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BFR question for 121 Pilots who fly GA

LearLove

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For 121 guys that have their own plane or rent what do you do about BFRs?
Do you let your 121 recurrent count and if so do you provide documentation or just put a note in your logbook? I'm 99% sure you can do this but can't find any FAR guidance, although I have not looked too hard. Or do you do a regular BFR with an instructor?

Up until 2010 I was in a flying club where we had to have an annual review that was the same as a BFR so it was not an issue.
When the field closed due to the BRAC the club shut down and I bought a plane in 2011. My 2010 club review was good until last year then in 2012 I got a new type so I'm good until 2014.

I am currently going back to an aircraft I'm already typed in so no new type to satisfy the BFR. In 2014 can I just use my recurrent? What type of documentation do I have to keep/put in my logbook? I'm not renting anymore it’s my own aircraft. Just kind of concerned for 2 reasons:

1. legality wrt FARs
2. If something happens I don't want AVEMCO to be like "hey you didn't have a BFR so no $ dollars for you".


Thanks
 

embpic1

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A PC or PT at your 121 carrier basically counts as a BFR. Actually the way it is worded is that a BFR is not required with a PC or PT.

Sec. 61.56 — Flight review.

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (f) of this section, a flight review consists of a minimum of 1 hour of flight training and 1 hour of ground training. The review must include: (1) A review of the current general operating and flight rules of part 91 of this chapter; and
(2) A review of those maneuvers and procedures that, at the discretion of the person giving the review, are necessary for the pilot to demonstrate the safe exercise of the privileges of the pilot certificate.
(b) Glider pilots may substitute a minimum of three instructional flights in a glider, each of which includes a flight to traffic pattern altitude, in lieu of the 1 hour of flight training required in paragraph (a) of this section.
(c) Except as provided in paragraphs (d), (e), and (g) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of an aircraft unless, since the beginning of the 24th calendar month before the month in which that pilot acts as pilot in command, that person has—
(1) Accomplished a flight review given in an aircraft for which that pilot is rated by an authorized instructor and
(2) A logbook endorsed from an authorized instructor who gave the review certifying that the person has satisfactorily completed the review.
(d) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, passed a pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Force, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.
(e) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, satisfactorily accomplished one or more phases of an FAA-sponsored pilot proficiency award program need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.
(f) A person who holds a flight instructor certificate and who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, satisfactorily completed a renewal of a flight instructor certificate under the provisions in §61.197 need not accomplish the one hour of ground training specified in paragraph (a) of this section.
(g) A student pilot need not accomplish the flight review required by this section provided the student pilot is undergoing training for a certificate and has a current solo flight endorsement as required under §61.87 of this part.
(h) The requirements of this section may be accomplished in combination with the requirements of §61.57 and other applicable recent experience requirements at the discretion of the authorized instructor conducting the flight review.
(i) A flight simulator or flight training device may be used to meet the flight review requirements of this section subject to the following conditions:
(1) The flight simulator or flight training device must be used in accordance with an approved course conducted by a training center certificated under part 142 of this chapter.
(2) Unless the flight review is undertaken in a flight simulator that is approved for landings, the applicant must meet the takeoff and landing requirements of §61.57(a) or §61.57(b) of this part.
(3) The flight simulator or flight training device used must represent an aircraft or set of aircraft for which the pilot is rated.
 

GhettoBeechjet

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FAR 61.56 d.
(d) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, passed a pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Force, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.

Your company should have a copy of your training records. Make a note in your logbook if it makes you feel better or if your really concerned ask for a copy of your PC paperwork.
 

LearLove

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FAR 61.56 d.
(d) A person who has, within the period specified in paragraph (c) of this section, passed a pilot proficiency check conducted by an examiner, an approved pilot check airman, or a U.S. Armed Force, for a pilot certificate, rating, or operating privilege need not accomplish the flight review required by this section.

Your company should have a copy of your training records. Make a note in your logbook if it makes you feel better or if your really concerned ask for a copy of your PC paperwork.

Thanks to the 2 guys above. Yeah I did find the 61.56 part d but should have worded my question better. I was looking to see what guys did for documentation and the info that Beechjet provided in the second paragraph is what I was thinking.

Thanks
 
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Bringupthebird

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61.56 i1 refers to an FAR 142 simulator training center. Are all airline simulators covered under this FAR? Does AQP training qualify if it's not considered a Proficiency Check, but given another name?
 

Bad-Andy

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Lear,

An even easier, less murky way to do it is through the Wings program. You can get credit for your re-qual checkride. Go on the website and submit it -- picking any current CFI (that is part of the Wings program) to validate it. It will cover all of the requirements for one level. Print out the certificate. At the bottom of the cert (or on page 2) there will be a "mini-certificate" and an FAA BFR sign-off to put in the back of the logbook. Voila, instant BFR with no worries about having to "prove" it to the insurance vultures.

Andy
 

SVA_402

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I know a lot of airline guys that fly small airplanes. Nobody keeps documentation, because if needed, they could get it from their company.

I would also say that you could just ask your insurance company if the airline recurrent counts for them. Perhaps the fine print says it wont. But for legality purposes, you're all set. Don't waste your time with a wings program or BFR if you don't need to. Not that more training ever hurts though.
 

slaquer5

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Since you are all so sharp quick question


What position reporting procedure is needed when operating in the vicinity of Washington SFRA?

A) Position report every 5 minutes
B) PR. Must be made when crossing the compullsory reporting point?
C). While within the SFRA, no position reports are required


Thanks. :)
 

slaquer5

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The answer is you do not need to . Thanks I cant delete last post or i would.
 

flyboyike

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Since you are all so sharp quick question


What position reporting procedure is needed when operating in the vicinity of Washington SFRA?

A) Position report every 5 minutes
B) PR. Must be made when crossing the compullsory reporting point?
C). While within the SFRA, no position reports are required


Thanks. :)

I would just avoid the SFRA altogether.
 

Tarquinn

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Just get a BFR...show the starry eyed 300hr cfi how it's done.

Then the starry eyed CFI will have a great story about some arrogant airline pilot who got b!tch slapped by a 172. :laugh:
 

PSL

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A pilot who doesn't recognize they could be killed in any mechanized vehicle demonstrates ignorance or arrogance (some days I honestly don't know which is worse). I am still active in GA and consider myself fortunate to be able share what I have learned. Often times, I end up learning more about GA flying from the students and I will bet my experience is not all that odd.

20+ years ago I was flying a B-727 for my paycheck and CFI (ing) on my days off because I was bored and golf season was still weeks away.

A rather precocious and arrogant CFI walked in with a pilot (55 yr old) that was having a difficult time getting checked out in a C-182, specifically the landings. To hear the CFI tell the story, the man flew well (really good was his exact words) but couldn't land. He flared high, as was reported, every time.

Well, I couldn't believe that was the full story and when I offered to help, the man graciously agreed. I asked to see his pilot certificate and you guessed it ... he was an airline driver (B-747 CA with NWA). We chatted on the way to the airplane and he felt horrible and was genuinely embarrassed by his performance. The remedy was quite easy. I told him to verbalize when he wanted to flare and to wait 5 full seconds before he adjusted the pitch for the flare. He greased it on the next three times.

When we returned to the flight school the CFI asked me how it went. I said, 'GREAT'. Really, he replied, how were the landings ? 'GREAT', I said and asked him did he bother to talk to the man and asked him what he did for a living. Because if you had, you would have realized he was flaring normally for his work airplane and needed a little guidance with the sight picture and he would be fine.

I offer this only to highlight that aviation is often a two way street.

I sit down with a DPE once a year for a chat about the goings on in GA. They along with the CFIs who are actively serving are a great resource to stay safe and legal.

So while a Flight Review is not required for FAR 121 pilots, I think the ground review is well worth the time and cost of lunch.
 
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Twisted Mind

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I bring my copy of my last PC into the FSDO and the inspector gives me a wings program certificate. I send that to the insurance company and they are happy.
 

Rekks Inbound

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Even more fun than that is watching an experienced pilot try an R/C plane:D


Oh, yea! So much broken balsa and plywood. Watched a guy smash a JR 10X on the ground after a 5 second destruction flight (Top Flight P-51/Supertigre .90), he was so frustrated. Stalked off the field swearing.

What a waste of good R/C equipment.

Sad.

Peace.

Rekks
 
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