Titanic watch by US News & World Report

Flying the Line

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Posts
417
Total Time
8000
U.S.News & World Report
More Companies At Risk of Failing
Tuesday March 10, 12:46 pm ET
By Rick Newman

Everybody hopes the economy bottoms out and starts to improve tomorrow. Or sooner. But there are few signs of an imminent recovery. One obvious indicator is the health of big companies - you know, the ones that have been announcing all those four- and five-digits layoffs recently. And the outlook for them seems to be getting worse, not better.
[SIZE=-2]ADVERTISEMENT[/SIZE]
if(window.yzq_d==null)window.yzq_d=new Object();window.yzq_d['V.4ql0PDhEE-']='&U=13feh7tsl%2fN%3dV.4ql0PDhEE-%2fC%3d715481.13174424.13345135.1435155%2fD%3dLREC%2fB%3d5405003%2fV%3d1';Moody's, the ratings agency, recently published a list of "bottom rung" companies most likely to default on their debt. The criteria are technical, but the upshot is that a lot of companies are in deep trouble - and the list is getting longer, not shorter. Moody's predicts that the default rate on corporate bonds this year will be three times higher than in 2008, and 15 times higher than in 2007. Defaults are often the last step before a bankruptcy filing. And bankrupt companies, obviously, don't usually hire people. They dramatically shed costs and workers and sometimes liquidate completely, firing everybody.
[See 15 firms that might not survive 2009.]
So the Moody's findings help explain why most economists expect the unemployment rate, now 8.1 percent, to rise as high as 9 or 10 percent before it starts to drift back down. And right now, real and perceived fears about job security are the main force driving a contraction in consumer spending, and the economy as a whole. Here's what the bottom-rung report tells us about the next several months:
There will be a lot more bankruptcies. Moody's places 283 companies on its bottom-rung list, up from 157 a year ago. Since the quarterly list was last updated, 73 additional companies have fallen to the bottom rung. Twenty-four companies made their way off the list - but mostly because they defaulted on their debts. Only one company, Landry's Restaurants, got off the list because its circumstances improved.
[See why bank nationalization terrifies Wall Street.]
Companies exposed to consumer spending have it toughest. The industries most represented on the list are media, automotive, retail and manufacturing. Companies in the most acute danger are those with reduced cash flow and a high debt load. A lot of big, well-known companies are in danger. On the list: Advanced Micro Devices; AirTran; AMR (parent of American Airlines); Chrysler; Duane Reade; Eastman-Kodak; Ford; General Motors; JetBlue; Krispy Kreme; Palm; R.H. Donnelly; Reader's Digest Association; Rite-Aid; UAL (parent of United Airlines); Unisys; and US Airways.
Many of the other firms on the list are second- or third-tier suppliers to automakers, airlines, and other troubled firms. Being on the list doesn't mean a firm is destined for bankruptcy. But it does mean the company faces severe constraints in terms of raising new capital, making new investments, and hiring. Instead of expanding, it may be far more inclined to sell assets, streamline or close divisions, and lay people off to cut costs and raise cash.
[See 6 possible upsides to a GM bankruptcy.]
America's malls are going to end up looking a lot different. The retail sector is obviously getting hammered, with chains like Circuit City and Linens 'n Things already out of business. Many other retail chains are in trouble. Also on the bottom-rung list: Barney's; BCBG Maz Azria; Blockbuster; Brookstone; Claire's Stores; Eddie Bauer; Finlay Fine Jewelry; Harry & David; Loehmann's; Michael's Stores; Oriental Trading Co.; and Sbarro. Again, this doesn't mean the company is doomed. But many of these firms will restructure, close outlets, shrink, and find ways to transform themselves. So if you ever go back to the mall, and your favorite shop has disappeared, you'll know why.
 

WSurf

The Smack Down!
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Posts
3,690
Total Time
6500
Yep, we all know the economy sucks! So buy more stock in beer companies!
 

jonjuan

Honey Ryder
Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Posts
4,155
Total Time
3,000+
Ummmmm, make your own?
 

cpberry1

Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2007
Posts
7
Total Time
1
On that note, and not to hijiack the thread, but are there any other homebrewers on here? Feel free to return to the topic if it's news to you that lots of companies are having problems...
Now enjoying - European Bock
Just bottled - American Hefeweizen
 

Amish RakeFight

Registered Loser
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Posts
8,006
Total Time
.
On that note, and not to hijiack the thread, but are there any other homebrewers on here? Feel free to return to the topic if it's news to you that lots of companies are having problems...
Now enjoying - European Bock
Just bottled - American Hefeweizen
I'd like to hear more about it as well. Like the taste, difficulty, storage life, etc...

Give a Smuttynose a try. Very tasty beer out of NH.

http://www.smuttynose.com/
 

cpberry1

Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2007
Posts
7
Total Time
1
You can find a recipe for about any taste you can think of, from your favorite big brewer to the craft brewers that are coming of age so many places now.
The process isn't difficult, but there is some startup cost associated with the equipment and some patience required for the fermenting. Takes several weeks for most brews from start to finish. Three or 4 hours on day one of cooking and getting it in the fermenter. A few days to a couple weeks later it's time to put it in a second fermenter to clarify it some or just bottle it - another couple of hours. Then a couple more weeks for it to carbonate. I bottled my last batch in November and cracked the first one just a couple weeks ago on my return from Afghanistan. It would keep for several months if I left it alone - for some reason mine never seem to make it that long... Interesting hobby... And thanks for the recommendation - I'll have to try a smuttynose sometime.
 

OurMoney1

Well-known member
Joined
May 4, 2008
Posts
450
Total Time
10000
Ipswich Ale will make you a believer that god does exist and he cares deeply for you.

Amen
 

NERVOUS

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2002
Posts
109
Total Time
Ok!!!
Ipswich Ale will make you a believer that god does exist and he cares deeply for you.

Amen
You my friend, should seriously consider a career in advertising!

Makes me wanna go and drink some Ipswich RIGHT NOW!
 

Mongolikecandy

assume managemnt position
Joined
Dec 6, 2002
Posts
303
Total Time
some
On that note, and not to hijiack the thread, but are there any other homebrewers on here? Feel free to return to the topic if it's news to you that lots of companies are having problems...
Now enjoying - European Bock
Just bottled - American Hefeweizen
Half way through a batch of Vanilla Cream Ale and start brewing a honey ale tomorrow. As for the economy, relax, don't worry... You know the rest.
 

E2LSO

New member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Posts
4
Total Time
2700
I am a big fan of Belgian style ales. Spicy with kind of a sweet aftertaste. Is it possible to home brew that style?
 

WSurf

The Smack Down!
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Posts
3,690
Total Time
6500
See, I figured beer talk would have everyone not worrying about the crappy economy!


HONEY!!! Bring me another PBR! Its march madness and Kansas just lost!
 

Paul R. Smith

Fender Bender
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Posts
722
Total Time
4:30
Sam adams
Winter Lager, and Cherry Wheat


mmmmmmmmmm.

There is a place up the road from my house that has Cherry wheat on tap ftw.
 

MSNFlier

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
118
Total Time
Some
Leinenkugel's Big Butt Doppelbock

And, being from Wisconsin and all, it's good for the local economy, so drink away and keep a Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin Cheesehead employed at the brewery

While Leine's is brewed in Chippewa Falls, just down the road from KEAU, SABMiller bought them a while back. Fortunately, it appears they've been smart enough to leave well-enough alone at the brewery. On the upside they have used their distribution network to bring Leine's to DC, among other places, so us transplants don't have to have our friends pack and send it UPS (very expensive)!
 
Last edited:

crshpdlifr

Registered Used Up
Joined
May 14, 2003
Posts
16
Total Time
5200
wisconsin? naw... Michigan, this economy is worse

So the beer tastes better here, and we have better cherries, Sam Adams Cherry Wheat mmmmmmm.

I guess this thread got hijacked. It's a better subject anyway. Mmm Beer...
 

Ty Webb

Hostage to Fortune
Joined
Dec 10, 2001
Posts
6,525
Total Time
11000+
Speaking of Wisconsin beers . . . New Glarus brewery's "Spotted Cow Ale" will have you throwing rocks at any sam Adams product.
 

DC10

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Posts
145
Total Time
11000
Mine's a pint of Boddington's or Tetley from my homeland or Wexford Irish Cream Ale.

Cheers
 

Amish RakeFight

Registered Loser
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Posts
8,006
Total Time
.
Sam adams
Winter Lager, and Cherry Wheat


mmmmmmmmmm.

There is a place up the road from my house that has Cherry wheat on tap ftw.

I don't know what you're trying to pull here but Sam Adam's Cherry Wheat is disgusting! Yuck. That's some foul tasting beer. Too much sweet cherry flavor and not enough bitterness. Ughh. I get nauseous just thinking about how terrible it tasted. BTW, this was out of a bottled 6-pack, not a tap.
 
Top