T-28 first flight

svcta

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Well, I flew the T-28 for the first time today. What a machine! Everything that the T-6 needed they built in to the T-28. Power, ergonomics, cleaner aerodynamic habits. And the inertia that thing carries around is amazing. Point it at the sky and it keeps going that way. Great flying airplane so far...I can't wait to learn more about it.

People in the know feel free to lend advice.....
 

VNugget

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Nice, would love to hear more. Never flown one yet, but sat in one on the ground once, and was surprised that I felt just a little bit intimidated (this is after 500 T-6 hours). Dunno if it had to do with how high you're off the ground or what.
 

svcta

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Yeah, as tall as the T-6 feels for a single-engine (I remember pulling up to some guys in a King Air-200 once and looking down on them) the -28 is a behemoth. It's a little weird getting used to having a nose gear; I haven't flown a trike that wasn't a jet in probably 7 years.

Ours is an F model so the R-1820 on it is derated to "only" 1300 HP, which is still a tremendous amount of power and really gives the airplane some guts.

With the T-6 there was always the idea of energy management chasing after you at every turn, and after my first hour in the T-28 I could feel that worry sort of being washed away. Vertical performance vs the T-6 was easily doubled, even at reasonably gentle climb power settings.

The gear retraction cycle is really swift, probably 3 -4 seconds and the airplane accelerates quickly from that point to the 130 knot climb speed and then gains altitude sharply. The T-6 has great control feel. Progressively stiff as you approach the 200 MPH mark but smooth and predictable. The -28 feels much the same way but refined to a point that the airplane is genuinely light on the controls and has a nearly "hydraulic" feel to it. Just smooth and crisp from stall to a well over 200kts (as fast as I've been so far)/ Very well harmonized, too, from what I could seen in an hour. The airplane begs to climb even with high bank angles, maybe as a result of my habit of pulling the -6 back to altitude in steeper maneuvers. I found that as I cross referenced back in to the cockpit I regularly had to counter a 1000FPM developing climb during some steep turns as I felt the thing out.

I fell in love with North American Aircraft when I started flying the T-6. The T-28 doesn't appear to be anything other than just a big step up in all areas.

Have to run out now, more to come if anyone else is interested. Thanks for sharing my enthusiasm!
 
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A-Track

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Sounds like fun. Yeah I worked on one once and was supprised at how far up you have to climb to get into the thing, definately a cool airplane. Must post pics.
 

stearmann4

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The 28' is definitely a man's airplane. It's got all the early jet systems with a Wright radial up front. I rember the first time I taxied it during my training, I taxied past a B-25 and looked down on the cockpit.

For such a large airplane I was impressed how fast it accelerated. You've got to be quick with the gear handle (while not accidentally deploying the speed brake!) to avoid going through gear speed. It's a little known fact that a 28B will hang with a stock P-51 up to about 10,000ft.

I've never flown another airplane that I felt like I was swallowed by like the 28'. It must have been an intimidating first aircraft for Naval Aviators in the day.It doesn't even seem to compare to the T-34Cs now.

I was also impressed at how table it was, and what a great roll rate it has. Almost no rudder needed in rolls unless you really want to tighten it up. It spins very well too.

What a great ride!
 

pilotyip

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38 hrs TT at solo

Must be a pretty good bird, the Navy turned guys like me loose in it with a total of about 38 hours. Lets us take it to the boat solo with about 125 hours. Ready Room gouge stuff students tell other students to get them ready for their next flight. "To counter P-factor put the right rudder to the floor then release the brakes, if it goes right, only think about left, it will go straight". That was at 1425 HP
 
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svcta

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Absolutely an easy airplane to fly. Pretty forgiving based on what I've seen so far and the hardest part about flying the-28 is taking care of the powerplant. Which is a number's game and also easy to do if you just pay attention. The big thing stalls like a giant 172, just heavier and more stable. Even with some power on it it doesn't break. It just buffets and goes straight ahead. The -6 would send you on a wild ride if you ham-fisted your way through a stall series. Not the case here. Just a hint of relaxed back pressure and it stands at attention.

I have to say, getting ready for the rating ride I've been in the books a bunch and it is an impressively designed airplane. Certainly nothing that the GA community would have embraced! I wasn't expecting the level of sophistication in the few systems that it has. Lots of thermal and pressure relievers, solenoids, etc. It seems like selecting one item makes about 3 things happen in order to deliver it. Electrically closing a bypass valve, opening a pressure valve, positioning hydraulic locking valves at the correct moments.......The good news is that all the service items appear to be really easy to get to.

Part of the volume of information, though, is trying to become reasonably familiar with the differences between the 4 models (B,C,D,Fennec).
 
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f9driver

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You guys are really bringing back some memories. Flew that great airplane 54 yrs ago in 1957 when it was pretty new. We used 56.5" MAP then and in carquals the LSO would make you hold the run-up until your legs hurt.
We were based at NAAS Barin Fld. in Foley, Ala. for this stage....and gunnery. We were bussed to abandoned Bronson Fld for Field Carrier Landing practice. The LSO's would fly the airplanes over and every morning they would buzz us so low we literally had to hit the ground as we played "mumbley peg"(sic) with our knives in the adjoining field. Good ole Navy "what didn't kill you made you stronger." ggg.
 

LR25

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I was wanting to get one when I got out of A&P school, right when the Navy was retiring them, never did. Best sounding airplane around, you always know when its a T-28 before you spot it.

Envious indeed.
 

Mud Eagle

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Best sounding airplane around, you always know when its a T-28 before you spot it.
Best sounding? No, not as long as there's still a Rolls Merlin, Rolls Griffon, or a V-1710 Allison still operational in the world...

But sofar as being unique and identifiable? Absolutely....I'd recognize that pop-pop-pop-pop anywhere!
 

Fubijaakr

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But sofar as being unique and identifiable? Absolutely....I'd recognize that pop-pop-pop-pop anywhere!
The skies of South Texas haven't sounded the same since VT-27 retired their last Trojan.
 

svcta

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They fixed that with the ground attack versions...Fennec (Desert Fox) and AT-28D (operated by a bunch called the Ravens... CIA)

Thank god...

Edit: Cool reading here if you've got some time to kill.

http://www.aircommandos.org/BobAndDon/
 
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Sandhawk

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There was (is) a YAT-28 for sale in SoCal at an aircraft dealer's hangar a couple of years ago.....neede a LOT of work!

I'd be willing to bet that the YAT-28 was a real screamer with that T-prop hung on the front!!
 

Mud Eagle

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The big problem would be the engine and gearbox with the YAT-28E.

The gearboxes were custom built and there were only a half dozen ever made.
 

svcta

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Yikes....time to hit the T-28 boards. Glad the two inside got out. Not enough video to see if there was anything visibly wrong but an important note is that an R-1820 has a very unique sound. When running properly, especially at lower power settings, I could see it mistaken for sputtering by the non initiated.

A quick head scratcher: What the hell is doofus talking about at 1:50 in the video? Those aren't the runway illusions I remember learning or teaching. Or applicable at all to, well, anything.
 

kingairpilot

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Ravens by Christopher Robbins is a wonderful book that traces the history of the FAC program in Laos. It seems that a war run by LT.s and Capts. can be run quite efficently. There are also some really good Raven videos on the net showing both the L19 and the T28. Wonder what these guys could have done with a Skyraider to FAC in?

ka
They fixed that with the ground attack versions...Fennec (Desert Fox) and AT-28D (operated by a bunch called the Ravens... CIA)

Thank god...

Edit: Cool reading here if you've got some time to kill.

http://www.aircommandos.org/BobAndDon/
 
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