AA 757 may be getting winglets

aa73

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Some handy tips for flying to Europe



[size=+1]Winglets on 757s would let American increase overseas flights
[/size]

[size=-1]10:26 PM CDT on Thursday, July 7, 2005 [/size]

[size=-1]By ERIC TORBENSON / The Dallas Morning News [/size]

American Airlines Inc., seeking to accelerate its expansion of international flying, appears to be close to buying winglets for its Boeing 757s that would allow the planes to fly from New York to Europe.

The winglets – small, nearly vertical airfoils installed at the wingtips to reduce drag – would give American 757-200s as much as 200 extra miles of range and save 150,000 gallons of fuel per plane each year.

Staff Graphic


That could help American shift some of the mix of its flying from domestic routes, where it faces stiff competition from low-cost carriers, to overseas flights, which are more lucrative because average fares are higher.

Fort Worth-based American, the world's largest carrier, already uses its 757s to fly from Boston to Manchester, England, and to Shannon, Ireland, and has been pleased with the results.

American is definitely looking at buying winglets for its 757s, said Tim Wagner, an airline spokesman. "We haven't made a decision yet," he said. "We're looking to maximize our aircraft capabilities."

Aviation Partners Boeing has been working with American officials for four years, said Dick Friel, senior vice president of marketing for the Seattle firm that sells the kits.

"I think we're getting pretty close" with American, he said.

The carrier has shopped for winglets on its fleet of 77 Boeing 737-800s, but the interest of late has been for winglets on some or all of its 143 Boeing 757-200s. "We're eager to get something done with them," Mr. Friel said.



Pilots' approval


The word about the likely changes has spread through American's pilots' union. While unable to comment on the potential change, Allied Pilots Association New York domicile chairman Sam Mayer said his pilots would welcome the new aircraft.

"Any additional flying that goes anywhere is a good thing," he said. Rumors about the winglets have been rampant, and the pilots are eager to hear about the potential changes, he said. "It's good to see the trend line reversing."

The modified planes are likely to be flown from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, where American has invested millions of dollars in terminal upgrades.



Countering Continental


That would put American in competition for European travelers in the world's top air market with Houston-based Continental Airlines Inc., which has an international hub at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey.

Continental is the launch customer for the 757 winglets, technology that was approved only last month by regulators.

Continental has added 11 international routes so far this year, including seven from Newark. Four Newark routes are being flown by 757s, spokesman David Messing said.

One analyst applauded American's likely move.

"People want to fly directly instead of connecting to Europe," said Roger King of Credit Sights in New York. The 757 aircraft would help American fly the plane to smaller European markets. But Continental provides formidable competition from Newark, he noted.

With crude oil prices over $60 per barrel, fuel-saving winglets are increasingly popular. Dallas-based Southwest Airlines Co. uses them on its Boeing 737s.
 

Spooky 1

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Press release

aa73 said:
Some handy tips for flying to Europe



[size=+1]Winglets on 757s would let American increase overseas flights
[/size]

[size=-1]10:26 PM CDT on Thursday, July 7, 2005 [/size]

[size=-1]By ERIC TORBENSON / The Dallas Morning News [/size]

American Airlines Inc., seeking to accelerate its expansion of international flying, appears to be close to buying winglets for its Boeing 757s that would allow the planes to fly from New York to Europe.

The winglets – small, nearly vertical airfoils installed at the wingtips to reduce drag – would give American 757-200s as much as 200 extra miles of range and save 150,000 gallons of fuel per plane each year.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/img/07-05/0708winglet.jpg Staff Graphic


That could help American shift some of the mix of its flying from domestic routes, where it faces stiff competition from low-cost carriers, to overseas flights, which are more lucrative because average fares are higher.

Fort Worth-based American, the world's largest carrier, already uses its 757s to fly from Boston to Manchester, England, and to Shannon, Ireland, and has been pleased with the results.

American is definitely looking at buying winglets for its 757s, said Tim Wagner, an airline spokesman. "We haven't made a decision yet," he said. "We're looking to maximize our aircraft capabilities."

Aviation Partners Boeing has been working with American officials for four years, said Dick Friel, senior vice president of marketing for the Seattle firm that sells the kits.

"I think we're getting pretty close" with American, he said.

The carrier has shopped for winglets on its fleet of 77 Boeing 737-800s, but the interest of late has been for winglets on some or all of its 143 Boeing 757-200s. "We're eager to get something done with them," Mr. Friel said.



Pilots' approval


The word about the likely changes has spread through American's pilots' union. While unable to comment on the potential change, Allied Pilots Association New York domicile chairman Sam Mayer said his pilots would welcome the new aircraft.

"Any additional flying that goes anywhere is a good thing," he said. Rumors about the winglets have been rampant, and the pilots are eager to hear about the potential changes, he said. "It's good to see the trend line reversing."

The modified planes are likely to be flown from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport, where American has invested millions of dollars in terminal upgrades.



Countering Continental


That would put American in competition for European travelers in the world's top air market with Houston-based Continental Airlines Inc., which has an international hub at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey.

Continental is the launch customer for the 757 winglets, technology that was approved only last month by regulators.

Continental has added 11 international routes so far this year, including seven from Newark. Four Newark routes are being flown by 757s, spokesman David Messing said.

One analyst applauded American's likely move.

"People want to fly directly instead of connecting to Europe," said Roger King of Credit Sights in New York. The 757 aircraft would help American fly the plane to smaller European markets. But Continental provides formidable competition from Newark, he noted.

With crude oil prices over $60 per barrel, fuel-saving winglets are increasingly popular. Dallas-based Southwest Airlines Co. uses them on its Boeing 737s.
Sounds like a press release directly from AeroPartners
 

PHX767

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Oh, NOW it's a good idea

I remember a guy asking if winglets were a good idea to save fuel on ask and answer (on AApilots.com) back in like 2001, 2002 - the answer from flight ops engineering was that "winglets are mostly cosmetic" or some such drivel. Too bad we can't look up past answers any more....
 

aa73

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PHX767 said:
I remember a guy asking if winglets were a good idea to save fuel on ask and answer (on AApilots.com) back in like 2001, 2002 - the answer from flight ops engineering was that "winglets are mostly cosmetic" or some such drivel. Too bad we can't look up past answers any more....
Kinda makes you wonder why A&A was axed, huh? Those troublesome know-it-all pilots!
 

bafanguy

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DL had winglets on a couple of the 727's as a test. I can't say for sure, but I seem to remember something about Boeing not standing behind any after-market mods so DL dropped the idea. There may have been some MTC issues also...too long ago to remember everything about it. Looked nice, though.
 

onlybiff

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Now, I know you guys will be all over me for not having a link to the article, but a printout is sitting right in front of me. Anyway, the claims from the manufacturer are a typical savings of 150,000 gallons of gas per aircraft per year. a 200NM range increase and they are working on getting it certified to take off 14,000lbs heavier.......next on the list for Aviation Partners to do list are winglets for the 737-600, 737-900, and the 767-300ER.

Looks great on paper anyway, and CAL's 757's that already have them look pretty sharp too..

Biff
 

Rick James

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Any pictures of a 757 with winglets? I've never seen them before on a 75.
 
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