Switching jobs ...

flywithruss

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Question ... is there a problem with leaving a "good" corporate job after two months working to take a "great" corporate job elsewhere? I didn't sign a training contract, but the "great" job is working for folks I've known a long time. I don't want to burn any bridges, of course. Would appreciate feedback from others who may have experienced something similar ....

Thanks, and tailwinds ...

R
 

banned username 2

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Well you gotta look out for #1... You will most definately "burn the bridge" so make sure if you are making a jump out of the pot it isn't straight into the fire... Make sure it is a worth while jump, this is a small industry and people talk...

If you think this "new" job will be the end all, be all of jobs... then I would say make the jump... just be careful...

By the way, how much money did your current employer spend on you? Did they just train you in house or did you get a Type Rating?

Good Luck and let us know what you do...
 

Gulfstream 200

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yeah be careful......but....
absolutly look out for NUMBER ONE!!!
you will definitly be burning that bridge, especially if they moved you, trained you, FSI, etc......
are they are rather reputable outfit?? remember, its a VERY small business and people talk...if they are considered good people, you will get a bad rep quick...did they bend over for you? do you a favor by hiring you? will you trash a friend who rec'd you here??? be very careful.....never ever screw friends in the corp world (or any i say), they are the only ones who get you jobs.
but again, if the new job is THE JOB you see yourself at for a long time, you gotta go with #1.

I always say, they will throw you out just as fast if they needed to, dont let anyone kid you! This isnt afreiendly game, striclty business.
 

empenage

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flywithruss:

Two good posts there. I have to agree. Do what is right for you. It is business. I have known guys that left after 2 weeks at a "good" corporate job. But be careful as well. I had a friend that left a good job for what looked like a great job and they sold the plane on him a month after he was hired.

Instead of losing sleep over it go down to Walmart and buy a magic 8 ball. I have one on my desk. It works great and takes all the guess work out of those tough decisions.

Good luck.
 

Tri-holer

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Just my $.02
I gotta agree with Jim. Looking out for #1 is all well and good when you have to. This isn't a case of have to. It is a case of want to and you will be screwing the company that was willing to put you on and invest in you.
Professionalism doesn't dictate that you spend your life with a company just because they hired you. Somethimes professionalism dictates that you leave a company (there is usually a good reason).
It is your decision and you need to decide what is best for you but the consideration of others is something you need to look at too. Those who hired you and those who will pay the price in the future for your actions today.

See, Pollyanna isn't dead.
 

flywithruss

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Great input!

This is why I keep coming to this board ... everyone's input is great, and very much appreciated!

To answer some of the questions posted ... the current job is a King Air, so no type required, but the current employer did pay for my school in the airplane, and a small investment in uniforms. They did not pay for my move ... I did.

The potential new job is with folks with a long-standing department who I've known very well for a long time, doing more flying in a better airplane. This is a job I'd strongly consider making a career out of.

I am inclined to agree with those who say no one else is looking out for me. If I make the move, I am going to do my best to be as forthright as possible with the current employer, so that they would understand as much as they can my motives for making the change. They may be mad at me if I leave, but hopefully will feel regardless like I acted with integrity, which is important.

Continued feedback is appreciated ... this'll take a couple of weeks to pan out, but I will let you all know how it comes down.

Tailwinds ...

R
 

banned username 2

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Russ,

I'd say given the information that you have presented, I would take the opportunity... Remember if you wait a year or so, that other opening will be long gone...

I agree you don't want to keep jumping jobs because it is bad for everyone... but for those guys who say you need to stay.... I will bet you $100 that if they started working for one of the regionals and within a month or two got called by a Major all of them would drop the regional like a bad habit...

As far as not getting a type, that is a plus for you... since this way it doesn't look like you just "stopped in" for a free type rating... If you want, you could make a gesture to reimburse them for the uniform costs, that is up to you. Also another good gesture is if you know of someone who would be an excellent replacement for them you could suggest this person. It would kind of like be going to them with a problem (you are leaving) and a solution (you already found your replacement for them)... Just make sure if you do recommend someone they will fit in with the company...

Good luck to you!
 

resq swimmer

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me too

I too have a hard decision to make regarding a different job. The flight department I have longed for years to work for is rumored to begin hiring again. This IS the retirement job, I'm talking long term commitment. My trouble is that I have just recently been typed, and they did pay for my move over a year ago. I feel loyal to give back some, but I also don't want this opportunity that I have been working toward pass by. Decisions decisions!!!
 

Gulfstream 200

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lets not even try and relate GULFSTREAM PFT with corporate operators and job-hopping.
leaving a bottom rung corporate job for something better is nothing but a smart career move. period. Wait around in this business and you will miss too much.
If you are making sub-standard pay and a bad quality of life, you are just filling a spot that they KNOW will be vacant annually....why do you think you wont get typed and make so little??? (this is just an example)
Good corporate jobs dont need training contracts, commitments, etc......they wont hire an underexperienced pilot (unless highly reccomended), they dont advertise on the web for openings, and they dont hire airline guys on furlough.
If you find a good Pt91 corp gig that seems like a good spot to settle for a long time, take it.
Best advice I can give anyone is again not to screw friends who help you get a job, commit there, if you promised (written or otherwise) to stay for a year... DO IT.....but certainly dont worry about saving a billionaire the 25K training cost at FSI I say....if the job was good you wouldnt be leaving in the first place. After the 30th pilot leaves, maybe thier pay will come up to standards...well.....maybe not.

No matter what anyone says, look out for # 1......
loyalty dont pay the bills when that rat-sh%t charter job goes away overnight!!

Good Luck!
 

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PFT was developed because there was way more pilots around than jobs... PERIOD.... It wasn't cuz there was such high turn-over that they had too... PFT came about during one of the worst hiring slumps around... There was very little movement in the industry and about the only airline jobs out there were PFT...

Don't kid yourself... it was all supply and demand economics (too much supply of pilots and too little demand for jobs!)... not cuz Great Lakes or whoever was losing too many pilots too quickly....

There was very little turnover back then... the airlines were just trying to boost their bottom line in a down economy... And because people actually did the PFT thing, it thrived....
 

Gulfstream 200

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Jim-

"there are plenty of corporate operators who require the pilot to send himself through FlightSafety"

really? where???
who would do this??
who can AFFORD to do this?
REAL corporate A/C cost 25-50K for a FSI visit!

remember, EJA is NOT a corporate operator. (from what I recall they used to require PFT, now its another form called a "training contract" I think...they are an airline. good and bad i suppose, but thats another story

Unprofessional to walk after someone pays for your training??? Not necessarily.......i myself think its MORE unprofessional to pay less than industry standards....and downright foolish if you are the pilot staying there being abused!
Be a true professional I say, but only when you are treated like a professional. Professionals get respected and PAID. period. And smart professionals work hard, take advantage of opportunities, and look out for #1 (How do you think that boss bought his GIV??) I bet it wasn't company loyalty.....

The jobs I am talking about are the revolving door jobs, operators who hire low time guys, throw them in a jet, maybe give them a little training, MAYBE a trip to FSI after a year, pay them very low, and know they will leave. There are a lot of these. Low time guys should take advantage of the oppotunities, say THANKS and LEAVE!!!!

If you want to be the one who stays to make a point, so be it. But this practise has been going on for years and wont ever change! Its a career, there are steps to take, and maybe YES a few bridges get burned. All I am saying is pick them carefully.

Its not personal, its business ---- On both the pilot and the employers end.

Hope the wx is good in Hawaii, you are lucky.
 

CE650SC

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Switching Jobs...

I think the original question was," is it ok to leave a corporate job after 2 months?"
If the other job is better, then by all means, leave! It amazes me that companies can pay pilots so little and at the end of the day we are all afraid to say we found something better. If they don't want to lose you, maybe they will offer you more money to stay. If they don't care that you are leaving, then what does that tell you. I worked for three companies that payed below the poverty level, and when I handed them my resignation letter they looked at me with this puzzled look. When you find out they are hiring people right out of college for entry level jobs and they are paying them twice as much as they are paying you, it's time to leave. The problem is we all (pilots) continue to allow people to treat us this way. What would they do if people quit taking the jobs for $25,000 a year? They can afford to purchase multi million dollar aircraft and fly all over at $1,000 an hour but can only pay you $2,000 a month, there is something wrong with this picture. I don't care if you leave in a year or 10 years, they should pay enough for you to live comfortably! The Chief Pilot's are as much to blame as anyone. They should fight for the pay for their help. When I go to work I want to work with someone who is happy and has no worries. Pay well, give 'em time off, get your help some nice perks and I believe they'll probably stick around for a few years, but even if they don't you had a content, and safe pilot while he was working with you.

Got off on a rabbit trail, OOps. If it's a better job, explain it to your current employer. If they don't understand there is nothing you can do about it. Leave nicely, and even though they may get upset with you, in the end they will respect you. You never know the guy your flying with right now may be asking you for a job some day?

"Be careful whose toes you step on on the way up the ladder, because they may be attached to the butt your Kissing on the way back down." That statement works both ways.

Good luck to you,
 

DC8Driver

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A very sage D.O. once told me,"windows of opportunity open quickly and they slam shut even faster".
 
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