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Airtran ALPA MEC supports the Midwest pilots

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FlyWolf

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2002
Posts
798
Just wanted to say "Thank you" to all Airtran pilots for your support to the Midwest pilots. A true class act group of professional pilots.

From the Midwest MEC:

Far and away the most concrete support we received came from our brothers and sisters at AirTran. MEC Chairman First Officer Linden Hillman informed me that the AirTran MEC not only passed a resolution of support, but they have also received a
cid:image003.jpg@01CA5990.76B33860
commitment from their management to offer preferential interviews at AirTran for our furloughed pilots.
 
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Just wanted to say "Thank you" to all Airtran pilots for your support to the Midwest pilots. A true class act group of professional pilots.

From the Midwest MEC:

Far and away the most concrete support we received came from our brothers and sisters at AirTran. MEC Chairman First Officer Linden Hillman informed me that the AirTran MEC not only passed a resolution of support, but they have also received a
cid:image003.jpg@01CA5990.76B33860
commitment from their management to offer preferential interviews at AirTran for our furloughed pilots.

So will the give you DOH integration on their list or is it just another form of stapler?
 
Hey I'm sorry our pay is less than you make now but we are working on it.

Our management team ARE As$holes and hide behind religion to clear their conscience of the lives they destroy.

The company makes the rules so they can fault the pilots and avoid a lawsuit.

I can't quit my job out of protest for how you are being treated without losing my car, house, and family.

We have some pricks flying for us too, tell me a company that doesn't.

I know that the day will come when I'm in the same place you are thru no fault of my own.

I will try to make you feel as welcome as I can, I have limited
influence in how this company is run but that doesn't mean I don't understand you plight.
 
Just wanted to say "Thank you" to all Airtran pilots for your support to the Midwest pilots. A true class act group of professional pilots.

From the Midwest MEC:

Far and away the most concrete support we received came from our brothers and sisters at AirTran. MEC Chairman First Officer Linden Hillman informed me that the AirTran MEC not only passed a resolution of support, but they have also received a
cid:image003.jpg@01CA5990.76B33860
commitment from their management to offer preferential interviews at AirTran for our furloughed pilots.

How generous of them, and how greatful of you. This is truely a class act that they are offering you a job with seat and pay protections. When are the class dates gonna start?

Is this the same PDT Linden that we use to call George Jefferson?
 
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Quit complaing and get your app in since it's SO much better over there.


I pity the day when what's happening to these guys ends up happening to you. Maybe there will be a long line of guys standing by their keyboards waiting to post some smarta$$ comments directed your way.
I can only imagine what they're going through right now in their own personal lives and now would be a good time to keep such comments to yourself and let them deal with it.
Guys and gals of Midwest, may you find another job soon.
 
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More than 90 Southwest Airlines employees arrive on a chartered Southwest Airlines jet Saturday at Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee and are escorted to the gate by a group of Milwaukee Harley-Davidson Motorcycle riders. Discount carrier Southwest Airlines begins flying here Sunday.

Passengers can expect more efficient aircraft, lower fares

By Tom Daykin of the Journal Sentinel
Posted: Oct. 31, 2009
Seat facts
With Midwest Airlines taking its Boeing 717 jets out of service, the carrier's widest seats are disappearing. Here is a comparison of seat width and pitch - the distance from any point on one seat to the same point on the seat in front or behind it - for Midwest Airlines, AirTran Airways and Southwest Airlines. Dimensions vary based on type of aircraft and class of service.
• Midwest: Seat width, 17.8 to 20 inches; pitch, 30 to 38 inches, on Embraer 170, Embraer 190 and Airbus 319 jets. Seat width, 17.3 inches; pitch, 31 inches on Embraer 135 and Embraer 140 regional jets.
• AirTran: Seat width, 18 to 22 inches; pitch, 30 to 37 inches, on Boeing 717 and Boeing 737 jets.
• Southwest: Seat width, 17 inches; pitch, 32 inches, on Boeing 737 jets.





Starting this week, air service from Mitchell International Airport undergoes some big changes:
•  Discount carrier Southwest Airlines begins flying here Sunday morning, a move that industry experts say has already lowered fares in Milwaukee.
•  On Monday night, the last Midwest Airlines flight using a Boeing 717 jet, featuring Midwest's legacy pilots and flight attendants, will land at Mitchell International. Midwest's new owner, Republic Airways Holdings Inc., is replacing them with more-efficient aircraft - primarily the 99-seat Embraer 190, as well as the 136-seat Airbus 319 - and less-expensive crews, so Midwest can better compete on price and restore some service that had been cut last year.
•  Discount carrier AirTran Airways, meanwhile, has become Milwaukee's second-busiest carrier, and Delta Air Lines is continuing to merge its operations with the former No. 2 carrier, Northwest Airlines, which Delta bought a year ago.
Gone will be the wide leather seats that were long Midwest Airlines' hallmark.
For years, Midwest touted its wider seats as a big advantage over other airlines. Last year, Midwest began charging extra for the 21.5-inch wide seats in the front rows of the Boeing 717s.
The Embraer and Airbus jets replacing the Boeing 717s have seat widths ranging from 17.8 inches to 20 inches.
That disappoints longtime Midwest customer Susan Foley, who twice this year took Midwest flights from Milwaukee to Phoenix, and then flew Southwest from Phoenix to San Diego, where her brother lives.
Recently, Foley booked Southwest flights from Milwaukee to Kansas City, and Kansas City to San Diego, because she was unable to get a wide seat on Midwest. Her roundtrip fare: $280. "I would have spent more than that to fly on the old Midwest jets," Foley said.
Seat width, however, is not a major factor for most passengers, said aviation consultant Scott Hamilton, of Issaquah, Wash.-based Leeham Co.
"The general public cares about low fares, on time, no lost luggage and landing in one piece," Hamilton said.
 
Pace of changes

Airlines often come in and out of markets, says Robert Herbst, an industry consultant who operates AirlineFinancials.com. But the recent pace of changes seems high for a medium-sized airport like Milwaukee's, he said.
"Certainly, it's getting hit at least at the top of the range," Herbst said.
That's good news for local passengers seeking low fares and more destinations.
Fares for flights departing from Milwaukee this fall have dropped 20% compared with fall 2008, according to Kayak.com. Flights booked through Orbitz.com departing from Milwaukee between the day after Labor Day and the Sunday before Thanksgiving are 21% cheaper than they were during the same period last year.
That trend will continue. Travelocity.com says the average airfare for a Milwaukee departure from November through March will be 30% less than the national average.
Herbst expects Southwest will eventually raise its fares but will keep them among the lowest in Milwaukee.
Southwest begins its Milwaukee service with 12 daily nonstop flights to Baltimore, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Orlando and Tampa, Fla.
Its arrival in the market already has helped force lower fares from Milwaukee, according to data from Travelocity.com and other online booking services. Also, Southwest, unlike many airlines, doesn't charge for the first two pieces of checked luggage for each passenger. That could amount to a savings of up to $80 for a round trip, said Kevin Krone, Southwest's vice president of marketing, sales and distribution.
Krone says Southwest's fares will attract new passengers to Mitchell International, including some from the northern Chicago suburbs.
Additional service driven by AirTran's lower fares helped Mitchell International record its busiest month ever in September, with a total of 648,779 passengers - a 16.85% increase over September 2008.
 

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