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Whos familiar with working with electricity?

gkrangers

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Give me five topics that should be included in the training for any employees involved in working with electricity. Give a one or two-sentence explanation of each, if you are so inclined. ;)

Seriously, I'm prepared to weed through the sarcastic replies for one or two good ones. :D
 

FN FAL

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gkrangers said:
Give me five topics that should be included in the training for any employees involved in working with electricity. Give a one or two-sentence explanation of each, if you are so inclined. ;)

Seriously, I'm prepared to weed through the sarcastic replies for one or two good ones. :D
Lock out/Tag out procedures.

At one paper mill that I worked at, mechanics had misread the schematic for one of the paper machines that was being worked on. They used their pad locks and lock out devices to isolate the wrong circuit. While a contractor was up inside the paper machine, someone started it or "jogged" it and this guy lost part of both legs.

I always tested the start buttons after locking and tagging a machine out, just to make sure.

Hope that helps.
 

gkrangers

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FN FAL said:
Lock out/Tag out procedures.

At one paper mill that I worked at, mechanics had misread the schematic for one of the paper machines that was being worked on. They used their pad locks and lock out devices to isolate the wrong circuit. While a contractor was up inside the paper machine, someone started it or "jogged" it and this guy lost part of both legs.

I always tested the start buttons after locking and tagging a machine out, just to make sure.

Hope that helps.
So they use "padlocks" to isolate part of the power grid inside the mill, just to isolate that specific machine?
 

FN FAL

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gkrangers said:
So they use "padlocks" to isolate part of the power grid inside the mill, just to isolate that specific machine?
Usually to isolate one machine or a production line. The padlocks and tags went on the handle of a main panel that secured power to a machine.

Here's anohter one for you. At the Fort Howard paper mill in Green Bay, some guy was drilling into a wall for one reason or another and he went through the wall and right into some heavy duty power lines. Don't gig me on the exact voltage, but I believe that according to the news story, that it was in the 13,000 volt range. This could have been high tension feed into the building from their own plant or public service. I never worked with anything bigger than typical three phase or two phase and DC, so don't knock me on the exact voltage, but it was up there. And yes, I do know it's the amperage that kills...but the guy with the drill drew enough amps to be killed.
 
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dseagrav

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threve
* THE COMMANDMENTS OF THE SACRED SOCIETY OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS *

1: Beware of lightning that lurketh in an uncharged condenser lest it cause thee to bounce upon thy buttocks in a most embarrassing manner.
2: Cause thou the switch that supplieth large quantities of juice to be opened and thusly tagged, that thy days may be long in this earthly vale of tears.
3: Prove to thyself that all circuits that radiateth, and upon which the worketh, are grounded and thusly tagged lest they lift thee to a radio frequency potential and causeth thee to make like a radiator too.
4: Tarry thou not amongst these fools that engage in intentional shocks for they are not long for this world and are surely unbelievers.
5: Take care that thou useth the proper method when thou takest the measures of high-voltage circuits too, that thou dost not incinerate both thee and thy test meter, for verily, though thou has no company property number and can be easily surveyed, the test meter has one and, as a consequence, bringeth much woe unto a purchasing agent.
6: Take care that thou tamperest not with interlocks and safety devices, for this incurreth the wrath of the chief electrician and bring the fury of the engineers on his head.
7: Work thou not on energized equipment for if thou doest so, thy friends will surely be buying beers for thy widow and consoling her in certain ways not generally acceptable to thee.
8: Verily, verily I say unto thee, never service equipment alone, for electrical cooking is a slow process and thou might sizzle in thy own fat upon a hot circuit for hours on end before thy maker sees fit to end thy misery and drag thee into his fold.
9: Trifle thee not with radioactive tubes and substances lest thou commence to glow in the dark like a lightning bug, and thy wife be frustrated and have not further use for thee except for thy wages.
10: Commit thou to memory all the words of the prophets which are written down in thy Bible which is the National Electrical Code, and giveth out with the straight dope and consoleth thee when thou hast suffered a ream job by the chief electrician.
11: When thou muckest about with a device in an unthinking and/or unknowing manner, thou shalt keep one hand in thy pocket. Better that thou shouldest keep both hands in thy pockets than experimentally determine the electrical potential of an innocent-seeming device.
 
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FN FAL

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gkrangers said:
So they use "padlocks" to isolate part of the power grid inside the mill, just to isolate that specific machine?
You'll see next to most production machinery, a large grey cabinet or several cabinets with pull down handles. The lock out/tag out goes on the handle after you pull down the handle to secure power. This keeps someone from coming along and lifting the handle and powering the cabinet, alowing current to flow and the machine to start.

This is a big deal...Companies have policy and procedure on this type of thing. I'm sure that in most companies, that electicians have to do the lock out/tag out. I worked as both a production employee and a field service tech and I did the lock out tag out on my own.

Testing the machine by attempting to start it was one way to ensure that you had read the schematic correctly when you locked out/tagged out, using a multimeter was another way.

In most production facilities, they don't let the new guy do this. Mostly machine operators and people from the "trades" or "millwrights"...it's part of their training.

Also, if a machine operator locked out the machine and a "trades person" came by to help, they would add their padlock to the lockout device. That way the operator could take their stuff off and go home, but the trades person was still protected because he put his own padlock on the machine.

I'll bet if did a google search on lock out/tag out procedures, you'll find quite a few websites from industry contributors. That should give you "cite-able" material for your project.
 
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sqwkvfr

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gkrangers said:
Give me five topics that should be included in the training for any employees involved in working with electricity.
What kind of electricity? Auto/industrial wiring, power lines, houses, etc.? My stepdad works for the DoE and I've picked up a few things from him....otherwise I could just direct your Qs to him.

Here's a few right off the top of my head:
-Never wear rings, watches, or any other metal jewelry.
-Wear cotton clothing (in case of a burn, it won't melt to your skin)
-Never depend on another person to cut the electricity to whatever you're repairing or modifying....check and check again.

He actually works on crews that maintain lines while they're still hot, so -as you can imagine- safety is jobs 1-10. I'd be happy to ask him for ya.
 

gkrangers

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FN FAL said:
You'll see next to most production machinery, a large grey cabinet or several cabinets with pull down handles. The lock out/tag out goes on the handle after you pull down the handle to secure power. This keeps someone from coming along and lifting the handle and powering the cabinet, alowing current to flow and the machine to start.

This is a big deal...Companies have policy and procedure on this type of thing. I'm sure that in most companies, that electicians have to do the lock out/tag out. I worked as both a production employee and a field service tech and I did the lock out tag out on my own.

Testing the machine by attempting to start it was one way to ensure that you had read the schematic correctly when you locked out/tagged out, using a multimeter was another way.

In most production facilities, they don't let the new guy do this. Mostly machine operators and people from the "trades" or "millwrights"...it's part of their training.

Also, if a machine operator locked out the machine and a "trades person" came by to help, they would add their padlock to the lockout device. That way the operator could take their stuff off and go home, but the trades person was still protected because he put his own padlock on the machine.

I'll bet if did a google search on lock out/tag out procedures, you'll find quite a few websites from industry contributors. That should give you "cite-able" material for your project.
Its a paragraph homework assignment due in a month (all the assignments are posted online already..so im just doing them now cuz i have nohting better to do.)

I was just planning on citing "FN FAL". :D

Thanks for the info.
 

FN FAL

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sqwkvfr said:
What kind of electricity? Auto/industrial wiring, power lines, houses, etc.? My stepdad works for the DoE and I've picked up a few things from him....otherwise I could just direct your Qs to him.

Here's a few right off the top of my head:
-Never wear rings, watches, or any other metal jewelry.
-Wear cotton clothing (in case of a burn, it won't melt to your skin)
-Never depend on another person to cut the electricity to whatever you're repairing or modifying....check and check again.

He actually works on crews that maintain lines while they're still hot, so -as you can imagine- safety is jobs 1-10. I'd be happy to ask him for ya.
there you go..."current" information from someone who is certified. Sounds like a good source.

My dad's neighbor is a welder on a DOD project...one of those accelerator race track thingies...those guys have to know their stuff.
 

FN FAL

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gkrangers said:
Its a paragraph homework assignment due in a month (all the assignments are posted online already..so im just doing them now cuz i have nohting better to do.)

I was just planning on citing "FN FAL". :D

Thanks for the info.
:D .... please don't "cite" me...I claim the 5th.
 

gkrangers

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FN FAL said:
:D .... please don't "cite" me...I claim the 5th.
" I'd like to quote a friend of mine, a Caravan pilot, experienced skydiver, and apparently he worked at a paper mill at one point..for a real life situation of what not to do..."

Thanks for the suggestions...I'll compile something out of this.

I'll link the prof to the thread..flightinfo.com...best source in the world.
 

FN FAL

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gkrangers said:
" I'd like to quote a friend of mine, a Caravan pilot, experienced skydiver, and apparently he worked at a paper mill at one point..for a real life situation of what not to do..."

Thanks for the suggestions...I'll compile something out of this.

I'll link the prof to the thread..flightinfo.com...best source in the world.
:) The rules may have changed, but "lock out/tag out" has probably remained pretty close to the same.
 

NuGuy

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Classic scene from the movie "Running Scared"

Hero car is pursuing bad guys down an "L" tunnel in Chicago

"Try not to brush the 3rd rail"

"Why not?"

"It's got 50,000 volts in it"

"Its not the volts that get you, its the amps...how many amps?"

"Enough to push a F$#@ING TRAIN"

Nu
 

JediNein

No One Special at all
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I learned this one early:

Your coworker asks you to hold these two bare wires while he fiddles with a switch. Do you assist your cowirker?

(See Rule #4 above)

Fly SAFE!
Jedi Nein
 

EagleRJ

Are we there yet?
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Scene from 'Spies Like Us'

Dan Ackroyd- "Hold these wires together, and whatever you do, don't let go! You are the connection!"

Chevy Chase- "B-B-B-But...."



Some other rules of thumb:

-Don't confuse Milliwatts with Megawatts

-A charged capacitor demands respect

-Your life depends on following safety procedures gleaned somewhere other than Flightinfo:eek:
 

FN FAL

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EagleRJ said:
A charged capacitor demands respect
Discharge a tv screen (tube) without that respect, lose some meat from the hand.
 
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