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Training at JetBlue

JetFumes

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Jan 14, 2005
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273
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Just some questions for you airbus drivers out there. I got called for a class on the 26th of Oct. Its a "conditional" offer pending fbi stuff, etc, etc. Whats the A320 training like. Is there anyway to prep before going to class. Do I really need to. How long does it take for a LGB base assignment. Anyway, for the input!
 

kaki

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When did you get the call? Did you interview on the 20th/21st of Sep.
 

Hair-on-Fire

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JetFumes said:
Just some questions for you airbus drivers out there. I got called for a class on the 26th of Oct. Its a "conditional" offer pending fbi stuff, etc, etc. Whats the A320 training like. Is there anyway to prep before going to class. Do I really need to. How long does it take for a LGB base assignment. Anyway, for the input!


You don't need to do anything before you get to class.
 

Dogwood

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JetFumes said:
Just some questions for you airbus drivers out there. I got called for a class on the 26th of Oct. Its a "conditional" offer pending fbi stuff, etc, etc. Whats the A320 training like. Is there anyway to prep before going to class. Do I really need to. How long does it take for a LGB base assignment. Anyway, for the input!

JF,

As you've heard, training is about 6 weeks, and you have plenty of time to learn what is required for the PC at the end. Don't sweat it. The info is spoon fed to you as you go. OK, the spoon is quite large the first two weeks as the info is pouring it, but it slacks of later.

System and company FOM knowledge is tested via a written, multiple choice, electronic test. Believe me you will be WELL PREPARED for this when the time comes.

I would spend the time prior to school getting your ducks in order at home, so you can concentrate on training. ie; I paid some of my bills ahead of time, arranged for someone to care for my yard while I was gone, and made sure the wife and daughter had everything they needed, etc.

If you had a cockpit panel and learned where the switches were ahead of time, that might help but not really necessary. They may still send you the Mem items and Limitations in advance. We used to have to know every limitation, but now it's been narrowed down to a handful and rounded off as well for training purposes.

Not to sound like an instructor, but here's another hint if you're interested: V1 cuts are very easy, but the difficult part is finding the rudder trim without looking down, which you want to avoid. Quite often, people look down for the trim switch, and the pitch goes out of control. In every FTD session and later in the Sim, practice reaching for the rudder trim without looking. Once you trim it up, you can put the AP on above 100 ft. The longer you fumble looking for the trim, the longer you are hand flying. Just thought I'd pass that along. I wish someone had told me that years ago when I first flew the thing. Again, not to sound like "Mr. Instructor", but I think it's good advice.

Good luck to you.

DW
 

MercuryPilot

Go NAVY! Beat Army!
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Jet,
If possible, be sure to bring your spouse/significant other with you for the first few days of indoc. JB goes out of their way to sell the company to your whole family and I'm sure they'll really enjoy it.
MP
 

Patriot328

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Dogwood said:
JF,

Not to sound like an instructor, but here's another hint if you're interested: V1 cuts are very easy, but the difficult part is finding the rudder trim without looking down, which you want to avoid. Quite often, people look down for the trim switch, and the pitch goes out of control. In every FTD session and later in the Sim, practice reaching for the rudder trim without looking. Once you trim it up, you can put the AP on above 100 ft. The longer you fumble looking for the trim, the longer you are hand flying. Just thought I'd pass that along. I wish someone had told me that years ago when I first flew the thing.


DW

DW, just to add for him, if you are still not finding the trim by 100ft and you just HAVE to look down (try not to, just practice looking for it while you're sitting in the sim not doing anything), just take your hand off the stick when you do it. The plane is LITTERALLY not going to deviate from where you left it. It will hold pitch and bank.

Amazing piece of machinery, I must admit.
 

321 busdriver

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Find the much easier to locate parking brake handle, and slide your hand forward about two inches. You'll never have to take your eyes off the pfd(EFIS).
Patriot328 said:
DW, just to add for him, if you are still not finding the trim by 100ft and you just HAVE to look down (try not to, just practice looking for it while you're sitting in the sim not doing anything), just take your hand off the stick when you do it. The plane is LITTERALLY not going to deviate from where you left it. It will hold pitch and bank.

Amazing piece of machinery, I must admit.
 

Dogwood

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321 busdriver said:
Find the much easier to locate parking brake handle, and slide your hand forward about two inches. You'll never have to take your eyes off the pfd(EFIS).



Yes, that a good method, as well.

My method, from the right seat, is to find the flap handle with my thumb and then my extended fingers are right over the trim switch, at flaps 1, which is where it will normally be on a V1 cut. At least it doesn't turn and you use the flap handle quite often. There are tons of little tricks on that airplane to help you out, but just find out what works for you.

It's an easy airplane to learn and fly, so you'll have a good time.

Like I said in the prior post, you get 6 weeks to figure it out, and they don't expect you to be an airbus engineer or test pilot. You should have a basic understanding of the systems, how to run the checklists, both electronic and written, and know the flight profiles and limitations. As in any airplane, a good plan on what will happen next is important.

You are not expected to be able to explain exactly when each relay on the airplane opens and closes. Airbus has moved beyond that, thank god.

In comparison, at Piedmont in the mid 1980's we had to name the relays in the 727 elect systems along with the part numbers. I'm glad those days are behind us now. These days it's, "What does the fault light mean, and what can you do about it?" If you can't reset it, "What systems are affected and what are your new limitations?" Not real difficult as the ECAM tells you 75% of what you need to know. Time permitting, you can look up more info if needed.

Sorry for the long winded post.

DW
 

JetFumes

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273
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Thanks for the info Guys/Gals. I can't wait! See you on the line.
 

321 busdriver

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Hey DW, I also started as a 727 FE with Piedmont. Just curious, Did you get furloughed or did you just leave for potentially greener pastures? Again, just curious and best of luck to you.
Dogwood said:
Yes, that a good method, as well.

My method, from the right seat, is to find the flap handle with my thumb and then my extended fingers are right over the trim switch, at flaps 1, which is where it will normally be on a V1 cut. At least it doesn't turn and you use the flap handle quite often. There are tons of little tricks on that airplane to help you out, but just find out what works for you.

It's an easy airplane to learn and fly, so you'll have a good time.

Like I said in the prior post, you get 6 weeks to figure it out, and they don't expect you to be an airbus engineer or test pilot. You should have a basic understanding of the systems, how to run the checklists, both electronic and written, and know the flight profiles and limitations. As in any airplane, a good plan on what will happen next is important.

You are not expected to be able to explain exactly when each relay on the airplane opens and closes. Airbus has moved beyond that, thank god.

In comparison, at Piedmont in the mid 1980's we had to name the relays in the 727 elect systems along with the part numbers. I'm glad those days are behind us now. These days it's, "What does the fault light mean, and what can you do about it?" If you can't reset it, "What systems are affected and what are your new limitations?" Not real difficult as the ECAM tells you 75% of what you need to know. Time permitting, you can look up more info if needed.

Sorry for the long winded post.

DW
 

Dogwood

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321 busdriver said:
Hey DW, I also started as a 727 FE with Piedmont. Just curious, Did you get furloughed or did you just leave for potentially greener pastures? Again, just curious and best of luck to you.



Do you remember the "Holding Relay?" I think it was R-111. Had something to do with "Essential Power" R-52 was the standby relay. Maybe it was the other way around.

Furloughed. Then left for greener pastures. The furlough was the best thing that has happened to me in a long time. Forced me to look around, instead of waiting at the stagnating (sp?) job at US.

Maybe better days are in store for those still there. Only then will the late Tom Davis, Sr. rest comfortably.

Hope you are doing well.

DW
 

321 busdriver

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I thought the holding relay had something to do with all the new hire flight attendants. I'm still here, hoping that the next phase of my career is a whole lot better than the last "few" years. Never really been in any kind of furlough jepordy, so I guess at this point I'll just hang around and see what happens. I'm glad that you and others were able to find other employment. Certainly at the time, I thought U might have done you a favor. As for the future, who knows. Best of luck.
Dogwood said:
Do you remember the "Holding Relay?" I think it was R-111. Had something to do with "Essential Power" R-52 was the standby relay. Maybe it was the other way around.

Furloughed. Then left for greener pastures. The furlough was the best thing that has happened to me in a long time. Forced me to look around, instead of waiting at the stagnating (sp?) job at US.

Maybe better days are in store for those still there. Only then will the late Tom Davis, Sr. rest comfortably.

Hope you are doing well.

DW
 

Laughing_Jakal

Filthy Savage
Joined
May 17, 2004
Posts
187
Total Time
Gobs
MercuryPilot said:
Jet,
If possible, be sure to bring your spouse/significant other with you for the first few days of indoc. JB goes out of their way to sell the company to your whole family and I'm sure they'll really enjoy it.
MP

Not only that, but after JetBlue Indoc, your spouse will be a heck of a lot better at cleaning the house, and you'll even feel obligated to help!
 
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