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Age 65

pilotgolfer

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What was the date, this bill went into effect ?


For Immediate Release

December 14, 2007

FAA Statement on Pilot Retirement Age


The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) welcomes the legislation signed into law last night by the President that allows U.S. commercial pilots to fly until age 65. The determined efforts of Congress have averted a lengthy federal rulemaking process while enabling some of our nation’s most experienced pilots to keep flying.
Effective last night, the Fair Treatment for Experienced Pilots Act allows both pilots on a domestic flight to be up to age 65. For international flights, one pilot may be up to age 65 provided the other pilot is under age 60, consistent with the November 2006 International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standard.
While the law is not retroactive, airlines do have the option to rehire pilots who are under age 65. The rehiring of pilots is not mandatory and is the decision of each airline.
In January, the FAA announced that it would raise the retirement age for commercial pilots to 65. The mandatory federal rulemaking process would have taken 18 months to two years. The FAA took a renewed look at its longstanding rule in September 2006 with the help of aviation industry and medical experts who provided the agency with valuable insight and analysis. The “Age 60 Rule” had been in effect since 1959.
 

Grandpa +65

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Yeah! December 14, 2007 and you will see a lot`s oldies bailing out as soon as they turned 62 1/2.
 

Truckdriver

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In June we will have the oldest of the geezers hitting 62 1/2. I think we might see about half of the over 60 crowd hang it up when they get to that point, so maybe the number will start ticking up this summer as we continue the countdown to Dec 2012 when age 65 ends and the Mayan calendar says the world will come to an end.
 

sayrejm

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In June we will have the oldest of the geezers hitting 62 1/2. I think we might see about half of the over 60 crowd hang it up when they get to that point, so maybe the number will start ticking up this summer as we continue the countdown to Dec 2012 when age 65 ends and the Mayan calendar says the world will come to an end.

Holy Crap! I never crossed those two together!! How did I miss that one??? This means there will be a pilot shortage when the world ends! Hahahahahahaha...... damn.
 

waveflyer

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Posted 11-03-2009 01:27- 1261...Days to Go

2012, huh? 2012....according to Hollywood Mayans, the end of the world happens in 2012 ... I'd say that it's pretty successful management to have the next major airline hiring boom occur during the end times.

I wonder who'll fly the light twin that rescues John Cusack after ALL THAT HIRING....

sorry fellas... I'm quick, I know... All those synapses connected by a good liberal education.
 

PHXFLYR

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Yeah! December 14, 2007 and you will see a lot`s oldies bailing out as soon as they turned 62 1/2.

That's what everyone is saying now. My bet is once they reach 62 1/2 the thinking will then become "well...I made it this far...whats another 2 and a half years ??? "; especially if they can still pass the physicals and checkrides. Hard to walk away from that kinda of scratch ...just watch.

PHXFLYR:cool:
 
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rjpilot7667

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That's what everyone is saying now. My bet is once they reach 62 1/2 the thinking will then become "well...I made it this far...whats another 2 and a half years ??? "; especially if they can still pass the physicals and checkrides. Hard to walk away from that kinda of scratch ...just watch.

PHXFLYR:cool:

I agree, I am a corporate pilot for a very large company. One of the pilots is 68 years old and won't leave. I am quite tired of babysitting. The company is scared to fire him for fear he will sue over age discrimination.

This year he will fly 200 hrs and makes very good money (Twice as much as me) , so why would he leave; he already is is retired.

I have flown with him for nearly 10 years and have been a good FO. When I was promoted to Captain he had an issue with flying as my FO on a trip around the world, the worst part being he went to my boss instead of coming to me. He did not take a pay cut and regarless who's name was on the paperwork the experience level was the same in the cockpit. Prior to this, I called this man a friend. Now I think he is a giant headed ego-maniac with rapidly deteriorating skills and I mean rapidly. Like an old boxer who won't bow out gracefully and suffers a 1 punch KO.

The only thing you can do is not support them. Stop making them look good and fly the airplane so you don't take the violation that belongs to them.

This is also a lesson for us; don't depend on pensions, save what ever you can, don't live out of your means and please, get out of the cockpit at 60!
 

SEVEN

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I agree, I am a corporate pilot for a very large company. One of the pilots is 68 years old and won't leave. I am quite tired of babysitting. The company is scared to fire him for fear he will sue over age discrimination.

This year he will fly 200 hrs and makes very good money (Twice as much as me) , so why would he leave; he already is is retired.

I have flown with him for nearly 10 years and have been a good FO. When I was promoted to Captain he had an issue with flying as my FO on a trip around the world, the worst part being he went to my boss instead of coming to me. He did not take a pay cut and regarless who's name was on the paperwork the experience level was the same in the cockpit. Prior to this, I called this man a friend. Now I think he is a giant headed ego-maniac with rapidly deteriorating skills and I mean rapidly. Like an old boxer who won't bow out gracefully and suffers a 1 punch KO.

The only thing you can do is not support them. Stop making them look good and fly the airplane so you don't take the violation that belongs to them.

This is also a lesson for us; don't depend on pensions, save what ever you can, don't live out of your means and please, get out of the cockpit at 60!

Well said.
 

RP170

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I agree, I am a corporate pilot for a very large company. One of the pilots is 68 years old and won't leave. I am quite tired of babysitting. The company is scared to fire him for fear he will sue over age discrimination.

This year he will fly 200 hrs and makes very good money (Twice as much as me) , so why would he leave; he already is is retired.

I have flown with him for nearly 10 years and have been a good FO. When I was promoted to Captain he had an issue with flying as my FO on a trip around the world, the worst part being he went to my boss instead of coming to me. He did not take a pay cut and regarless who's name was on the paperwork the experience level was the same in the cockpit. Prior to this, I called this man a friend. Now I think he is a giant headed ego-maniac with rapidly deteriorating skills and I mean rapidly. Like an old boxer who won't bow out gracefully and suffers a 1 punch KO.

The only thing you can do is not support them. Stop making them look good and fly the airplane so you don't take the violation that belongs to them.

This is also a lesson for us; don't depend on pensions, save what ever you can, don't live out of your means and please, get out of the cockpit at 60!

Another reason why the age 65 rule needs to be applied to Part 135/91/91K. We still have about 300 at NetJets over age 60 (some over 70!!!) even after the 200 that took the early buyout. Many (not all) of these guys can't pull their own weight as far as loading bags, staying awake in the cockpit, etc that fractional flying demands. Guess who does all the work then? Pretty frustrating considering 495 of us (myself included) are hitting the street in January. I personally feel a line needs to be drawn somewhere in the best interest of safety.
 
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BILL LUMBERG

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I agree, I am a corporate pilot for a very large company. One of the pilots is 68 years old and won't leave. I am quite tired of babysitting. The company is scared to fire him for fear he will sue over age discrimination.

This year he will fly 200 hrs and makes very good money (Twice as much as me) , so why would he leave; he already is is retired.

I have flown with him for nearly 10 years and have been a good FO. When I was promoted to Captain he had an issue with flying as my FO on a trip around the world, the worst part being he went to my boss instead of coming to me. He did not take a pay cut and regarless who's name was on the paperwork the experience level was the same in the cockpit. Prior to this, I called this man a friend. Now I think he is a giant headed ego-maniac with rapidly deteriorating skills and I mean rapidly. Like an old boxer who won't bow out gracefully and suffers a 1 punch KO.

The only thing you can do is not support them. Stop making them look good and fly the airplane so you don't take the violation that belongs to them.

This is also a lesson for us; don't depend on pensions, save what ever you can, don't live out of your means and please, get out of the cockpit at 60!

You an always drop a dime on him to the anonymous FAA safety hotline. You don't have to provide a name.
 

C-150ETOPS

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You an always drop a dime on him to the anonymous FAA safety hotline. You don't have to provide a name.

Well let me tell you what happens in real life even if you got a FAA Inspector interested enough to follow it up.

Even if the issue was pursued to it's extreme end and the FAA guy sat in a SIM session, the old geezer will more than likely be performing at 10 am after a good rest and a nice cup of coffee in a unfatigued condition. He will probably have had a couple of warm up sessions doing the same things for the FED the day before, and the FED is more than likely a non-current crappy jet pilot who probably would make a fool of himself if he asks anything other than "when's lunch, or what color is the sky?"

After that, it's back to flying with the unrespectful young "whippersnapper" and further demonstration that a 14 hour duty day until 3 am generally proves that 90% of the geezers are worthless.

Except for the FED, that was my life with 3 geezers in Lears 20 years ago. REF minus 15-20 in a LR-25D at 100' and a 40 Degree bank is a fugly place to be. (and yes, the word Go Around is too complicated to process too)

Cue in the geezer chant "I have youngsters falling asleep too!!!!"
 

gutshotdraw

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Another reason why the age 65 rule needs to be applied to Part 135/91/91K. We still have about 300 at NetJets over age 60 (some over 70!!!) even after the 200 that took the early buyout. Many (not all) of these guys can't pull their own weight as far as loading bags, staying awake in the cockpit, etc that fractional flying demands. Guess who does all the work then? Pretty frustrating considering 495 of us (myself included) are hitting the street in January. I personally feel a line needs to be drawn somewhere in the best interest of safety.

Ding! Winner, Winner. Chicken dinner!

It would actually be quite simple: change Part 61. No 1st or 2nd Class medicals issued to anyone that has reached their 65th birthday. Hence, no compensated flying of any type past that age.

Yes, yes I know. There are guys in their 60's that run marathons and can fly the Space Shuttle and guys in their 40's you wouldn't trust with chopsticks let alone a 40 million dollar jet but the world is ruled by generalities because it has to be. You can't regulate by the exception.
 
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PsubS

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I find it enlightening to read your post in inverse order....

Yes, yes I know. There are guys in their 60's that run marathons and can fly the Space Shuttle and guys in their 40's you wouldn't trust with chopsticks let alone a 40 million dollar jet but the world is ruled by generalities because it has to be. You can't regulate by the exception.
__________________
Benford's Law of Controversy: Passion in any argument is inversely proportional to the amount of real information advanced.

It's rather typical for FI...Lot's of complaining, very little science to back up your viewpoint.
 

gutshotdraw

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Actually, there is plenty of science on age-related cognitive skill degradation. And I'm not complaining since my career hasn't been directly impacted in a negative way by the age regulations. I'm only stating my opinion as is everyone else on this board.
 

filejw

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Another reason why the age 65 rule needs to be applied to Part 135/91/91K. We still have about 300 at NetJets over age 60 (some over 70!!!) even after the 200 that took the early buyout. Many (not all) of these guys can't pull their own weight as far as loading bags, staying awake in the cockpit, etc that fractional flying demands. Guess who does all the work then? Pretty frustrating considering 495 of us (myself included) are hitting the street in January. I personally feel a line needs to be drawn somewhere in the best interest of safety.

Careful what you ask for. Two of the late 40's guys Im flying with on this 13 day trip were pulling zzz at 2 hrs after T/O...and they are good guys too. Except you are supposed to say some thing first....

wrong quote....sorry
 
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