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Workers deserve a choice

pilotyip

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From the WSJ. One of the under-appreciated fault lines in the U.S. economy is between the 22 "right-to-work" states and the rest of the country. The former have tended to do much better economically. Now some non-right-to-work states such as Indiana, Wisconsin and Michigan are thinking about joining this club that allows workers to opt-out of union membership.

Contrary to much union rhetoric, right-to-work laws don't ban or bust unions. They simply grant individual workers the right to join or not to join, even once a workplace is organized by a union. Workers who decline to join the union can't be forced to have dues taken out of their paycheck and thus used to finance union political campaigns. Most right-to-work states are in the South and West, and only Oklahoma has adopted this freedom to choose in the last 20 years.

Right-to-work states outperform forced-union states in almost every measurable category of worker well-being. A new study in the Cato Journal by economist Richard Vedder finds that from 2000 to 2008 some 4.7 million Americans moved from forced-union to right-to-work states.

The study also found that from 1977 through 2007 there was "a very strong and highly statistically significant relationship between right-to-work laws and economic growth." Right-to-work states experienced a 23% faster rise in per capita income over that period. The two regions that have lost the most jobs in recent years, the once-industrial Northeast and Midwest, are mostly forced-union states.

Indiana is a case study in the negative effects of forced unionism. Governor Mitch Daniels recently explained why his state lost a bid for a new Colgate factory that would have employed hundreds: "We did absolutely everything we could do. . . . We made an offer we believe was competitive in every other respect, but they [Colgate] want to be in a right-to-work state."

Mr. Daniels adds that the lack of a right-to-work law "does hold us back economically. There is no doubt about it." He estimates that when competing with Southern states for businesses, "a very large number—perhaps as many as a quarter—of the deals we don't get a shot at are for just this reason."

This damage has motivated Indiana Republicans, who now control both legislature chambers, to announce that they want to pass a right-to-work law. Unions immediately went to Defcon 1, Democrats are up in arms, and Republicans could yet buckle under this union pressure. Even Mr. Daniels, who has stood up to union opposition in the past, seems hesitant. He told the Indianapolis Star that right to work "may be worth a look," but he added it "is not on my agenda." He's worried that the issue so antagonizes unions that it could derail the rest of his legislative agenda.

We hope Republicans don't flinch. Right-to-work laws make states more economically competitive, but the bigger issue is about individual rights. Workers should have the right to join a union but also the right not to. Indiana and other states with new Republican majorities have a rare opportunity to pass a major reform that will reduce union power, help to attract new jobs, and liberate workers from union coercion.
 

pilotyip

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G4dude

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you must be in management.

Why do you feel he must be in management? There are many pilots who agree with the information and conclusions of the CATO report. I am one of them.
 

acpilot

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Fact are facts. Right-to-Work is better for everyone (because it's better for business).
 

acpilot

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You're wrong. Child slave labor is bad for the child. Did you really just equate right-to-work to slavery?
 

CA1900

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My point is that not everything that's better for business is necessarily better for everyone. That's all. Child labor laws, pollution controls, minimum wage -- these are all things that are not "good for business," but are still worth having. That was my point.
 

acpilot

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Letting people work for companies and with groups they are not forced to join is good for everyone.
 

acpilot

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Unions started because working conditions were unsafe. They are safe now and we have OSHA to "protect" us. Unions have become businesses interested only in members' dues. The modern unions serve no prupose but to reduce the number of dollars employees take home to their families.
 

Flyer2000

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The FAA says that a pilot must have a minimum rest period of 8 hours (reduced) in a 24 hour period. The airlines routinely operate 16 hour duty periods, with 8 hours of rest begining from when the aircraft parking brake is set, and ending when 30 minutes (roughly) from when the parking brake will be released. OSHA has no say in the matter, and the ATA, and RAA lobby the FAA to keep the status quo. Granted the following day is limited in scope of duty to 14 hours because of a mandatory compensatory rest of 10 hours, but that 14 hours is based on 8 hours of rest, which in reality was probably closer to 6 hours of actual sleep at best. Unions on the other hand have been arguing for better rest rules, requiring an actual "behind the door" period, as opposed to current FAR (ambiguous).

Not sure OSHA is protecting pilots on all things safety related.....
 

acpilot

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I've flown night freight and understand exactly how hard it can be on a pilot. I've never crashed a plane and would have called in sick if I thought my rest (or lack thereof) would have been a problem.

I'm not sure the union* is doing much to actually help you. Are they still accepting your dues?

*Some have said it's not really a union, it's a association. Which is it?
 

skypine69

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Get rid of unions (by way of not requiring membership) and watch how fast companies change things to screw the employees. You dont like the way your union treats you? Get involved and make a difference!
 

acpilot

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Get rid of the unions and enjoy and increased quality of life.
 

WayBack

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Unions on the other hand have been arguing for better rest rules, requiring an actual "behind the door" period, as opposed to current FAR (ambiguous).

Not sure OSHA is protecting pilots on all things safety related.....
They've been "arguing" since the 1960's for better rest rules, looks like we're still going by the FAA Standard. The only reason rest rules are getting looked at closely now, is because of the Colgan crash. If that crew hadn't said what they did on the CVR, the rest rules would have never came to light like they had.....and that's because the FAA is taking the heat, it isn't because of ALPA.

Get rid of unions (by way of not requiring membership) and watch how fast companies change things to screw the employees. You dont like the way your union treats you? Get involved and make a difference!
I worked for a non union airline, it was a hell of a lot better place to work for than any ALPA carrier I worked for. We had better work rules, got a long with management.
Unions are a thing of the past. Now they're nothing but a political entity.
 

cynic

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Do the labor laws in Germany support Unions?

How is the German economy doing? Did unions impact their success (or lack of it)?

Discuss... or revert to hyperbole and conjuncture.

It will probably be the latter.
 

pilotyip

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Do the labor laws in Germany support Unions?

How is the German economy doing? Did unions impact their success (or lack of it)?

Discuss... or revert to hyperbole and conjuncture.

It will probably be the latter.
Don't have the details, but the DOL in Germany has some sort of veto power over union contracts if they do not resutl in an increase in productivity as a result of the contract. A pay rasie without an increase in productioj per worker would not pass, sounds liek a good idea, no more 5 people to change a light bulb at a UAW plant.
 

skypine69

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I worked for a non union airline, it was a hell of a lot better place to work for than any ALPA carrier I worked for. We had better work rules, got a long with management.
Unions are a thing of the past. Now they're nothing but a political entity.
And get rid of the threat of bringing that union on the property and watch what happens. Unions are not the answer to everything, but they are a check on the corporations and help to keep a balance.
 
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