• NC Software is proud to announce the release of APDL - Airline Pilot Logbook version 10.0. Click here to view APDL on the Apple App store and install now.
  • Logbook Pro for Apple iOS version 8.1 is now available on the App Store. Major update including signature endorsements and dark/light theme support. Click here to install now.

What is a spin like??

oilcanbland

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
84
Total Time
400
Just curious. What are they like? Quite a rush?

I am flying 152s and my instructor said that he will probably demonstrate a spin for me sometime shortly. I've done a few stalls, but no spins yet.
 

StarChecker

Warp this...
Joined
Apr 16, 2002
Posts
481
Total Time
Enough
COOOOOOOL!

If anything...it makes you feel more comfortable in a small airplane. You get to see how much they can really take. At least that was my experience. I know they used to be part of Private Pilot training waaay back when. There's quite a debate as to whether they should be again. I did them as part of CFI training. I don't know if I would have enjoyed them as much during my Private training.

Wait 'til you're a CFI and your student does it for you....lotsa fun.
 

turning2

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 14, 2001
Posts
160
Total Time
5000+
In Canada it was a requirment for the private license just a few years ago. I'll never forget the first time I had to go practice them solo, :rolleyes: freaked me right out... but as the poster above said once I recovered from it I felt alot more comfortable with the aircraft and just what it would recover from... almost by itself. :D Spiral dives however were only to be attemped with a CFI on board. Odd. :confused: Like I said this was a few years ago, not too sure if its still the same.
 

Eagleflip

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
794
Total Time
5000+
While Avbug and I disagree on this topic, I firmly believe that spins should be part of the private pilot syllabus. One cannot understand the rather impressive physical sensations and visual "rush" that accompanies a spin unless they have actually seen one in the air. What's a spin feel like? You're gonna be VERY IMPRESSED! IMHO, no amount of verbal instruction and simple stall recoveries adequately prepare someone for a spin.

Were spins to be included in the required FAA syllabus, would the training accident rate increase as a result? Maybe, but we could address that issue with increased CFI training. Are aircraft certified for multi-turn spins? Nope, but hey--why not simply teach spin entrys or half-turn spins? They would introduce the entry characteristics adequately. "But spins can't necessarily be limited to half a turn!" some would say. Hogwash--aviation cadets were trained for years to recover from spins after exactly one turn, two turns, or even on a specific heading. Don't tell me it can't be done safely.

Would the subsequent number of stall/spin accidents during non-instructional flying also decrease as a result of dedicated spin training? Dunno for sure, but I'd venture to say yes. The stored knowledge of how quickly a spin can develop is well worth it's weight in gold when doing such foolish things as cross-controlling during a final turn or pulling a bit too hard on the yoke during climbout. It has kept me safe thus far--knock on wood!

Let the verbal sparring begin!
 

Timebuilder

Entrepreneur
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
4,625
Total Time
1634
First, spins are an aerobatic manuever. The only time that parachutes are not required for this particular aerobatic manuever is when a CFI is receiving spin training. I think you'd have trouble convincing the FAA that your private pilot student is working toward his CFI, and is simply thinking "long term".

They are very cool to do, and a real confidence builder. If you are not in CFI training, go to someone who teaches aerobatics, put on the 'chute and do an hour or two of unusual attitudes and spins. You will feel much more confident about your flying.
 

avbug

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 14, 2001
Posts
7,602
Total Time
n/a
Eagleflip,

We don't disagree all that much; I believe spin recognition and training should be part of the typical private pilot curriculum. However, I believe that instructors should be competent spinners before teaching it. Most instructors have done a few token spins to check a box for their instructor certificate. Take a poll and find out how many are comfortable demonstrating cross controlled entries, and each type of spin. You'll find that most instructors are terrified of spins.

If a spin is exciting, or stresses are encountered during the spin, it's being done wrong, and taught wrong.

What does a spin feel like? Marriage, after the second year.
 

Joseph II

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 11, 2002
Posts
120
Total Time
2.8e2
Well, you get the airplane just about stalling, then kick in hard rudder and yank back!

The most interesting sensation comes in the transition from straight & level to the spin. It feels like you are falling but twisting at the same time. When we did it, it slowly started to roll and quickly started to pitch down.

Once the nose is pointed towards the earth, the roll rate starts to increase rapidly. The first time you see this, it's a little scarry but it strangely feels like you are in straight & level flight. I would say the transition from S&L was more unnerving then seeing the earth spinning in front of you.

Recovery (In a 152) happens almost instantly when the rudder is used, and you will find yourself in a steep dive. Your airspeed goes nuts and you have to be careful not to pitch up to quickly. I added power on recovery too early, and got the rpm's above redline for a second (oops). The biggest sensation you will feel is the G forces. This sensation also was more uncomfortable for me then the spin itself.

After you get into a sufficient climb and your airspeed starts to decay, you add power. That's it!

The best thing about doing spins is that I was verry afraid of stalls. As soon as I did the spin, I had the confidence of knowing I could get out of a stall, and a spin if need be. I'm a lot safer because of it!

Joe
 

FL000

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,577
Total Time
1500
If I'm not mistaken, spins were at one time part of PPL training. More were dying in fatal spin training accidents than in real life spins, so they cut it out and went to stall recognition and avoidance. After all, no stall, no spin. Maybe an old timer around here can back me up on that, or refute it.
 

bobbysamd

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
5,710
Total Time
4565
Spins

I agree, the nose pointing at the ground with it turning before your very eyes is unnerving. But, it is good training. Cross-control stalls are also good training. I used to give cross-control stalls to my students. Accelerated stalls, too.

Your instructor is doing the right thing by you by introducing you to spins. Some major flight schools, such as FSI, incorporate spins and unusual attitudes training in their Commercial course.

I recall from my readings that spins were part of the Private training until something like the forties or fifties. Then, the FAA pulled spin training out of the Private syllabus for the reasons mentioned and went to stall awareness training.
 

tarp

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Posts
539
Total Time
Lots
Oil Can

Ever see Maple tree seeds in the fall? As kids we used to call these "helicopter" seeds - there's a seed pod at one end with a feather or backbone attached. The wind would blow and all these seeds came floating (spinning) down.

Think of yourself sitting in the seed pod and you have a pretty good idea of what a spin looks like from inside and outside.

My instructor said the feeling is like a parachute jump but you keep the airplane attached to your butt. It probably is the most agressive maneuver that a "shiney side up pilot" will feel but it is most fun and definitely is a confidence booster. Enjoy the ride - stalls will get very boring after this.
 

falcondriver

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
382
Total Time
5000
I think spin training should be part of the private pilot program. I had a student put me in a spin with full power and full flaps, he promptly let go of the controls and grabbed me and screamed like a little girl. The first problem was that I wasn't watching him close enough and the second was he grabbed my arms. The third was he was 230 lbs and six foot three and wouldn't let go of my arms, so I could recover. Its a long story leading up to how he configured the airplane with full power and full flaps. The short story is half of my hair fell out shortly there after.
Goodluck
FD
 

Tim47SIP

Serving for the USofA
Joined
Dec 5, 2001
Posts
1,157
Total Time
10,000
spins

Just ensure that your instructor tells you before he puts you in the spin. When I was getting a CFI add on, the instructor had me demonstrate a stall in a 152. Just prior to the stall he kicked the pedals, felt like we flipped over, and all I saw was earth. Scared the crap out of me. I quickly recovered (about half of a turn) and proceded to verbally abuse him. After he got done laughing, he said that one wouldn't count as we had to go around three complete turns. The second one went much better. He did admire the quick recovery though. I can laugh about it now, but it sure wasn't funny back then.:rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

empenage

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
528
Total Time
8500
I'm glad your instructor will do spin training. As a CFI all my students did spin training as part of thier PPL. My CFI students got unintentional spins whenever it was safe even under the hood! They hated me! By the time we got back on the ground not a gyro in the ship worked......come to think of it the mechanics always new when I had a CFI student.
 

bigD

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 29, 2002
Posts
2,020
Total Time
4.9e17
Spinning is most fun you can have in a plane with your pants on! And without a parachute.
 

172driver

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 4, 2002
Posts
744
Total Time
4000
Make sure the FAA doesn't see you all out there teaching spins to private applicants, good idea or not...unless you take the chute. Anyone ever jump out of a plane in a spin? Seems like it would be rather tough for the inside pilot. My 2 cents...some private students may benefit, some may have the life scared out of them and never show up for another lesson. Take their confidence level and personality into account as well as your experience level as a CFI doing spins.

Also, don't most stall/spin accidents happen at low level? Good luck recovering from a base to final spin before hitting the ground...especially if you're a 20 hr wonder that has seen a spin demonstrated once. I think you'd be better off to learn to keep the airspeed up and the ball centered which IS taught to private pilots. Anyone who accidentally spins a 152 is not doing too well to begin with.
 

RightPedal

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 7, 2002
Posts
841
Total Time
tt r2
The next thing after my tailwheel endorcement, I went looking for some aerobatic training. I found a guy with a decathlon that was more than glad to take me out and let me scare the crap out of myself. I loved it, and he sure taught me a lot. I will forever cherish it.

I'm really not sure spin training should be a part of the PPL for reasons mentioned. I do think all private, or at least commercial students should have some limited aerobatic training. Sure would be nice if flight schools would offer maybe a citabria for tailwheel transition and unusual attitude training. I owned a maule a few years afterwards, and one day I got myself into a situation where without that training, I would have busted my butt. So money well spent I say.

I LOVE TAIL DRAGGERS...MORE THAN THAT...I LOVE CROP DUSTERS...YAHOO!!!!
 
Top