Training Contracts

capnbob928s4

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Just trying to get some info. Does anyone have or know of anyone who has ever had to deal with getting out of a training contract early? Specifically with World Airways? I left before the two year contract was up and now they are pursuing me. Do these contracts stand up in court? Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
 

moxiepilot

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with 14,000 hours what did you enter a contract for flight training? was it type specific where as you receive training in type in return for your future service? i think a little more info could be helpful here
 

FN FAL

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capnbob928s4 said:
Just trying to get some info. Does anyone have or know of anyone who has ever had to deal with getting out of a training contract early? Specifically with World Airways? I left before the two year contract was up and now they are pursuing me. Do these contracts stand up in court? Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
http://caselaw.findlaw.com/data2/nebraskastatecases/sc/dec14/s00-221.pdf

Maybe there is some information in this case that will help your attorney out...you really should have an attorney review your case.
 

capnbob928s4

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This goes back to 1998. Hired at World and signed a two year note that was zeroed out at 24 months. On our first day of class, the instructor told the class that we might get fired before we ever finish because of financial problems. So, I looked and found a new job eight months later. Now, a collection agency has called and wants money. The statute of limitations may be expired but I am just trying to see if anyone has any firsthand knowledge or personal experience with this. I want to completely do my homework first. Thanks.
 

FN FAL

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capnbob928s4 said:
This goes back to 1998. Hired at World and signed a two year note that was zeroed out at 24 months. On our first day of class, the instructor told the class that we might get fired before we ever finish because of financial problems. So, I looked and found a new job eight months later. Now, a collection agency has called and wants money. The statute of limitations may be expired but I am just trying to see if anyone has any firsthand knowledge or personal experience with this. I want to completely do my homework first. Thanks.
Throw a few bucks at an attorney chief, that's going to be the only way to know for sure. If you have several people from your outfit that are in the same predicament, I'd suggest that they split the bill with you as a "class" action. Make sure you split the bill up front though...as I have been in a similar situation and was left holding the bag.

Attorneys are only expensive if you have to go to court...the initial consultation fee isn't that bad, unless it's more than what the employer's contract will make you pay.
 

vclean

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Contract law varies greatly state to state. All contracts require each party receive some benefit (consideration). Some states mandate due consideration (ie. marketable skill outside involved employer). Most commonly this is a type rating. Required training to perform your job usually does not qualify as due consideration. In some states employment or training contracts are unenforceable, as they are viewed to be forced servitude.

I am not an attorney, but I did stay at a crappy hotel last night.
 

PaulThomas

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You signed a contract agreeing to the terms. No one put a gun on your head forcing you to do so.

Be a man and pay up.
 

Flylo

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Don't do it!!

PaulThomas said:
You signed a contract agreeing to the terms. No one put a gun on your head forcing you to do so. Be a man and pay up.

Baloney!!

They told YOU they were getting ready to break their contract with you because of possible financial difficulties. All you did was CYA after they suggested it.

The collection agency is trying to run a scam on you. Have a lawyer send them a letter and tell them never to contact you again with that BS or you'll press criminal charges against them and then sue their entire a$$ off to boot.

:)

.
 

A Squared

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Flylo said:
Baloney!!

They told YOU they were getting ready to break their contract with you because of possible financial difficulties. All you did was CYA after they suggested it.

The collection agency is trying to run a scam on you. Have a lawyer send them a letter and tell them never to contact you again with that BS or you'll press criminal charges against them and then sue their entire a$$ off to boot.
Well, I'm sure it feels good to thump your chest and roar, but in reality, that's all it is. I would be very surprised if the contract in question included an obligation to employ him for any set length of time, so whether or not the company would or would not have furloughed him is irrelevant to the validity of the contract (obviously not irrelevant to his career and finacial status)
 

moxiepilot

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Sounds like an interesting situation overall. If a collection agency has the bill then they bought it from your lender thinking they could possibly make some money off of it. I agree with FN FAL to get an attorney to peruse the whole situation. AOPA could possibly help as well
 

FN FAL

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moxiepilot said:
Sounds like an interesting situation overall. If a collection agency has the bill then they bought it from your lender thinking they could possibly make some money off of it. I agree with FN FAL to get an attorney to peruse the whole situation. AOPA could possibly help as well
Attorney's cost money, but what else are you going to do? You can pay the darned thing and be over it, ignore it and have it hanging around your neck like an albatross, or hire a professional to look it over and see if you got a leg to stand on.

I don't don't know what they charge nowdays for an initial consultation, but even when I was a poorer boy than I am now, I could still afford to get in and pay a retainer when the chips were down. Had to sell a really neat Colt .38 Super Auto Government Model once to do it, but it got done.

If you have ever retained a good attorney in the past, you can usually mail em a letter accompanied with a xerox of what's ailing you and they will take a minute to look at it or have a para-legal go over it and they'll send you a bill. At least with the lawyers I have used, the big billing isn't untill you start doing court appearances and prep.

I'd never hesitate to retain a reputable law firm to handle a legal/civil matter.

Also, here's another thing to think about...lots of these things get settled by negotiation out of court. An attorney may be able to negotiate half of what you owe and save you some money, should the contract be enforceable against you.

But you won't know unless you retain a professional.
 
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