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Wow, Real F-15 T/O?

JimNtexas

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This is shear speculation on my part, based on my experience in the archaic F-4 and F-111 airplanes:

They are probably demonstrating a "tactical departure", in which the two airplanes make hard turns away from each other just after takeoff so as to immediately get into a tactical formation, which involves around a mile of separation.

Well, it was a mile in the F-4 anyway, I don't know what they use in the Ego Jet. Ten miles maybe since it's based on keeping as far apart as the wingman can have good visual on the lead.

The wingman there is just "shining his a**" a bit, note the leader is not in such a steep bank. They are both climbing so he's not gong to hit the grass, he just wants to be in on the show.

Jim
 

JBHewlett

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Neat Picture

Thats pretty neat picture. I have alot of respect for guys who fly fighter jets (Well I have respect for everyone who flys jets). It takes intellect and alot of skill.

Ever wonder what the camera was thinking on that one?

J.
 

Toro

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Hopefully it's some type of airshow with extremely experienced pilots, otherwise they're hot-dogging idiots.

It's got to be somewhat of a visual perception - notice how high the grass is; from the angle the camera was at it blocks the space between the ground and the jets - but I would guess that his right wing is no more than ten feet off the ground.

JimNtexas mentioned a tactical departure. We do these in combat situations - it involves keeping the jet as low as possible until roughly the departure end of the runway in full afterburner, then pulling up to as nose high as possible as fast as possible without pi$$ing away too much airspeed. But we do those takeoffs in 20 second trail from each other (which is the same for about 99% of our normal daily takeoffs); we hardly ever do close formation takeoffs and we NEVER do them in combat. The only time we do formation takeoffs and landings is to get through the weather (or for practice).

Other than showing off, there would be absolutely no reason to check away that aggressively that low to the ground.
 

Toro

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I'm retarded...

I didn't realize there was text below the pictures - my browser only opened the picture and when I went back I scrolled down to see...viola..."A pair of 'Bitburg Eagles' make a spectacular departure during the Cambrai 'Tiger Meet' Airshow of 1986."

So that answers that question. As to a couple others-
Delta3 - A Bitburg Eagle is an Eagle (F-15C) stationed at Bitburg Air Base, Germany. Bitburg was closed in 1994 and the Eagles were moved next door to Spangdahlem AB (where they no longer reside either).
JimNTexas - We generally fly 1-2 miles tactical formation, but can easily spread it to 3-4 miles if environmentals permit. You can still see your flight lead/wingman at 10 miles under good conditions, but it usually involves you being padlocked on him to not going blind.
 

JimNtexas

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Toro said:
JimNtexas mentioned a tactical departure. We do these in combat situations - it involves keeping the jet as low as possible until roughly the departure end of the runway in full afterburner, then pulling up to as nose high as possible as fast as possible without pi$$ing away too much airspeed. But we do those takeoffs in 20 second trail from each other (which is the same for about 99% of our normal daily takeoffs); we hardly ever do close formation takeoffs and we NEVER do them in combat. ...

Well, this just shows that the younger generation has gone soft. Back before fighter pilots had lace on their underwear we did formation tactical departures that were similar to what you see in the picture. Takeoff in formation, as soon as you break ground go into left and right hard turns to get into low altitude tactical formation.

Just call me Grampa Simpson.

Jim
 

LJDRVR

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Back in the mid-1980's when I was stationed at Loring I used to watch the folks from the 5thFIS perform the formation tactical departures that JimNtexas mentions in the above post. Back then they were flying F-106's. I will never forget what a beautifull jet those darts were. No external stores, just the wing tanks. I've seen a lot of aircraft but I can honestly say the 106 was easily the best looking one of them all.
 

Toro

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Well, this just shows that the younger generation has gone soft. Back before fighter pilots had lace on their underwear we did formation tactical departures that were similar to what you see in the picture.

It's cool, I'll grant you that, but it's not tactically sound. I'm not going to get into it on this site, but there is a specific reason for doing a combat departure and doing it in close formation goes 100% against that reason.
 

Mud Eagle

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Toro said:

Other than showing off, there would be absolutely no reason to check away that aggressively that low to the ground.

When I was stationed at Nellis I saw the C models do this frequently -- this low to the dirt. So, as of 1998 at least, it was still part of the Weapons School syllabus -- which leads me to believe that it's still part of the F-15C 3-3.
 
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