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What is RNP-5 and RNP-10?

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lumax

Well-known member
Joined
May 5, 2002
Posts
206
I've flown RNP approaches but I am not familiar with these terms. From what I could find on the web, RNP-5 and RNP-10 are used for en-route separation on oceanic routes.
Can anyone shed more light on this?
Do you have a good source for more info?

Thanks
 
Here's more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Required_Navigation_Performance

The performance required to fly an RNP route is generally specified in nautical miles, e.g. RNP 4 which implies that the total system error will be no greater than 4 NM for 95% of the time. The RNP specification requires that if the error exceeds or is likely to exceed twice the specified value (i.e. 8NM for RNP 4) then an alert must be generated. Since the deviation is likely to exceed the alerting deviation before the error can be rectified, route spacing must be sufficient to ensure that two aircraft deviating to the alert level toward one another will remain safely separated. RNP 4 thus supports 30 NM lateral or longitudinal spacing.
 
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I got a CPDLC response recently when I requested a climb that went something like this, "Unable, B77W 25 miles ahead." Had to look up the W to see that it stood for RNP 10.
 
I've flown RNP approaches but I am not familiar with these terms. From what I could find on the web, RNP-5 and RNP-10 are used for en-route separation on oceanic routes.
Can anyone shed more light on this?
Do you have a good source for more info?

Thanks

Search RNP on the FAA's web site.
 
Required Navigation Performance. The number indicated that 95% of the time you have to be with in x miles of course.
 
We're down to RNP .03 for approaches and are working on .01. RNP 5 and RNP 10 are only en route standards of position accuracy. If you have dual GPS, you should be able to comply with both standards with an LOA. Most of Europe now requires RNP 5 for en route nav.
 
I got a CPDLC response recently when I requested a climb that went something like this, "Unable, B77W 25 miles ahead." Had to look up the W to see that it stood for RNP 10.

I've not had the pleasure of the CPDLC system, but I assume that you are no longer required to make HF position reports if you have the CPDLC capability?
 

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