when the Regionals start hiring I have an edge/job.
 

scottm

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FlyCorp,

I would be very careful about doing this for a few reasons. Most importantly the CRJ and ERJ have a reputation for high failure rates on checkrides and type rides. They are quite a handful to fly and definetly take some time to get used to. I have flown with Captain's who have thousands of hours on it and will admit they learn something new everday(as you'll find in a lot of planes). It seems as though at our company those who do well on the rides are those who sit as FOs for a while. Obviously they get invaluable experience on the line. Many failures come from transitions where this is the first jet and glass they have flown. I can tell you this, it was my first jet and glass, I had about 1200 like you, and I busted my butt to pass the SIC portions required. To throw me in from my previous a/c into the left seat......well lets just say I would have some pink wall paper.

I would recommend putting your money to getting some multi like previously stated, picking up a CFI, II, MEI. Those are things that companys like to see. It would be better to show them your drive to fly and teach then your ability to buy yourself a type. Not to mention, the last thing you need in an interview would be a FAA failed ride. Remember, any interview you have, it is fair game to drill you on that a/c........thats a whole lot of ground that you would have to know having never flown the actual a/c.

whatever you decide, best of luck, and not to worry, hiring will be back.

Just my 2 cents.
 

jordan

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Wait...

Just wait until you get hired by a regional, let them pay to train you as a FO and then type you as a Captain. Don't waste your money. Don't hurry things because 10 to 1 you will end up in the same place as someone who waits for company-paid training.
 

FlyCrop

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Adding Ratings or Types....

You both are probably right.

As you mentioned about getting CFI, CFII, MEI, and the MEII. I am currently getting the CFI and CFII with American Flyers(great course!!). Next month I'll go up to ATP in Jacksonville for the MEI and MEII. Then I'll transition back to ATA for the CRJ class and stay afterwards to do MEI and MEII instruction with their Duchess'. Maybe I''ll put this money to work with some Embry Riddle courses.
 

SkwRJ

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I agree 100% with the previous posts regarding the CRJ type rating.

You mentioned that you would like to have it in order to give you an "edge" on the competition. Since you won't be flying the aircraft after getting your type rating, you will soon forget everything (as you mentioned above).

Let's say you get an interview at a regional. The question will come up as to why you have a type rating in an airplane you have never flown for which no one requires a type rating prior to employment. Then the questions will lead to aircraft systems (that you already forgot). Pretty soon the rating is actually hurting you instead of helping.

If you want an edge on the competition, get experience. Don't waste money on type ratings that the regionals eventually will pay for (besides, you will always still have to pass their training). These days, there are a lot of experienced pilots (ex. airline)looking for jobs and a type rating with low time will not help you out.

Take it from a guy that teaches (IOE) every day in the CRJ. Instead, get more multi and instrument time. That's what will eventually make you a competent pilot.;)
 

skydiverdriver

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Well said, skywrj. I would also add that if you showed up for a SIC check in an rj, and had a type, they might expect a bit more from you. We had some Midway guys at Comair who did really well with the training, no wonder since many were captains in the same aircraft. I don't know if this will work for you, but sometimes it pays to be dumb. I know a lot of instructors will go a lot longer to help someone new who is willing to learn, rather than help someone who tries to know too much. Anyway, why would you want to pay for training that you don't need yet? Just do the best with what you have, and the job will come. Good luck.
 

generaltso

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where does it say that because you have a type rating you have to know the systems of the aircraft? Ask a Delta 777 Captain to describe the fuel system on a DC-8, which he was typed in. Do you think he will know? I don't think he will, and I don't think he will give a **CENSORED****CENSORED****CENSORED****CENSORED**.

I think if an interviewer tried to ask questions about a plane that I hade not flown recently, I would simply say I don't remember, it has been a while since I have flown that plane and I like to put an emphasis on the systems of the plane I am currently flying (or something like that).

There are pluses and minuses to paying for a type rating. First of all, if your paying for the type, the chances are A LOT slimmer of busting then if your upgrading at an airline (but it is possible).

A type rating can prove to a potential employer that you can survive a intense training course, like the one they will put you through. Also, sometimes you can get a couple great recommendations from examiners or instructors.

With that said, if I was going to throw some money down to get a type, I would definitely say get the B-737, unless you are a lifer. The 737 will do much, much more for you in the future (if SWA continues their hiring practices).

Either way, good luck and have fun!
 

MetroSheriff

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generaltso said:
where does it say that because you have a type rating you have to know the systems of the aircraft? Ask a Delta 777 Captain to describe the fuel system on a DC-8, which he was typed in. Do you think he will know? I don't think he will, and I don't think he will give a **CENSORED****CENSORED****CENSORED****CENSORED**.

I think if an interviewer tried to ask questions about a plane that I hade not flown recently, I would simply say I don't remember, it has been a while since I have flown that plane and I like to put an emphasis on the systems of the plane I am currently flying (or something like that).


"I know I am typed in the CRJ, but I have never actually flown it, only the sim. Besides, it's been a while for me so if you don't mind, I would rather go into depth on the fuel system of the C-172RG."

Yeah, that would work real well in an interview.


I am not sure, but I don't think Delta 777 Captains go to many interviews for airlines operating CRJs.
 
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scottm

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Hey Generaltso:

Ever been to an interview? I hate to break it to ya but it is not your choice in what you will discuss and which aircraft you would like to discuss. The interviewer has full control and can take it any way he wants.

For instance, the last interview I had proves this point. I was furloughed and had flown the ERJ for 6 months prior. I also had 900 hours in a Metroliner but that was almost a year ago since I flew it. First question out of the interviewers mouth," Oh, the Metro, I've got a lot of time on those, so tell me, how much fuel is in the hopper tank when a low fuel warning light illuminates on the annunciator panel? Talk me througha V1 cut with full engine shut down procedures(memory items). I knew and focused my studies on the ERJ so trying to go back and pull those numbers out and procedures was tough but expected of me.

To re-address what Metrosheriff said, you better know your stuff on all aircraft you have flown before you go in. Anything and everything is fair game.
 

Guam360

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Metrosheriff & scottm,

well said...

Generaltso, Get a job...
 

generaltso

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my guess is some of you guys are lifers and don't know how the majors run there interviews.
 

Guam360

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so which interviews have you been to?

are you an airline pilot in diguise as a 172 pilot?
 

bobbysamd

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RJ type

I agree with the others. It's not really worth it to buy what is really an esoteric type rating. I say esoteric because the training is not commonly available to the pilot public at large and really available only to operators. You've already discovered that.

Your best chance at getting "the interview" is to offer essentially the same credentials as others offer, i.e., in a nutshell, plenty of multi PIC. You can get that as an MEI. If you can land a job flying in scheduled ops, i.e., multi freight or checks or something like that, so much the better. If you show an RJ type on your resume, it may be a negative because it could type you (sorry) as an oddball. Commuter recruiters expect a particular profile in their applicants and don't expect them to have type ratings. Something odd or different about an applicant without apparent explanation raises red flags and invites the round file (which is one reason why I regard recruiters as coneheads - they have this narrow point of view). The exception would be applicants who have types but also legitimate PIC experience in their aircraft.

A commuter might send you to an RJ immediately if it has the need. These days, though, it probably will not, so you will be assigned to the best aircraft your seniority can hold, which may be a 1900 or a Dash. It may be a few years before you can bid an RJ. By that time, you will have forgotten more than what you learned in your RJ ground school. Moreover, they want to train you their way and what you learned before might interfere with how they want to train you. That could hurt you.

In my day, many people, including myself, bought Citation type ratings. I did it because I thought it would give me an advantage if I could show I could pass a turbojet training program. Also, in those days, American Eagle was giving sim rides in a Citation sim. Well, several months after I took my type, I got an AE interview and was put in the sim. My type helped me not one iota. The sim flew completely different than the airplane. I do believe the type helped me land a couple of senior instructing jobs, but did me no good for getting commuter interviews.

Good luck with your plans.

PS-to the General: I went to five interviews or screenings eleven-twelve years ago. Nothing has changed. Take it from me, the interviewer controls the interview, not you. Don't be a wise guy; answers that you propose will accelerate your trip home. I remember my very first interview at WestAir in 1990. The Chief Pilot asked me to describe the emergency extension procedure on the Seminole. In other words, even if you have zillions of time in a 172 from several years ago, be prepared to answer questions on it.

PPS-Great suggestion below about getting a glider rating. I knew someone who got a job with Express I in Memphis or Nashville, I can't remember which, in part because of his glider rating. His interviewer was also a glider pilot, they bonded, and the rest is history.
 
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dav8or

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I got asked questions about a PC12 that I had logged 12 hours in at an interview. Luckily I knew the answers. I

f you have a type in the aircraft they could ask you some real deep question.

What are you going to do if you get a job offer from someone who flys EMB's ? And even with a type ypu will still have to go through thier trainning program and pass a check ride.

I'ld use that money to get another rating or more multi time. A glider or seaplane rating might get you further in an interview if the interviewer has an intrest in either.
 

dav8or

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I got asked questions about a PC12 that I had logged 12 hours in at an interview. Luckily I knew the answers.

If you have a type in the aircraft they could ask you some real deep question.

What are you going to do if you get a job offer from someone who flys EMB's ? And even with a type ypu will still have to go through thier trainning program and pass a check ride.

I'ld use that money to get another rating or more multi time. A glider or seaplane rating might get you further in an interview if the interviewer has an intrest in either.
 

BoxFlyr

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I am just wondering, how can someone who is unemployed even pay for a type in a crj?
 

generaltso

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I've gotten gouges from several majors (straight from the horses mouth). All of them said they would not ask you a question about an aircraft that you are not currently flying. But then again, the majors run there interviews a lot different then the regionals.

I think the best thing to do is get the gouge on the place you are going to interview with (obviously, right?). It doesn't make sense why someone would see if you remember what temperate makes the overheat light come on in a plane you flew 4 years ago. But I guess the regionals run there shows different.

I think in general the regional interview is more technical oriented while the major interview is more HR questions. But your right, I don't know anything about regional interviews, so thanks for clearing it up.
 

skyslug

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I have to say getting typed in an RJ with the amount of time you say you have, you'd be tossing your money into the wind. Save it for something useful - a type in a plane you may not fly for several years is a waste.

But to answer your question, there are places that will do it... for a hefty price, and their training is from my understanding (all 3rd hand info at this point)sub-par to what the airlines do (for free I might add!).
 
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