SWA Hiring

crj200driver

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I have heard rumors lately that SWA is only hiring about 50% of the applicants they interview. Is there any truth to this, and if there is, what are the chances of a guy without a 737 type who already has a scheduled interview making it through and being asked to come work for SWA?
 

mule

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Well...if they are hiring 50%, then I guess it means you've got about a 50-50 shot...

Seriously though, I believe it is more like 20-30%. The last two people that I know that have gone have had 2 out of 12 people on their date hired and 2 of 11. Not sure if that is an indicator for the whole month, but it is what it is.
 

F16TJ

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I think the numbers are lower than that. From my HPA class, 4 of 12 got hired. From my interview group only 2 of 11 got the call. From no official source, I've heard the 30% number kicked around.

Whatever it is, do your best and good luck!
 

LearLove

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Having followed SWA hiring for the last 7 years I seen figures from places like AirInc and such in the 2 out of 5 to 1 out of 4 interviewed gets the job. This is 40 to 25% which when averaged goes along with the 30% mentioned above.

Traditionally SWA interviewes 2 to 3 times the number of applicants per one pilot position compared to other airlines.
 

'72Gremlin

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Personally, as long as you have your interview, I believe that you are now on a level playing field with everyone who has the type rating. I don't think the type rating is a discriminator at the interview or the decision board. Of the 3 people I know of that didn't have the type rating, but had an interview, all of them received the call. That's 100%. Just one dude's observation.... Good luck....
 

crj200driver

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Thanks for the replies, I am definately going to give it my all. It's just nice to know whether I am on level playing field or not.
 

MotoX

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I got the Dear John letter recently myself. I thought I had what it took, but I guess not. No biggie, at least I can say I gave it a shot. Best of luck to all of you who are trying to get on. SWA is an awesome place!! I can say I am finished with the "airline" industry. This was my last swing as a "major" airline pilot. It's Barbie jets for now on for me.

BTW, I have a 737 type rating for sell if anyone is interested?!? Brand new and never used!! Bid starting at 1 dollar!!
 
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Flyum

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Got the good news call in OCT. 6 out of 12 got the Call! All had their TYPE. 4 of the 6 were military. Hope this helps. You gotta try...this place is amazing!
 

ezviper

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Very good news that you got an interview w/o type. I heard that SW was going to start doing that as the "pool" got smaller. 3 out of 10 were hired from 22 Sep interview, good luck!
 

murano

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Wow! A civilian guy without a 737 type rating getting an interview at SWA?! That is good news. Let me update my online app. :)
 

AlbieF15

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...FWIW...the highest percentage I have (something like 90%) in helping SWA clients is with Express Jet pilots with civilian backgrounds. Nobody is "automatic" at SWA but they've hired a bunch of those guys. Your "civilians get hired less than military..." is anecdotal and not accurate. This has been addressed on other threads...
 

OffHot

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What I would like to know is how many people get hired with and with out paying for prep. I know I got hired without it, and I personally don't know of anyone who did get hired with it. Not that it is a bad thing.
 

NEDude

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Not bashing interview prep folks here, but a friend at SWA said not to do the prep. I was kind of suprised at that myself. I'd be torn if I were fortunate enough to get the call. On one hand I'd want to feel prepared and that I did all I could to have the best interview. On the other hand this friend of mine said the interviewers he knows don't like the prep and like to see the (for lack of a better term) "less polished" type of interviewees because they feel it gives them a better idea of what you are really like.
 

N1kawotg

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MURANO, Albie is right. Know 3 express jet guys that have been called for Nov interviews. 2 do not have the type.

UPDATE,UPDATE,UPDATE
 

New FDX Guy

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NEDude said:
On the other hand this friend of mine said the interviewers he knows don't like the prep and like to see the (for lack of a better term) "less polished" type of interviewees because they feel it gives them a better idea of what you are really like.

This assumes that the interviewer can actually discern who has done prep and who hasn't. They often have it backwards. I agree with the concept that they'd prefer folks don't do the prep (or that everyone did), because it would provide them with a common ground.

Interview prep doesn't make you into something that you aren’t; it allows you to learn how to present your genuine personality without making the rookie mistakes (i.e. being too stiff and monotone while answering basic questions, twiddling your thumbs or saying ummm all the time), as well as many other things. You might be the life of the party, a great guy to talk to in the cockpit...but this might not come through when there are two captains sitting across from you asking about your whole life for a mere 30 minutes.

Some probably don't need the prep, some it helps greatly and some get their refund in the form of their original check, which was never cashed. Poor guys never had a chance and just didn't know it.

Don't make the mistake of not doing the training because you think that's what the airline wants. Choose on whether you think it will benefit you in presenting the best side of the real you.
 

BMW

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New FDX Guy said:
This assumes that the interviewer can actually discern who has done prep and who hasn't. They often have it backwards. I agree with the concept that they'd prefer folks don't do the prep (or that everyone did), because it would provide them with a common ground.

Interview prep doesn't make you into something that you aren’t; it allows you to learn how to present your genuine personality without making the rookie mistakes (i.e. being too stiff and monotone while answering basic questions, twiddling your thumbs or saying ummm all the time), as well as many other things. You might be the life of the party, a great guy to talk to in the cockpit...but this might not come through when there are two captains sitting across from you asking about your whole life for a mere 30 minutes.

Some probably don't need the prep, some it helps greatly and some get their refund in the form of their original check, which was never cashed. Poor guys never had a chance and just didn't know it.

Don't make the mistake of not doing the training because you think that's what the airline wants. Choose on whether you think it will benefit you in presenting the best side of the real you.

Well said!!
 

Resume Writer

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As said by New FDX Guy, there are people that get hired with prep and people that do not. There is no magic bullet with prep. Most people are never taught how to interview, what the interviewer looks for in a candidate, and how your answers might come across in the interview.

What I teach people to do is use their stories in a format that will not get them into trouble. I call it "framing your story." Much like a person that "frames" a house, a logical method is used to build that house. Would a framer put up a wall on one side of the house and then go to the opposite side and put up another wall? Or, would the framer put up one wall and then connect the next wall to the first one?

Similarly, there is a process and methodology to interviewing. If a person has never conducted interviews as a hiring authority, does not have a great deal of experience interviewing, or has not interviewed in years, it is very difficult to ascertain what the interviewer is looking for in a candidate. A good interview prep service, of which there are many out there, teach a candidate how to answers questions in a logical format, critique the answers they provide, and help them to frame the stories in a more logical format. They do not teach people to give "canned answers."
 

:-)

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Resume Writer said:
What I teach people to do is use their stories in a format that will not get them into trouble. I call it "framing your story." Much like a person that "frames" a house, a logical method is used to build that house. Would a framer put up a wall on one side of the house and then go to the opposite side and put up another wall? Or, would the framer put up one wall and then connect the next wall to the first one?
Do you know of any concrete evidence proving that someone who can tell a story that is "well framed" actually makes a better pilot/employee than someone who isn't a professional story teller?

:)
 

Resume Writer

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:-) said:
Do you know of any concrete evidence proving that someone who can tell a story that is "well framed" actually makes a better pilot/employee than someone who isn't a professional story teller?

:)

It's not about being a professional story teller. It is about being able to tell your story in a manner that is understandable, logical, succinct and gets the point across regarding your past performance, which hiring people believe dictates your future performance. That is why they use behavioral-style interview questions.

I do not know of any "concrete evidence" that correlates story telling with being a better employee. But what if you are a great person who cannot tell a story well? I believe it limits your chances to ultimately show what a great employee you can be to an employer.

Just my thoughts.
 

apdsm

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:-) said:
Do you know of any concrete evidence proving that someone who can tell a story that is "well framed" actually makes a better pilot/employee than someone who isn't a professional story teller?

:)

No, however, there is concrete evidence that when candidates get comfortable they forget they are in an interview and truths come out that would be better left unsaid (from the candidates point of view)!

Also, I have spoken to several of the interviewers and every one of them says they can tell when someone is not being honest and/or not being themselves.
 
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