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C-2 gears up on live TV

UnAnswerd

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Anyone see it??? Completely uneventful landing. Pilots obviously did a great job!
 

EagleRJ

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The reporter on the helicopter that CNN was talking to said the COD pilot shut the right engine down before landing to "avoid extra damage" or something like that.

Yeah, the Navy teaches their pilots that when they have an emergency, be sure to do it big! If you're a man, you'll shut an engine down too, to give yourself that extra little challenge. :rolleyes:
 

viper548

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Yeah, what's up with the right engine being shut down? It makes a go-around a dangerous situation.
 

UnstableAviator

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EagleRJ said:
Yeah, the Navy teaches their pilots that when they have an emergency, be sure to do it big! If you're a man, you'll shut an engine down too, to give yourself that extra little challenge. :rolleyes:


For some reason, that's the first thing I've gotten a good laugh at on this board. Good one liner.

I never did understand the "save the engines" idea people have when they gear up. I've seen this before too. Let's create multiple emergencies. We'll be heroes!
 

EagleRJ

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viper548 said:
Yeah, what's up with the right engine being shut down? It makes a go-around a dangerous situation.

I know nothing about the COD, but I'll guess that the engine failed first, and a loss of hydraulics prevented the landing gear from being extended. I'm sure there's a backup system, but maybe it failed for some reason.
 

JimNtexas

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Just saw it on TV, they took the arresting cable and stopped upright, one prop still turning.

It did not look like the airframe was badly damaged, I'm sure that bird will fly again.
 

ToiletDuck

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Massey told CNN from his helicopter that the plane circled the area for hours as the crew went through emergency procedures.

The crew, he said, "went by the book to determine exactly what they were going to have to do in order to get this aircraft on the ground safely."
from www.cnn.com So somewhere in that book it says to shut it off. I'm curious as to why A) it says to kill the engine and B) it took "hours" to go through the emergency procedures.

Video is on CNN btw.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/08/15/emergency.landing/index.html
 
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Sam Snead

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I'm sure the circling was to burn off fuel, in preparation for the emergency landing.
 
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Donsa320

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ToiletDuck said:
from www.cnn.com So somewhere in that book it says to shut it off. I'm curious as to why A) it says to kill the engine and B) it took "hours" to go through the emergency procedures.

Video is on CNN btw.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/US/08/15/emergency.landing/index.html

Propellers and blades tend to go left when they separate from the engines on standard rotation installations. In the Convair 580 we recommended feathering the right engine in gear unsafe landings to protect the cabin from penetration if the props struck the pavement.

~DC
 
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Yank McCobb

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The "hours" were to burn off the fuel, as was mentioned.

I will find ZERO fault with anything this crew did. That was as good as it gets, and anyone who feels the need to criticize can only hope YOUR next gear up landing goes as smoothly and uneventful.:rolleyes:
 

EagleRJ

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Donsa320 said:
Propellers and blades tend to go left when they separate from the engines on standard rotation installations. In the Convair 580 we recommended feathering the right engine in gear unsafe landings to protect the cabin from penetration if the props struck the pavement.

~DC


I guess that makes sense. If the plane's full and you can't move passengers out of the propeller disc plane, that's probably worth the risk. I was thinking the props were composite.

On the Saab 340, the carbon fiber props are designed to shred into long filiments in the event of a gear-up landing. They aren't supposed to have any fragments detach, with the exception of the leading edge erosion cuffs (which have entered the fuselage in past accidents).
 

dhc8fo

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Just looked at the E2 NATOPS (the C2 isn't where I can get to it, but they are basically the same plane minus the hat) and it says to shut down the starboard engine at the pilot's discretion in preparation for a gera-up landing (also, the engine didn't fail, as someone posted earlier).

They dumped fuel and were circling to run the checklists, trying to troubleshoot, and to decide what was best to do. I imagine it also helped them to dump less fuel.

Regardless, they did a great job, and on live TV no less! Two LTs with probably far less flying time than many of us. I always find that amazing!
 
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