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America's Deadliest Jobs

heywatchthis

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I doubt that is just professional pilots that fly for a living. I'm sure that includes all the weekend pilots, non-instrument current pilots, and the typical guys that say "yea I'm a pilot too, I got my pilot license".

I have lost a few buddies since my career started but few were from a 121/135/91k flight.
 

CMI

folgers from a tube sock
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ATP
I doubt that is just professional pilots that fly for a living. I'm sure that includes all the weekend pilots, non-instrument current pilots, and the typical guys that say "yea I'm a pilot too, I got my pilot license".

I have lost a few buddies since my career started but few were from a 121/135/91k flight.

I would disagree with your assessment, and world view of the situation. I can think of a lot of dead pilots in just 2009. FedEx MD-11 121 N526FE, A Lear 60 in SC 135, Colgan in NY 121 N200WQ. Those were only the one's that made the news. I also think that figure includes 135 Helicopter Ops, like Air Med Flights. And don’t forget about flight instructing. Just think a little harder and you will see a deadly profession.
 

kingaira90

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Those were Department of Labor statistics for people who died on the job, by definition I doubt they include GA weekend pilots.

Despite the relative safety of air travel, being a professional pilot has been the deadliest (1920's, 1930's time frame) or one of the deadliest professions since it began.
 

bizjet800

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Those were Department of Labor statistics for people who died on the job, by definition I doubt they include GA weekend pilots.

Despite the relative safety of air travel, being a professional pilot has been the deadliest (1920's, 1930's time frame) or one of the deadliest professions since it began.

Do the statistics really support this? I mean when you factor in the amount of hours/miles flown? I think we are way safer than in the 1920/30s.

We lose some 40,000+ people on our highways each year! Still the most dangerous part of the job is driving to the airport.
 

kingaira90

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Do the statistics really support this? I mean when you factor in the amount of hours/miles flown? I think we are way safer than in the 1920/30s.

We lose some 40,000+ people on our highways each year! Still the most dangerous part of the job is driving to the airport.


Those aren't statistics based on number of pilot deaths per revenue seat mile or something just total deaths. Absolutely much safer now then it was in the early days of aviation. Still one of the deadliest jobs though.

In the early airmail days etc there was probably a 50% plus mortality rate for the guys who stayed in it. Nothing close to that now.

Kinda hard to die behind a desk, we will always be at the top of those statistics until the robots take over ;-)

-kingaira90
 

Gulfstream 200

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Deadly profession??...yeah, keep telling yourself that.

You would have a far greater chance of dying in a car crash if you had a M-F office job and drove in 20 days a month.

But hey, whatever justifies that "living on the edge" feeling, Maverick.

;)

Never came close to dying by pushing the envelope or racing F-14s on my motorcycle....but I did forget my Cipro once on a 4 night Mumbai trip....now that there's a dangerous aspect of this "deadly" profession.
 

Secret Squirrel

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some
2/3's of those deaths are 135 operators in Alaska. I lost a lot of friends up there in my 10 years.
 

Frozen Ronin

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After last week, Squirrel, not sure I'll make it to 10 years. Pulled the fire truck outta the barn twice this last week for mx issues. At least I made it somewhere that had a fire truck....
 

svcta

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Guys, it's simple numbers and they are not open to interpretation outside of the fact that there are sectors of professional aviation that are more dangerous than others. My take on that is this: who knows where I'll end up working over the course of my career. I've already instructed, towed banners, flown cargo in Central America, worked for an airline, and now I'm corporate.. . . I hope to stay where I am, but who knows. We all get around.

These stats on the table in front of us are in terms of deaths per 100K workers. If more pilots per 100K pilots died last year than did Wal-Mart employees then we simply work in a more potentially lethal industry than they do.
 

pilotyip

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What does this have to do with pay?

And people think we get paid too much!

"Ninety aircraft pilots died in crashes and other accidents."

http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/career-articles-america_s_deadliest_jobs-961
The public does not care what a pilot is paid, they only care about how much a tickets costs and for advance purchase will switch airlines for a $1 in fare difference. Adam Smith had it all figured out in 1780. At the present pay there is no shortage of people wanting to do this deadly job, unlike being a member of an EOD team on the police force.
 
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