Southwest Airlines Reports Loss

weasel_lips

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Southwest Reports Net Loss Due to Fuel Hedges
Companies:Southwest Airlines Co


By Reuters | 16 Oct 2008 | 07:10 AM ET

Southwest Airlines reported a quarterly net loss on Thursday, reversing a year-ago profit, on charges related to its fuel hedging program.

The low cost airline's third-quarter net loss amounted to $120 million, or 16 cents per share, compared with a profit of $162 million, or 22 cents per share, a year earlier.
Excluding one-time items, Southwest earned $69 million, or 9 cents per share, beating the average Wall Street estimate of 7 cents per share, according to Reuters Estimates.
The airline industry has been severely battered this year by soaring fuel costs that peeked at a record high in July before falling rapidly.
Southwest, whose fuel hedges are the envy of the industry, was somewhat insulated from the spike in fuel prices but reported charges of $247 million related to adjustments on a portion of the future period of its hedge portfolio.
The airline's revenue rose about 12 percent to $2.9 billion. The company ended the quarter with $3.4 billion in cash and short term investments.


For The Latest Earnings News, Click Here


Copyright 2008 Reuters. Click for restrictions.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/27212517
 
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Bavarian Chef

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120 dollars? Not too bad.

;)
 

Kharma Police

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"Ding" you are now free to lose money like the rest of us.
 

RedDogC130

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You heard it here first 6 pages, over 10,000 views, and 25 posts by General Lee.
 

momalley81

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Southwest Reports Net Loss Due to Fuel Hedges
Companies:Southwest Airlines Co


By Reuters | 16 Oct 2008 | 07:10 AM ET

Southwest Airlines reported a quarterly net loss on Thursday, reversing a year-ago profit, on charges related to its fuel hedging program.

The low cost airline's third-quarter net loss amounted to $120 million, or 16 cents per share, compared with a profit of $162 million, or 22 cents per share, a year earlier.
Excluding one-time items, Southwest earned $69 million, or 9 cents per share, beating the average Wall Street estimate of 7 cents per share, according to Reuters Estimates.
The airline industry has been severely battered this year by soaring fuel costs that peeked at a record high in July before falling rapidly.
Southwest, whose fuel hedges are the envy of the industry, was somewhat insulated from the spike in fuel prices but reported charges of $247 million related to adjustments on a portion of the future period of its hedge portfolio.
The airline's revenue rose about 12 percent to $2.9 billion. The company ended the quarter with $3.4 billion in cash and short term investments.


For The Latest Earnings News, Click Here


Copyright 2008 Reuters. Click for restrictions.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/27212517
SWA posted a $69 Million Operating profit.

The whole reason there are reporting a loss is due to a change in account rules that Congress voted in, in which SWA has to take a charge on it's fuel hedges since they have become less valuable.
 

jetflier

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Remember that the "Jerry Springer" crowd will not be flying when air fare's cost more than Greyhound.
 

RedDogC130

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SWA posted a $69 Million Operating profit.

The whole reason there are reporting a loss is due to a change in account rules that Congress voted in, in which SWA has to take a charge on it's fuel hedges since they have become less valuable.
Plus it shows the pilots during negotiations that the lost money and can't afford to pay us any more $$$
 

Bavarian Chef

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SWA posted a $69 Million Operating profit.

The whole reason there are reporting a loss is due to a change in account rules that Congress voted in, in which SWA has to take a charge on it's fuel hedges since they have become less valuable.
Not a luv hater, but you're saying some losses are real and some aren't?

So Delta made a profit yesterday, but more importantly, American didn't. If you can't count special one time charges (expenses), I guess you can't count one time gains.
 

RedDogC130

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Not a luv hater, but you're saying some losses are real and some aren't?

So Delta made a profit yesterday, but more importantly, American didn't. If you can't count special one time charges (expenses), I guess you can't count one time gains.
we are still getting our profitsharing off the $69 million or whatever amount gain.
 

lowecur

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And it could get worse.

Most of the $2.2B in cash is tied up in fuel hedge contracts. Just think what will happen if oil continues to fall, and more write downs occur, + they are going to have to sell those positions at a loss to gain liquidity.

We'll see how loyal all the takers are if the company rolls over in the next year or so.

:pimp:​
 

Falcon Jet 1

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when you guys learn about GAap accounting, then you would understand. SWA made money.
 

(HCDAW)

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Not a luv hater, but you're saying some losses are real and some aren't?

So Delta made a profit yesterday, but more importantly, American didn't. If you can't count special one time charges (expenses), I guess you can't count one time gains.
It goes like this:

Month 1 : You have $20 mil in fuel hedges (the value has been the same for months, oil has been stable). You bring in $100 mil in revenue and your expenses are $90 mil. Your profit for the month is ($100mil - $90mil) $10 mil.

Month 2 : Oil prices skyrocket (your $20 mil hedges are now worth $40 mil). You bring in $100 mil in revenue and your expenses are $90 mil. Your profit is still $10 mil, but you are now required to report unrealized gains from your hedging positions so you get a second number, a profit of $30 mil ($10 mil + the change in value of hedges of $20 mil). Keep in mind you did not buy or sell any hedges.

Month 3 : Oil prices tank (your $40 mil hedges are now worth $1 mil). You bring in $100 mil, expenses are $90 mil, profit is $10 mil. Once again you have to report another number with one time losses from decline in hedges. ($10 mil - $39 mil = net loss of $29 mil).

As you can see, you are still making the same amount of money month to month, but it looks different because of accounting rules. I know this is simplistic, but that's the general idea behind the two numbers.
 

Hoke

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Southwest Airlines Reports Third Quarter Financial Results70th Consecutive Quarterly Operating Profit
DALLAS, Oct. 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Southwest Airlines (NYSE: LUV) today reported its 70th consecutive quarterly operating profit.
 
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Bavarian Chef

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we are still getting our profitsharing off the $69 million or whatever amount gain.
Who cares? That wasn't my point. JB did the same for me last year (or was it the previous).
 
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GuppyWN

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Let's get it on. I'll be the first to admit I've cherry picked lines and bullet points in the past. Fact is GAAP's or not, it's a loss. We can't expect to toot our own horn killing them with hedges if we don't take our lumps when we're late pulling the trigger on them.

BUT! I'm not voing for a pay freeze! $69 million profit on half empty planes is a good sign to me.

Gup
 

Bavarian Chef

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It goes like this:

Month 1 : You have $20 mil in fuel hedges (the value has been the same for months, oil has been stable). You bring in $100 mil in revenue and your expenses are $90 mil. Your profit for the month is ($100mil - $90mil) $10 mil.

Month 2 : Oil prices skyrocket (your $20 mil hedges are now worth $40 mil). You bring in $100 mil in revenue and your expenses are $90 mil. Your profit is still $10 mil, but you are now required to report unrealized gains from your hedging positions so you get a second number, a profit of $30 mil ($10 mil + the change in value of hedges of $20 mil). Keep in mind you did not buy or sell any hedges.

Month 3 : Oil prices tank (your $40 mil hedges are now worth $1 mil). You bring in $100 mil, expenses are $90 mil, profit is $10 mil. Once again you have to report another number with one time losses from decline in hedges. ($10 mil - $39 mil = net loss of $29 mil).

As you can see, you are still making the same amount of money month to month, but it looks different because of accounting rules. I know this is simplistic, but that's the general idea behind the two numbers.
I didn't argue the operating profit. But a bottom line loss (or profit) is a loss or a profit.

The fundamentals contained therein are, of course, a different matter.

If a company loses money, they lose money. It's that simple, imho.
 

Bavarian Chef

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Let's get it on. I'll be the first to admit I've cherry picked lines and bullet points in the past. Fact is GAAP's or not, it's a loss. We can't expect to toot our own horn killing them with hedges if we don't take our lumps when we're late pulling the trigger on them.

BUT! I'm not voing for a pay freeze! $69 million profit on half empty planes is a good sign to me.

Gup

Good point.

At least you can be wise enough to realize that every post in this thread is not an attack on luv or its hedges.

Good luck.
 

(HCDAW)

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I didn't argue the operating profit. But a bottom line loss (or profit) is a loss or a profit.

The fundamentals contained therein are, of course, a different matter.

If a company loses money, they lose money. It's that simple, imho.

Well, if someone bases their financial decisions on paper gains and losses they are not very wise (my opinion only). The point is there wasn't money lost any more than there was money gained when oil was at $140/bbl. But, that is why there are two numbers, so that you can interpret the results as you see fit.
 
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