Special Issuance Medical question

celloman

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Hey Guys,

A few weeks ago I lost my medical. The good new is that I will be able to get it back with a Special Issuance.

I am trying to figure out my work and financial situation.

What kind of time frame can I look at from the date I provide the FAA with all the paper work to it being approved?

If any of you have advice that might help could you please send me a PM?

Thanks in advance!
 

pilotyip

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Remember if you carry a Special Issuance you must carry a copy of the Special Issuance letter with you every time you fly.
 

Hugh Johnson

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Yep
It depends on why you lost it. Took me exactly a year to get mine back.
 

11daysoff

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It all depends why you lost your medical, but I'd say plan on at least 2-3 months. If you're in a union, your union docs can really help out. If you're not, it may be wise to have the AOPA docs help you. It will cost you but will be worth it in the end.
 

PARAMOUNT

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a lot
It all depends on why you lost your medical. I have a good friend of mine who lost his medical to due a heart attack, and he is looking at at least 6-9 months, if he is lucky. What is the reason you lost your medical?

P.
 

celloman

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I was diagnosed with type II diabetes.

After seeing the Docotor and talking with the AOPA medical staff I feel confident I will get my medical back.

There is a 60 day wait then I can reaply as long as I meet all the criteria.

My question is once the 60 days have passed and I submit my paperwork to the FAA in OKC how long does it take the FAA to actually look at your paper work and hear back?

Thanks,

PS I know a guy who had a heart attack and it took him a little over 6 months to get his back.
 

Maria

That's Miz Beetch to you
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Three weeks to get denied. Don't know how long to get it back, it's been 9 months.
 

BoilerUP

Citation style...
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Virtual Flight Surgeons.

They helped me via ALPA Aeromedical with an issue I had back in 2007 (military medical disqualification); their expertise in working with the FAA on Special Issuances is Worth EVERY PENNY you will pay them....
 

Choppy

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Do you mind if i ask how old you are?



I was diagnosed with type II diabetes.

After seeing the Docotor and talking with the AOPA medical staff I feel confident I will get my medical back.

There is a 60 day wait then I can reaply as long as I meet all the criteria.

My question is once the 60 days have passed and I submit my paperwork to the FAA in OKC how long does it take the FAA to actually look at your paper work and hear back?

Thanks,

PS I know a guy who had a heart attack and it took him a little over 6 months to get his back.
 

NCFlyer

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Congratulations
 

Amish RakeFight

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.
Type II diabetes can be cured through surgery.


http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/04/17/60minutes/main4023451.shtml

"Well, they go home on no medication," he says. "And I've followed them now for 10 and 15 years, and see no evidence of recurrence. So, it's pretty darn close."

Studies confirm that about 80 percent of diabetics go into complete remission following the operation. Obesity is considered one of the major causes of type 2 diabetes, but here's something odd: when you have the gastric bypass operation, your diabetes goes away long before you lose the weight.

For Travis, the man who lost 260 pounds in seven months, it took "about a week and a half" before he was rid of diabetes and off all his medication.

Another male patient named Bill said it took him four days. "I went into the hospital on Friday, came home on Monday and dumped my pills," he told Stahl.

This spontaneous remission puzzled Italian surgeon Francesco Rubino, now at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center. "We wanted to know what is making diabetes remit. We thought it could have been something to do with the small bowel," Dr. Rubino says.

So he began performing the bypass on diabetic rats, and realized that when he disconnected the top of the small intestine, an area called the duodenum, the diabetes disappeared. Then, he reversed the operation.

When he reattached it, the diabetes came back.

This was a pivotal discovery. By merely blocking food from traveling through the duodenum, Rubino sent diabetes into remission, proving the effect was independent from weight loss. This meant diabetes could essentially be removed with a scalpel.

Dr. Rubino says this operation has been performed on humans.
 
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