Tough Decisions

billyjeandj

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Hey guys and gals,

I have a serious dilemma on my hands. I work for a well known freight company that requires a training contract. I may have jumped into this company blindly and not realized what I had gotten myself into. The company is great I'm just not adjusting well. I think I was made to fly people not cargo. I may even be considering going back to school to start a new career.

I'm in the process of sending out applications to a few regionals, I may also have an opportunity to fly a King Air.

How bad does this make me look in the future? Do I bite the bullet and stay? Do I jump ship while I can? Has anyone felt like this before? Or am I just burnt out looking into a bleak future?

I really neeed some help people.

Thanks,
BJ
 

Eagleflip

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What are the details of your training contract, and how long have you been in your current job?

Give us a few more details and I'm sure you'll have more advice than you want. Some of it may actually be good.

:)
 

YODA

Semper Fi
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I am just curious, what is it exactly that you are not adjusting to?:) -YODA
 

pilotyip

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Contract

You entered into a contract freely, the contract may or may not be enforced, the purpose of the contract was to get you to stay in a job that is tuff and slow down turnover to control costs which could put a company out of business. You knew that going in. Now because you don't like it, you want to change your mind. Do the right thing stick it out, when you leave thank them for the opportunity and impress your next employer with your ability to stay in tuff situations and persavere (sp?) Quitting can become habit forming.
 

publisher

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back

when you say you think you were made to fly people not freight I sort of question whether this is the right occupation for you.

at your level of experience, at a people carrier you would mostly be talking on radio's and flying every once in a while.

There is no better experience than flying in an Airnet type situation, single pilot, night, winter, than you will ever get again. It is part of the process.

Who cares what is in the back./
 

DC8Driver

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You signed your name to a contract. Doesn't that mean anything to you? It's called integrity. Do you have any?

Stick it out or pay them off. Only options in my opinion.
 

bobbysamd

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Training contracts

A lot depends on the contract. Maybe you can buy your way out of it. No matter what you do, you don't want to breach the contract. You could get sued or have bill collectors after you. It could wind up on your credit report, which companies often order when considering applicants. In any event, you don't want to get the reputation as not being honorable.

Good luck with your decision.
 

enigma

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Re: back

publisher said:


at your level of experience, at a people carrier you would mostly be talking on radio's and flying every once in a while.

I had a different experience with flying people, early in my career, than you relate. While I certainly don't want the original poster to think that I endorse breaking his contract, I want to point out that he most likely will not have to just sit on his hands when he gets to a commuter. I was flying in the right seat of a Beechliner with less than 1100 hours (no PFT, no AbInitio, no buy-a-job of any kind, total cost incured up to that point of less than 10K, training contract yes).

I flew every other leg as Flying Pilot, the same as I do now 12 years later.


To BillyJeandj:

"Gear Up, Shut Up" Non-Flying-Pilot FO's went away thirty years ago in the airline environment. There may be corporate operators who treat their Co's like gear raisers, but you wouldn't want to work for one of them anyway.

regards,
8N
 

English

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If you are miserable, pay the contract and get out. Wait until you have another job lined up first, though. There is no disgrace in breaking the contract if you pay it back.
 

billyjeandj

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Sorry for the late reply. Thank you everyone for the advice. To shed a little more light I have several months left and several thousand dollars to pay, if I break it. In no way am I trying to get out of the contract by not paying. It's my mistake for not being patient and rushing into this.

I'll stick it out for now. We'll see what the next few months bring. Company dispatch has rubbed me the wrong way a couple times, and the schedule is absolutely terrible. The second part I knew getting into it though. I figure no place to work is ever going to be perfect.

Thanks again,

BJ
 

rightrudder

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Hey publisher

I know you profess to be an expert in this industry, but you are way off base when you say that with his level of experience, he'd spend much of his time operating radios.

Fo's at regional, national and major carriers do fly about 50% of the time. Heck, at my present company i've also had to compute weight & balance for the aircraft, perform first flight of the day tests, and actually start the engines! and yes, i do work the radios on the ground and in the air when i'm pnf.

RR
 

TurboS7

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All I do is fly people and many a trip I have seen the sun set and the sun rise. ........In the summer on the same tank of fuel. Things arn't diffrent flying freight vs. flying people, just the FA's and that is another story in itself.
 

MTOP_set

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Turbo and some others said it, flying freight or people is not all that different. Although most freight is on the "backside of the clock", a lot of 121 people flying is too. It seems to me that quite a bit of flying is in the weird wee hours of the night and morning. If that is what you are having trouble adjusting to you should maybe rethink your flying career. Whatever your choice, don't just quit. You worked hard to get were you are. Try to look at the big picture. Where do you want to be in 5 years? Will this help you get there? Do you enjoy what you are doing?

Good Luck
 

troy

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I signed a contract and it cost me 4 years (USN). I couldn't wait to get out and go back to civilian life. Now, when I look back, I miss it dearly. I know that this is not the exact same situation, but make due of your current situation. At least you have a job, flying at that. I just wish that I had your current job now.

just my .02
 
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